Will you tell management about a co-employee who renders long hours of OT?

@bingskee (5237)
Philippines
April 15, 2011 12:05pm CST
And does nothing. Yes, that is the main concern. Will you have the guts to tell management about a co-employee who renders long hours of OT doing nothing but play games in Facebook? If it will not mean that he will be terminated and loose his job then I'll tell. Maybe giving a second chance will make him improve. If the top management supports suggestions such as this as controlling the OT then I'd give it a go. But if I know that there will be no action, why will I tell? It is a paradox actually why in offices, the employee who whistle blows and shows concern is the one looked at as a bad person. I mean, it is always against the policy to render OT without an output but people who do this twist the story that the concerned employee is just envious or a 'vacuum'.
3 people like this
11 responses
@thesids (22357)
• Bhubaneswar, India
15 Apr 11
Dear Ms. Bingske I would have a talk with this employee first before reaching out to the management. It would work two way- if he changes, good for the company. If he doesnt - and he is rude, it would help me go to the management. The only problem - if he doesnt change and did not go rude
1 person likes this
@cgrant (270)
• Spanish Town, Jamaica
15 Apr 11
he will eventually be caught.
1 person likes this
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
15 Apr 11
hello, thesids, i think being in the company for more than two decades, these employees/workers know what is right and wrong. talking with them will not change the attitude. in this kind of scenario, it is always the newbies who suffer. hi, cgrant. most of the time it is that thought that reminds me because everything has an end. the worst thing is to have ending that ruins one's reputation.
1 person likes this
@thesids (22357)
• Bhubaneswar, India
16 Apr 11
@cgrant: Hi dear and welcome to MyLot. I am quite sure that he would be caught too. But as Ms. Bingskee mentions, such people who have been doing thi for long, they are quite aware of their way out. They can always come up with excuses as they know the tricks to avoid the mess. @Ms. Bingskee: Yes, you are quite right, it is mostly the newbies who suffer and they are more prone too. As they always have that curiosity, impatience or even lack of knowledge of rules. My response above was for the newbies. The seniorsare seniors and many a times they are in the good books of the management... so complaining about them is inviting troutble for me
• United States
15 Apr 11
I don't know exactly what I would do in that situation. However, unless it will better the company or the person I probably would just let it go. IT doesn't sound like the person will change even if they were "caught" so why bother?
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
15 Apr 11
the sad part is they will not change anymore. it is ingrained in their system for many years. i think this is more the fault of the management. but it can also be that the management trusted some who did not do their jobs effectively.
1 person likes this
@cgrant (270)
• Spanish Town, Jamaica
15 Apr 11
we just need to do what we have to do and leave people to check their conscience. although it is a fact that some people have none.
1 person likes this
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
16 Apr 11
indeed some people have none.
• United States
15 Apr 11
Hello bingskee Hypothetically I am a coworker; I would personally discuss with the employee my observations in a way where I would explain how if others too notice he/she is potentially at risk of loosing their job. I would hope the employee at least would understand my reasoning for speaking to him/her and assure the employee that I would not go to management but that their are others concerned as well. It the employee does not change his work ethics then I at least feel it is his own conscious later in the event he got fired, mine would be free and clear that I tried to help.
1 person likes this
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
15 Apr 11
hi, dear! talking with these employees now will not help. when i was new they were defending their actions without me asking why. they do not listen to advices anymore being in that situation for more than two decades for some. the system has to have an overhaul.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Apr 11
That being the case then I would have no choice but to carry as a loyal employee and allow the others to continue as they are. With the hopes that one day the high up boss can distinguish a good from bad employee. Shame to hear this though, completely unfair and wished it were different for you all in your country. Here we have labor laws and with enough documentation we would have our rights protected in the event we were unfairly let go if we are loyal employees and discussed such with our employers and let go or treated unfairly.
1 person likes this
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
16 Apr 11
the funny part sometimes is when these people cries 'unfair' when they were the ones who were unfair for so long a time.
@cgrant (270)
• Spanish Town, Jamaica
15 Apr 11
i would speak to the employee first and try to encourage him not to. it might be that he/she has a lot of debts and need to get rid of them although that is not the proper way to go about it.a person should work for their pay, as an employee you are obligated to do the work of the organization. I do not think i would tell management because i dont believe in whistle blowing. Its a hard decision to make.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
15 Apr 11
whistle blowing is truly a hard decision to make. it is very risky for both employees. most of the time the reason why employees and workers render OT is because they needed money for many reasons and one of them is to pay debts. but i still believe that they should have output.
1 person likes this
@sender621 (14956)
• United States
15 Apr 11
There may be a practical reason that a co worker is working a lot of overtime hours. As long as the company is willing to pay them for the job they do, I say let them do it. If a co worker is willing to put in the time to do the job, then they should be allowed to work.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
15 Apr 11
OT's here are signed with approval by supervisors and heads who are equally doing the same pattern. practical to me is when they produce results. the current system is so fallible that it can really be manipulated. workers and employees render OT without output. OT must be required from an employee because it is a necessity. what is happening now is that they render OT everytime they want to not because it is needed.
1 person likes this
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
15 Apr 11
I would have a talk with the person. And I'd just say that if I have noticed they are using their OT for not working, then management will eventually notice. And I would leave it at that. I wouldn't report it to management though.
1 person likes this
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
15 Apr 11
hi, dawnald. it actually depends on the person. some may even take it against you. especially here in the Philippines. they do not want to be bothered with their anomalous ways. the risk that one would put through in telling management is big. it could give the whistle blower a hard time plus the fact that he or she has to support it with evidences. the problem is will this action be supported by management when they were the ones who could have established a system that would deter any employee to do such a thing?
1 person likes this
@kheydia (883)
• Philippines
16 Apr 11
I will not, if i am not ask to. I will talk to my co worker about it and try to help realize that what he/she's doing is stealing or dishonesty and someday consequences will come. It's not my business to interfere with that matter but if the management will ask me for confirmation of course i will tell them the truth, but to be the first one to open it up to them, i will have to think about it many times.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
16 Apr 11
it is understandable that workers or employees will not want to be implicated with such situations. those violations could actually cost their jobs. but then again, it really makes me think at times. do we really have to be silent when we have the power to change the wrong?
@kheydia (883)
• Philippines
17 Apr 11
If conscience will beat me and i have let the management know about it then maybe i could find a way to let them know about it, without telling them personally or maybe i could just warn them through letters.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
8 Jun 11
that could be done but there are a lot of things to consider.
@dreamy1 (3815)
• United States
16 Apr 11
If I was not that coworkers immediate supervisor I would not confront them. If I had to say something I would give the supervisor a heads up and let them know that they need to look into some workers performance. I believe it will come out eventually that they are not being productive but I wouldn't confront anyone directly as I feel it's not my place if they are a peer I would rather go to the supervisor and let them handle it.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
16 Apr 11
that is one important thing to do - to inform the supervisor. but the supervisor is equally the same, rendering OT without really the need and without checking on his subordinates. what they want to actually impart is -- do not meddle, mind your own business. i think in this kind of work situation, it is the management that has to take action.
@dreamy1 (3815)
• United States
16 Apr 11
If this is the corporate culture then it seems there is little you can do other than tell the owners.
@skysuccess (8881)
• Singapore
16 Apr 11
bingskee, I am a little puzzled with your company here, on how the management could or would simply approve overtime without due consideration. Overtime is usually not encouraged openly and the management requires relevant department heads to justify it. So, I have to ask that you hesitate here. The fact that the overtime staff isn't doing anything and has the management's or superior's approval to stay behind to work can be a little tricky at both ends. I'd say leave it as I am sure if it is a legitimate overtime, then I am sure your colleague will definitely face consequences when he is unable to produce his assignments upon deadline.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
17 Apr 11
the company is lax, skysuccess. there is a lot to improve and there are reasons why this is going on for years. those OT requests are legitimate in the sense that they are approved. people got used to the system and dont care a tad anymore. i just hope that given the laxity, people will just regulate themselves.
@marty3888 (2359)
• United States
16 Apr 11
I say let managment discover it. That way, you're not looked on as a bad person and you don't get someone in trouble. I guess the only reason is if you yourself need the overtime and can get it by telling management. Otherwise, I'd just leave it alone.
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
17 Apr 11
with the current situation, i am leaving it alone, marty, with hopes that the management will someday fix the system.
• United States
16 Apr 11
Bingskee- I always find these situations interesting because the ones who complain tend to be doing the same thing. I cannot tell you the number of people I know who game on FB and write on Mylot while on "clock hours" at their job. However, I do view it differently. I feel if they are the types who simply need to multitask while doing a very difficult job then so be it. Even if they have OT it doesn't mean they've wasted all day playing on FB or Mylot, it may mean they've checked in from time to time but are simply in a job that is incredibly busy and strenuous. I suppose all I can advise is a story I heard about Gandhi. He had a mother come to him one time asking him to tell her son to stop eating candy. So, Gandhi told her to bring her son back in 2 weeks. She was confused and left but returned in two weeks with her son. When she asked why she had to wait for him to speak to her son he told her it was because he could not tell her son to do something he was doing himself. So, before you go and report your fellow employee make sure you crystal clean of any infringements of the job (long breaks, talking with others at work about non work issues in passing, etc). Namaste-Anora
@bingskee (5237)
• Philippines
16 Apr 11
it would be interesting if that is the case - the one complaining doing the same thing, or much worse (and that would be entirely a different story). but this is not the case. this is about employees and workers who are very obviously seen as rendering OT without doing nothing but playing FB. they have the nerve to play farmville even if others are around and complete, say for example, a requested three hours overtime just browsing FB. the ones who notice (they have not done the complaining yet) are not blind, they see these anomalous activities most of the time. that is why there is a concern why the management has not acted on it. it is understandable to see other employees to take breaks and chat from time to time, especially those who are efficient and effective and responsible. after all, it would be very boring to be doing work without talking, or throwing jokes at each other once in a while. but this is abuse, to request for OT everyday without really the need, or without an output, as in nada. the funny thing about it is those who really are productive tries to understand and always try to give the benefit of the doubt while these people revel probably with thoughts that they are gaining more than the others. one more funny thing is if somebody comments about it they will be misconstrued or judged as envious.