Are you a dog owner? Know a dog owner? Shocking information that I didn't even

Canada
May 6, 2011 7:03am CST
know. I just read this piece through an email, confirmed by Snopes as well. I can't take credit for it, I'm just posting it as information. It will make you reconsider these particular food items being in your home if you do have a dog. Written by: Laurinda Morris, DVM Danville Veterinary Clinic Danville , OH This week I had the first case in history of raisin toxicity ever seen at MedVet. My patient was a 56-pound, 5 yr old male neutered lab mix that ate half a canister of raisins sometime between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM on Tuesday.. He started with vomiting, diarrhea and shaking about 1 AM on Wednesday but the owner didn't call my emergency service until 7 AM. I had heard somewhere about raisins AND grapes causing acute Renal failure but hadn't seen any formal paper on the subject. We had her bring the dog in immediately. In the meantime, I called the ER service at MedVet, and the doctor there was like me - had heard something about it, but... Anyway, we contacted the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center and they said to give IV fluids at 1 & 1/2 times maintenance and watch the kidney values for the next 48-72 hours. The dog's BUN (blood urea nitrogen level) was already at 32 (normal less than 27) and creatinine over 5 (1.9 is the high end of normal). Both are monitors of kidney function in the bloodstream. We placed an IV catheter and started the fluids. Rechecked the renal values at 5 PM and the BUN was over 40 and creatinine over 7 with no urine production after a liter of fluids. At that point I felt the dog was in acute renal failure and sent him on to MedVet for a urinary catheter to monitor urine output overnight as well as overnight care. He started vomiting again overnight at MedVet and his renal values continued to increase daily. He produced urine when given lasix as a diuretic. He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and they still couldn't control his vomiting. Today his urine output decreased again, his BUN was over 120, his creatinine was at 10, his phosphorus was very elevated and his blood pressure, which had been staying around 150, skyrocketed to 220 ... He continued to vomit and the owners elected to Euthanize. This is a very sad case - great dog, great owners who had no idea raisins could be a toxin. Please alert everyone you know who has a dog of this very serious risk. Poison control said as few as 7 raisins or grapes could be toxic. Many people I know give their dogs grapes or raisins as treats including our ex-handler's. Any exposure should give rise to immediate concern. Onions, chocolate, cocoa, avocadoes and macadamia nuts can be fatal, too. Even if you don't have a dog, you might have friends who do. This is worth passing on to them.
1 person likes this
3 responses
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
9 May 11
It is amazing what you find out that can be fatal to animals. It is sad that the dog had to die because of carelessness of the owner. I don't have a dog any more, but I think if I did, I would make sure that I didn't feed him/her anything that a dog wouldn't normally eat. I hope that people will take this warning to heart and stop feeding animals people food that isn't normally part of their diet. Thanks for sharing this.
@jazzsue58 (2672)
11 May 11
Sometimes you can't help it though. Where I leave, people are worse than pigs, just discard their trash (food wrappers and uneaten food) on the pavement or park areas. Frodo HAS to be off the leash, in order to run -he's a Dallie, born to run as they say. So far, I've rescued him from lager tins, discarded do-nuts, waffle wrappers, chewing gum, half-eaten Mcdonlds (is there any other kind?) and KFC bones. The only way to keep him safe is to muzzle him, and then people will think he's a ferocious "big dog" rather than a loveable clown who sees every bit of human trash as either an extra meal or a plaything.
1 person likes this
@jazzsue58 (2672)
11 May 11
Sorry - McDonalds.
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
11 May 11
I haven't heard of a Dallie, but it sounds like a good sized dog. It seems sad that there isn't some law against littering or if there is one that it should be enforced. Even if there isn't one, people should take a little pride in their community and clean up after others. If there aren't people who do that for pay, then some caring people should do it just because they do care.
@Outcast (633)
• United States
6 May 11
I knew about the raisins but the others I had no idea about. Thanks for sharing and I will definatly pass the word around.
• Canada
6 May 11
By all means. All dog owners should know about this. I knew about chocolate, but none of the other items, so it's good for me to know as well.
@jazzsue58 (2672)
11 May 11
My Dalmatian is 7 months old, and this info may well have saved his life - or at least a few expensive vet bills. Dallies have a medical problem (genetic) which makes them prone to kidney stones and renal problems. They can't process a protein found in liver and beef apparently. Check - I NEVER give Frodo either of those, and in general keep his salt and fat levels down etc etc. BUT - the other week, I bought a pack of grapes. The few squashed ones went in the bin, still in the plastic - where Frodo promptly fished them out again and wolfed the lot! At the time I just thought, Wow, I've got a dog who's a vegan (he'd turned his nose up at the prime Dallie-friendly frozen meal I'd lovingly prepared for him earlier.) It's not always about shtoopid humans - that bin has a supposedly dog-proof opener on it, which Frodo worked out how to operate quite easily. He even uses his dew claw to open the back door. If he lives long enough, he might end up on telly.