when do we use on, onto, unto, in, into, at in a sentence?

@zills66 (1421)
Saudi Arabia
June 6, 2011 3:26am CST
i want to know...
2 responses
@urbandekay (18312)
6 Jun 11
The cat is on the mat The cat stepped unto the mat The cat came unto the mat The cat came in and sat on the mat The cat came into the room of the mat The cat is at the mat The cat is upon the mat all the best urban
@zills66 (1421)
• Saudi Arabia
6 Jun 11
i am confused with these examples
@urbandekay (18312)
6 Jun 11
Oops, second line should be The cat stepped onto the mat all the best urban
@zills66 (1421)
• Saudi Arabia
6 Jun 11
i see, thanks Sir!
@owlwings (39218)
• Cambridge, England
6 Jun 11
The cat is on the roof. The cat climbed onto the roof. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." ('Unto' is archaic. It is now usual to use 'to') The cat is in the house. The cat went into the house. The cat is at the door.
@owlwings (39218)
• Cambridge, England
6 Jun 11
'In', 'on' and 'at' (as well as other words like 'under', 'over', 'beneath', 'beside') imply position in relation to something but with no movement. 'To', 'onto', 'into' and other words like 'from' imply movement.
@zills66 (1421)
• Saudi Arabia
6 Jun 11
the examples you had given to me is easy. i need more explanations and examples.
@zills66 (1421)
• Saudi Arabia
6 Jun 11
i see, thanks a lot Sir!