the unfeeling healing profession

Philippines
June 6, 2011 8:45am CST
The profession of healing should be more than healing the body. I thought of this while watching House, a TV series which is one of those which I watch regularly. In reality, patients are treated as numbers or cases, forgetting that these patients are humans who have emotions and feelings which need to be attended or be taken into consideration, too. Particularly when the sickness makes patients vulnerable to depressions and anxieties. And too, I have read that emotions do affect our physical condition. I myself have experienced being in a hospital and treated like an object who needs to be repaired. I remembered wishing they could understand what I felt then and treat me with more human consideration. Have you experienced being treated like an object while receiving medical treatment?
2 people like this
5 responses
@Cutie18f (9563)
• Philippines
7 Jun 11
Yes, I know what you mean and I've seen it happen to friends and family members. Those in the healing profession do not actually give a hoot whether you die or not since you are not a member of his family. I feel the need for compassion from those in the supposedly healing profession. I remember once when they extracted some blood from my father's very frail body for testing. I did not have to be a doctor to see that he probably got a few drops of blood in his body and to be extracting blood from the already weak body did not look good, but we had to follow their procedure as they blood test was ordered by the doctor. However, what really blew my top was when they had to do it again since they forgot about the test and let the blood just lie around so that it sort of expired, so they had to get blood from him again. This really made me blow my top. It was obvious that had it been a member of their family they would have done their work without fail. It is so frustrating really. I have seen how they just apply drastic procedures on a patient who obviously was too weak to handle those procedures. Naturally, the patients die and they don't even give a hoot if that happens.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
7 Jun 11
That's horrible, cutie... There's no excuse for that. It is plain negligence which they should not allow to happen. I wonder what they would feel if they were in your father's place! That's what is needed in their profession...empathy and compassion for the pain a patient is going through and not take it for granted. Thanks for your response.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
6 Jun 11
I never had that problem except with my family doctor who had the personality of a wooden stick. Now I think that with medical people, I suspect that much of their coolness is due to them not wanting to feel overwhelmed or overly sorrowful especially when the patient is dying. For instance, I did not feel bad when the nurses and doctors looking after my husband in his last few months did not break down and cry. I mean I wanted them to care for him not to say "oh he is suffering so much, I can't take it anymore!" and go screaming out of the room. So there has to be a middle ground.
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
7 Jun 11
You are lucky you had so much care. When my family doctor sent us first to a specialist because he thought my husband had a stroke, she knew right away that he had als. And she told me by her action, that this was not the first time our family doctor had made this mistake. The trouble is that there are a shortage of family doctors and we have to take what we can get. So now I do not have a family even when I got my knee chip surgery, they asked me if I had one. And the specialists doctors and nurses were very kind to my husband when he was in his last month, even doing home visits .Thank goodness for medical professionals as this. They make up for the bad ones.
• Philippines
7 Jun 11
When my mother was sick and in a hospital, there were times when I felt resentful with doctors who just breezed through with questions they don’t seem to expect answers to. But in fairness, there was this intern who really took time examining my mother’s leg (the pain was in her leg) and found out a clot in one of the veins. I watched him examine the leg for some time (and it really took time) and I saw the expression like ‘Eureka’ I found it and I would say I loved him that very moment for locating the pain. Perhaps, one enters the medical profession with zest and zeal and the pains and the frustrations of deaths dull them from any emotions. Perhaps, keeping one’s emotion in check enable them to function well. But still, a little of human-ity won’t hurt. Thanks for your interactions, suspenseful and stitchwitch. Have a nice day to both of you.
1 person likes this
@gerald_lian (2192)
• Australia
6 Jun 11
I honestly feel like this too sometimes. Many medical practitioners that I have consulted before are so busy that I'm in the appointment room and I'm out the next couple of minutes wondering if I have been thoroughly assessed for my medical condition. I feel a lot of these medical practitioners are aiming to see more and more patients to rake in as much money as they can. Despite this, I believe there are still medical practitioners that still genuinely care about their patients, although the numbers are pretty scarce these days. I myself work in the healthcare field (as a pharmacist), and I care for all my customers/patients and treat each of them like a family member who needs health assistance, and I will spend time talking to them and recommending appropriate products no matter how busy I am with other work commitments.
• Philippines
7 Jun 11
Hi gerald... I agree that there are doctors who are cold as their stethoscopes. But I also agree that there are doctors who do care and I wish that there are more of them. You should have been a doctor and there will be one more kind doctor to make patients smile. Cheers, gerald_lian!
• Australia
7 Jun 11
Thanks for the compliment, but I ever did consider being a doctor before but after doing a bit of research and self assessment, I concluded that I am not really the type of person built to be a doctor......anyway, a pharmacist is as close as possible that I can get to becoming a doctor and that's where I ended up!
@kaypow (69)
• Canada
3 Jul 11
It would be wonderful if we had enough doctors in the world to allow every patient to be treated as a human being instead of a numbered case. However, the fact is that doctors and nurses have to take care of dozens of people each day and simply do not have time to sit down and have a conversation with each and every one. As a child, I was lucky to have a wonderful doctor who always paid close attention to every patient. He diagnosed my asthma when the doctors in my local hospital's emergency room said that I had bronchitis and sent me home with medication that made me ill. However, now that I am no longer a patient of that doctor, I am forced to go to the emergency room for every ill and have never been pleased by my experiences there. I am always given the wrong medication (or too much of the right one) and something always goes wrong (my IV exploding, for one). Hospitals are very impersonal places, but I have to admit that they have a reason to be. The healtcare system is overloaded and I can't blame doctors for being stressed and hurried.
• Philippines
24 Jul 11
Hello kaypow... I had a similar experience with you when I was a child, too. I was diagnosed of having a cancer and this gave my mother unimaginable stress. An uncle who was a doctor from our hometown and who was visiting said it was just a boil and gave me a medicine which cured it. I suppose you are right and doctors need the shield of objectivity with so many patients to care for. Still...it would be nicer to have a doctor who could give a little personal touch. Cheers!
6 Jun 11
People here in the UK don't like to even think of having to go into hospital because of this. Suddenly you become less than human and are considered as just an illness or disease. Very few staff even bother to find out what you're called. I know there are exceptions and some hospitals pride themselves on their excellent patient care but they are not all like that. They should be!
• Philippines
6 Jun 11
That's true, mandolingirl... This is the reason why, if I can help it, I would rather stay at home and be cared for by my family who can look after you with love and care. Although there are exceptions, for sure, but they are that...exceptions rather than the rule. Sigh! Thanks for your response and have a nice day ahead!