training a horse ground rules

@dtroas (481)
United States
June 25, 2011 5:20pm CST
I got my daughter two horses' one we are having a good time getting ground rules set for her. The other she is a much larger horse 16.1 hands, and we are having a time with her. She does not want to listen at all. And have a very bad attitude could you tell me somethings that we could do to get her to want us to work with her. If there is anymore information please just ask. I am new to this horse thing. I should have really done my homework before now. Thanks,
5 responses
@ElicBxn (60825)
• United States
25 Jun 11
I'm not quite sure what you are wanting to teach her. Some horses are pretty stubborn, and its just a matter of making sure they know that breaking the rules doesn't get them any rewards. I'm not a great believer in punishing, but I will say that a horse has to know who is boss, and most people can't really hurt a horse very badly unless they are using equipment that can hurt the horse. Of course, I'm only 5 feet tall, and sitting on top of a horse, the best I could do with a riding crop was get a horse's attention, but I could also keep the horse from doing the wrong thing - a man can do a lot more damage than I ever could, so that is a consideration.
@dtroas (481)
• United States
26 Jun 11
Thank you for replying. I am not for the abuse either with a horse. A lot of people tell me to whoop her but I can not bring myself to be mean. Not to mention she is much bigger then I am.. But thanks for the advice
1 person likes this
• Canada
26 Jun 11
Using a whip, when used with care, wont hurt the animal. But it does help with the reinforcement of rules.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60825)
• United States
26 Jun 11
You didn't say how old this horse is. How good riders your children are, or what kind of horse she is. I am not advocating a "whip" but it maybe that you need to work her on a lunge rein until she's tired enough to be obedient. There is a difference between hurting a horse and correcting them. A mother horse bites or even kicks (but not killing type kicks) to teach her young. A new horse in a herd is treated the same until she or he finds his place. I knew a horse who had a reputation for biting, and she had good reason to snap, you could see the scars from saddle sores around her girth. But she was being ridden by a gal who "didn't believe in punishment" and when the mare snapped at her, she'd slap her on the neck (like that helps) and say "Bad Bucky, bad Bucky." Well, the day came when the horse bit her BAD! Honestly, the ONLY reason she wasn't more seriously hurt was because she was wearing so many layers of clothing because it was cold. I gave the horse 3 hard slaps to the nose because I was worried about the NEXT person. In fact, I told the gal, "You deserved that! I only hit her because of the NEXT person!" BTW, the owner of the stable never ONCE said anything about the way I treated her horses and EVERY horse I dealt with out there was a better horse after I was through with it.
• Canada
25 Jun 11
I have no knowledge in this field, but I do have some suggestions based on the information you've provided. The other horse works well with you, so what I think could work is if you have the other horse out there when you're working with the one that does well with the rules. Having the other horse out there will allow her to see what you're doing and possibly have her warm up to the idea of working with you. Secondly, try treats. Bring them out and have them in your pocket. If the horse obeys a command, give her a treat, it's positive reinforcement, and it should help her understand that work is good for her. With treats, try something first. Using carrots would be the best thing. Show her the carrot and then walk away with the carrot in her view. If she follows you, give it to her. Walk away from her. Turn around and bring out another carrot. Tell her to come to you. If she does, give her the carrot. It's kind of the same with children. If they do something good, they get positive reinforcement right? See if that works, I wouldn't be surprised if it does.
@dtroas (481)
• United States
26 Jun 11
Thanks for replying we have done the treats. And there is a lot that she will listen to. The only problem that we do have when it comes to working with both of them. If ginger wants to get stubborn, then sweetly decides that she will be to. I am just wanting to give Ginger a chance to warm up to use. She is a very beautiful horse. And she shows loving and caring to us. My husband has rode her twice. The last time she bucked him off. So therefor he does not want the girls on her, with them just being 9 and 14. But I will keep your advice at hand.
• Canada
26 Jun 11
How old is Ginger and how long has she been saddle broke for? If she's not used to being ridden, or she spooked for some reason, this could be why she bucked him off.
• India
25 Jan 14
It is necessary that one should undergo ground Manners training to their horse. Ground manners teaching for horses give us their full attention, builds their confidence, be respectful, respond to the cues given. Make sure you should abuse them. source:-
Park Lane Equestrian specializes in offering English-style riding lessons in the Dallas area. We offer Hunter/Jumper, Dressage, and Western.
@carolscash (9501)
• United States
9 Jul 11
I own horses as well. Sometimes horses seem to have their own minds and we must get there attention by using wither treats or by lunging them a lot or even using a small crop stick to gain the attention that you need. Horses do like treats and so that is a great way to begin training. ALso, you must earn a horse's trust and respect or you will never get far with them.
• United States
26 Jun 11
It's hard to know how to help with your situation, you weren't really specific in your post. What are you trying to get the horses to do, how old are they, and how much previous training have they had? If I knew more about what's exactly going on, then maybe I can help you out.