Getting a GED is NOT Quitting School

United States
September 8, 2011 3:57pm CST
Okay, I must preface this by saying that this woman meant well. That said, here's the story: My daughter got her GED in March of this year. That means that she is out of school for the nonce. She is working two jobs and saving for college which she will attend in two years. I am very proud of her and support her in her goal, which is that she wants to get her cosmetology license and work as a cosmetologist doing hair and makeup. This week she got a letter from a local woman who has sort-of adopted her as a granddaughter. In it this woman stated that she was "sad when you quit school". My daughter was, of course, upset...and understandably so. I don't know what information this woman got or where she got it from but I feel the need to straighten her out on the facts. The trick is HOW! I don't want this to rest too long or it will fester and the misapprehension this woman is operating under will cause more misunderstandings but at the same time I am just a little livid that she would make such a statement without checking the facts so I want to calm down first so that I don't alienate her in my fury. Have you ever had such misunderstandings happen? How long did you wait to talk to the individual and how did you approach the topic? I just have never understood why people would jump to wrong conclusions without checking out the facts first. Have you ever done that? I certainly try not to.
3 responses
@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
8 Sep 11
because a child leaves school before she is set to graduate can be upsetting to someone who is outside and doesn't know the facts... I knew a boy who in 10th grade, went and got his GED and then took a scholarship to MIT. He knew he had no business remaining in a school system that was not furthering his education. I would contact this friend and tell her that your daughter got her GED so that she was free to work and earn enough for tuition for college. That you encouraged her to do so since she was not learning in high school, obviously because she passed her GED. Tell her that you are proud and supportive of your daughter and that she should be as well. Getting a GED is not an "easy" way out, dropping out is, but its also the way of failures, obviously since your daughter has her GED, she HAS the high school equivalency and is now preparing for further her education.
2 people like this
• United States
9 Sep 11
Yes. I had one friend tell me that she thought a GED was even harder to get than a high school diploma. The tests are very stringent. My daughter tested very high in all but one section, too. I was very proud of her.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
9 Sep 11
that's what we tried to tell the idiot nephews and niece of the roommate, but they are idiots and their mother is an even BIGGER idiot...
1 person likes this
• United States
9 Sep 11
Oh, well...idiocy springs eternal, I guess.
1 person likes this
@dlpierce (489)
• United States
12 Sep 11
Perhaps your daughter could reply to this in a sweet tone and let her know why she got a GED instead of wasting precious time in classes. She could tell her about all her plans, making this woman feel better. Maybe in a reply you'll find out how she was misinformed.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Sep 11
Thanks, I have spoken to my friend and cleared things up...I think. Have a great day.
@bagarad (13043)
• Paso Robles, California
9 Sep 11
First, I would assume this woman knows little about the importance of the GED. She may have heard stories of people who had dropped out of school and had taken the GED later on. Many people have no idea it's a way to get rid of the high school requirement so one can go to college early. I would probably ask this woman why she thought your daughter had quit school and see if she cites the news of passing the GED as a reason. I would approach her calmly as a person who was curious and wondered how she came to that conclusion. Then I would respond the way the previous responder suggested. I see no reason to be angry because this woman was obviously ignorant about something. She should be happy to learn that the GED was a sign of success -- not failure. The I'd invite her over for a cup of coffee (or whatever) to celebrate your daughter's success and future goals.
• United States
9 Sep 11
What floors me is that this woman is the matriarch of a large local family. Her daughter recognized my daughter's GED and gave her a graduation card and cash gift when she passed it. Her daughter-in-law is a close friend who has heard me talk about my daughter's plans in depth. It just boggles my mind that this woman would not have discussed the details with her daughter and daughter-in-law and found out the facts. But she may not have gotten all the details. I will ask her. I have called her and she has not returned my call yet. She wasn't home and I left her a message. I was just upset because my daughter was upset. I will straighten this out, I'm sure.