World's first food fat tax

@bhanusb (5709)
India
October 2, 2011 9:52am CST
Denmark has introduced what is believed to be the world's first fat tax- a surcharge on foods that are high in saturated fat. Butter,milk,cheese,pizza,meet,oil and processed food are now subject to tax if they contain more than 2.3% saturated fat. Danish officials say they hope the new tax will help limit the population's intake of fatty foods. However,some scientists think saturated fat may be the wrong target. they say salt, sugar, and refined carbohydrates are more detrimental to health and should be tackled instead.
5 people like this
9 responses
@petersum (4526)
• United States
2 Oct 11
So the Danes are taxing something that they don't own and haven't paid for! Why not tax the air or the sunshine? I wont go to Denmark because they would have to tax me! I've got plenty of fat!
3 people like this
@maximax8 (27954)
• United Kingdom
2 Oct 11
I am amazed to hear that Denmark has introduced the world's first far food tax. I have a vegan diet and live in England. A person needs calcium and protein. So the full fat soya drink tastes lovely. There are only a few vegan margarine types available: pure sunflower or pure soya. I like to eat nuts and these are high in fat. Many busy people eat processed foods because they are quick and easy. I think the scientists are right to question sugar, salt and refined carbohydrates. Eating enough vitamins and minerals are important. Fruit is meant to be a healthy eating choice yet it contains natural sugar. People in Denmark must feel confused what to buy to eat.
3 people like this
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi maxi my friend, I'm delighted that you are a vegetarian. In India a good number of people only eat vegetables. But they drink cow's milk. People need fat for protein and calcium. But excessive consumption of fat is detrimental for health. In this consideration the Denmark Government imposed tax on food that contains excessive fat. Yes I think the Danish people are confused.
• United States
2 Oct 11
I am not sure if this will stick. Here in the U.S. we were going to be taxed on any drink that was not 100% juice. But that does not make sense to me. I feel almost everything we eat is bad for us now. So how can government decide what to tax and what not to tax. Also, this is another way to control the country. What next? Are they going to tax us if we do not use the bathroom at a certain time? Ok I know that sounds silly. But so does taxing what we eat!
2 people like this
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi zukichucha, Governments need fund to run the country. So time to time they impose tax on new things. The general people are under heavy pressure of price hike and over tax.
• United States
3 Oct 11
You are right. We are taxed everyday on things we buy and services we use. Occasionally, the government still needs money so they make up new taxes. It is a shame that they can not cut programs we really don't need and "find" the money right in front of their faces. Instead we are the ones that have to suffer.
@Masihi (4228)
• Canada
2 Oct 11
At first I agreed with the fat tax but then I'm thinking they should tax processed foods, junk foods, fast food joints, that sort of thing. Butter, milk, sugar, that sort of thing are basic essentials that every family uses, even the healthy families. Cheese shouldn't be taxed but maybe the processed cheese, yes. Anyway, that's my opinion, they really shouldn't just lump all fat stuff into one category.
2 people like this
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi Mashi, taxation is not the proper way to achieve a goal. People would not be liked to be over taxed.
@greenline (14864)
• Canada
2 Oct 11
Yes, I read about that in the daily newspaper here this morning. That was quite interesting. I have not heard about ant tax rule like that. This is an interesting initiative Denmark Government is taking. I can see their objective, indeed.
1 person likes this
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi greenline, let see the reaction of the Danish people.
• Canada
2 Oct 11
Interesting, but if we just tax everything in food that could be bad for us, we might as well just raise the price of food alltogether. Tax the fat maybe, but as you said, what about the other elements of food that are bad for us? Do we tax them too? And then what are people going to eat? LOL
1 person likes this
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi danishcanadian, I don't think impose tax is the proper way to prevent the people of consuming foods those are harmful for our health. It needs campaign.
@veganbliss (3903)
• Adelaide, Australia
3 Oct 11
This was on the news last night. The Danish don't think it will make much difference at all over there. In all the pictures of Danish people I've ever seen, none look obese to me. On the contrary, most look quite slim! The people believe there are other measures that would have been more effective, as you say. I do think it's a step in the right direction though, even if it isn't applied in the correct way. Along with the tax, they should be promoting & subsidizing healthier alternatives & pointing out exactly what is so very wrong with saturated fats that we should avoid them. I wonder what they will use the tax money for? I can't wait for the idea to be implemented down here. We are still the most heavily taxed nation on earth & about to cop another one in July (Carbon Tax!), so if they wanted to add yet another tax, it wouldn't be a problem! One thing the tax should do, however, is to force manufacturers to be more creative with the ingredients they choose to use. The alternatives can be used to taste just as good!
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi veganbliss, may be Danish Government wants their people remain slim and beautiful. The governments are finding no way to control inflation and price hike. So they are trying to calm down the economy by any means.
• Adelaide, Australia
3 Oct 11
Ah! So that's it, eh? A political diversion tactic! Well, in either case, it's better than some of the political diversion tactics we've seen down here. Plus it seems to have the effect of international health groups in particular viewing Denmark in a good light.
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
25 Nov 11
Bravo! Perhaps they should put a tax on each of those things! Not only would it bring money in that could be applied to health care, but it would make the point that these items are not good for you. Thanks for sharing this! Happy thanksgiving!!!
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
25 Nov 11
But many cautious people also attracted by fatal diseases.
@SIMPLYD (78765)
• Philippines
3 Oct 11
That's good news for Denmark. At least those companies will now try to limit the saturated fat they have on their products. At least, the people are assured that the food products they are buying have regulated percentage of saturated fat. I hope that could also be adapted in our country.
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
3 Oct 11
Hi SIMPLYD, I hope your government will follow Denmark.