Reading Literature for Character Formation

@srjac0902 (1170)
Italy
October 24, 2011 4:07am CST
Some schools and some parents insist so much on knowing literature and they do insist that their children should read the literature. Most of us may remember our grandparents narrated us so many stories when we were small and they concluded the story with a moral lesson. Sometimes they used rhetoric or they asked us questions and wed had to reson and reply. They did not know to read and write but they knew so many stories. We may remember when we were small our parents wished us befpre going to bed and mummy read the stories or poems and slowly we went fast asleep. Our grandparents and Parents had been unofficial psychologists. They knew unknowingly perhaps, that at a moment of semi awakened and semi sleeping time the subconscience would record all the affirmations and that would attribute to our character formation. They did pronounce the positive affirmations. All this helped us to be so much emotional with a desire to be someone great, efficient and do good to others, buld up a sound moral character and live with dignity. Our grandparents would often remind us saying we should be greater than our parents and bring good name to the family. To justify this they would narrate us so many moral stories.
1 person likes this
5 responses
@Liliac26 (558)
• Romania
24 Oct 11
I think reading (or being read to) is a fun way for kids to learn about the world, about values and concepts. These stories can really teach children the distinction between right and wrong, and they're enjoyable for them. It's not like somebody is pushing 'knowledge' down their throats (like it often happens at school), it really doesn't feel like learning and that's why it can be more effective.
@srjac0902 (1170)
• Italy
24 Oct 11
Albert Einstein said “If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” The narration of stories to the small children will lay a strong foundation of values in children. At the little age though their percedption is limited their immagination power is very rich
@Liliac26 (558)
• Romania
24 Oct 11
I agree. Although we gain a lot in other respects as we grow up, I'm afraid many of us lose some of our power of imagination. I feel that we should cultivate it more, even as adults.
@kiran8 (15360)
• Mangalore, India
25 Oct 11
Hi srjac,A persons personality is shaped by so many influences both good and bad.Genes account for more than 50% of it and the rest comes through various interactions and influences in life.Reading literature has no doubt positive effects on the mind.However,it is not the only thing that attributes to our character formation, there are many other contributory factors as well ...Moral stories have their limitations when put into test in the practical world since some them seem to have been written with the sole idea of glorifying a certain bent of mind and belief...I would say that every single action leaves an imprint on the mind and it depends on the persona capacity or bent of mind, as to how best he absorbs it and assimilates it in his life..all the best and happy mylotting
• United States
24 Oct 11
I think that children should read as much as possible, and I think that when it comes to developing character, then the child has formulate their own. I think that people should build up a child's character in a positive way, and when they do something bad or wrong, show them why what they did was bad and wrong.
@WakeUpKitty (8707)
• Netherlands
24 Oct 11
Strange I don't recognize anything of what you are saying. So this can only mean reading bedtime stories or stories told by (grand)parents has to do with the kind of (grand)parents you have but also with where you grow up. None of my grandparents or parents ever told a story and the kind of lessons I remember from stories or poems are not that psycological at all. It's more about threatening kids what happens if you don't eat your soup (you will die within 3 days). Also I don't agree with the so called lessons you can learn from a story, tale or poem. Because the lesson is that what you see in the story. A good example is Cinderella. This story is written in the middle ages. Everybody is telling you if you are a sweet girl, work hard, no matter how bad people threat you, you will be rewarded in the end (the prince). Others say that dreams come true. So we girls been raised in a hard world where we always are the one who have to be friendly, helpfull, understanding, hard working etc. But is it true what the fairy tale Cinderella tells us? Is she rewarded because she worked hard? To my opinion she isn't. Cinderella got what she wanted because she did not listen to her stepmother. She went out althoug she was punished to stay at home. She did not obey. She made her own plan, went out and that is why she got her prince and a way better life. Because she had a goal and did not care about the consequences. She went out and only saw her goal (prince/better life). So Cinderella got her reward/great future because she worked hard for it! Not because she was such a sweetheart and let herself beaten up and be scold at by stepmother and sisters.
@Triple0 (1907)
• Australia
24 Oct 11
That's sweet to have your grandparents or parents to read a bed time story. Pretty much, my parents never did that for me and I simply hated reading when I was a kid. My Dad insisted that I read so that my English skills could improve and that I can do better in my writing at school. As a kid, I didn't really care and I simply could not touch a book. If I was forced to read at school, I simply finished a novel in 5 minutes because I just skimmed through the pages! It wasn't until high school that I realized how important reading was. I started to read, mainly online stories as they were more interesting than the books in the library. I found that my vocabulary improved and that my imagination was so much better, helping me to write better creative stories.