"i" for an "I"

India
November 10, 2011 11:19am CST
Do you know this major change? Henceforth the "I" that we use to speak of ourselves will not be used as a block letter. It can be used as a capital letter only if it comes at the beginning of the sentence as a common rule. The change has been implemented in The Times of India newspaper as well. So now the thing is "You know, i told you this news" and not "You know, I told you this news".
2 people like this
16 responses
@owlwings (38171)
• Cambridge, England
10 Nov 11
This is certainly NOT standard English usage and it actually makes text considerably harder to read.
• India
10 Nov 11
Change is permanent and new changes are hard to get accepted. An "i" for an "I" also stand for the same thing.
@owlwings (38171)
• Cambridge, England
10 Nov 11
I am with Spike. I think that someone is having you on or that the Times of India is doing it for "special effect" or something. Spelling reform periodically gets proposed and is as often rejected. This passage (which has been attributed to Mark Twain, the American humorist, but may not be by him) takes a very tongue in cheek view of the subject: "[i]For example, in Year 1 that useless letter "c" would be dropped to be replased either by "k" or "s", and likewise "x" would no longer be part of the alphabet. The only kase in which "c" would be retained would be the "ch" formation, which will be dealt with later. Year 2 might reform "w" spelling, so that "which" and "one" would take the same konsonant, wile Year 3 might well abolish "y" replasing it with "i" and Iear 4 might fiks the "g/j" anomali wonse and for all. Jenerally, then, the improvement would kontinue iear bai iear with iear 5 doing awai with useless double konsonants, and Iears 6-12 or so modifaiing vowlz and the rimeining voist and unvoist konsonants. Bai iear 15 or sou, it wud fainali bi posibl tu meik ius ov thi ridandant letez "c", "y" and "x" -- bai now jast a memori in the maindz ov ould doderez -- tu riplais "ch", "sh", and "th" rispektivli. Fainali, xen, aafte sam 20 iers ov orxogrefkl riform, wi wud hev a lojikl, kohirnt speling in ius xrewawt xe Ingliy-spiking werld.[/i]"
10 Nov 11
P.S. 'An "i" for an "I" also stand for the same thing' - no, they don't. "I" is a pronoun; "i" is simply a letter.
@LaDeBoheme (1963)
• United States
10 Nov 11
Bottom line: Where's the proof? Evidence? A link, perhaps?
• India
11 Nov 11
I don't think that is such a huge laughing matter my friend. I told you, just lay your hands on the issues of The Times of India. That is the proof I told you already. What more should I give you?
• United States
11 Nov 11
I do not live in India.
10 Nov 11
Nonsense. Hasn't happened. Someone's fooling you.
10 Nov 11
I reckon they had a massive delay in their printing process. That article was probably supposed to be printed on April 1st.
• India
11 Nov 11
@Spike Hello Spike, I am not aware if this change has been officially implemented or not. As you know I am a freelancer, I need to use that "I" umpteen times. However, I am not using the "i" for the "I". So in that sense I am not getting fooled anyhow. But I was really curious what responses I would get here. And as I expected, there were quite a few worth reading and pondering upon. Your suggestion of the All Fools' Day should reach the Times office. May be they can comment better than me. @3honor I am really amused to see you spell the word "honor" like the American spelling instead of the British spelling "Honour" Anyways, can you point out what you saw in the language policy?
@lelin1123 (15645)
• Puerto Rico
10 Nov 11
I have not heard this and if true I still will be using it the same way I was taught in school. I can't imagine using "i" like that in my writing. It looks very strange. I'm sure alot of people will not adopt this "new" change because they are use to the way they learned it in school.
@stary1 (6622)
• United States
10 Nov 11
lelin1123 I agree, too many of us have this programmed into our brains and it's automatic to use a capital letter..I can't imagine any logical reasoning for this type of change.......
• India
11 Nov 11
@Lelin1123 You were kinda 'brainwashed' to use the capital "I" as you said in your school and that is what you learnt as a student. But just imagine and anything goes for imagination, your kid is taught to use the "i". That is what will be in his blood. And if years later, a hoodwink like me emerges and says the "i" is utter nonsense use "I" instead. Do you think he will accept it. The same is the case with not only you, but all of us. We have been taught to use the capital "I" and we cannot digest the smaller one. @Stary1 Mate, not everything goes with logical reasoning, though this would be too heavy a sentence to use here. This kind of stuff can go well with spiritual things. But you are right, we are 'programmed' to use the caps "I".
@stary1 (6622)
• United States
10 Nov 11
abhi_bangal This is interesting..who made the change?? I have not heard anything about it until now.
• India
10 Nov 11
I don't know who made it. But when an international organization like The Times of India has accepted it means that is certainly official though I have yet not seen the changes on their site. The Indian arm of the Times in the print version has accepted this change for many weeks now.
@stary1 (6622)
• United States
10 Nov 11
abhi_bangal OK thank you..I'll research it later...Thanks for the info
@Lindalinda (4116)
• Canada
11 Nov 11
Maybe this change affects Indian English, or it is talked about as an item to be changed, or it is a joke. Here in Canada I have not heard anything to that effect. I do know though that there are words spelled differently in Canada as opposed to US English. I am working on an Apple computer with American English and it irritates me when the computer indicates a spelling error. I wish I could change the setting to Canadian English. I could do this on a PC but I don't know how to do it on a Mac or if it is possible.
• India
11 Nov 11
You seem to be right Linda. That is probably a change brought about in the Indian English. Otherwise, everyone would have been either talking about this or not have expressed their surprise over it. By the way which Mac do you use? Have you gone in for settings in the control panel. Maybe you can find an answer there to make the necessary changes.
@UmiNoor (3427)
• Malaysia
10 Nov 11
I don't think there's any news about this. If any changes to the English language is to be made it has to be made by an international body and not by a local newspaper. Perhaps it was just typographical error that you see in the newspaper?
• India
11 Nov 11
Can a typo error get repeated weeks together? At least that is not expected of the mouthpiece of India. I have seen these changes in the paper and so I am speaking about it. If there is anyone who has seen this, that buddy will echo the same feelings. It is as simple as that.
@flowerchilde (12520)
• United States
10 Nov 11
This is the first I've heard of this! Sometimes if discussing one of those two controversial topics, religion or politics, I will use the lower case i, as one way of not coming across as overbearing.. So I find this information very interesting and perhaps in time, I will not b3e so grammatically incorrect after all!
• India
11 Nov 11
Yes friend, there are many out here, who have heard this for the first time. But I think you have hit the nail on the head. One does not wish to show oneself overbearing. I think that is the idea behind the small case "i". It shows that we are not giving importance to oneself. Got it right.
@jwfarrimond (4475)
10 Nov 11
As Owlwings says, that is not a correct useage and I will certainly not be following that. It makes it look as if it were written by a school child who has not quite got a grasp of grammar.
• India
11 Nov 11
I am not debating here if the that usage is correct or not. That is just a causal discussion that I wanted to have as I stumbled upon this 'change'.
@secretbear (19472)
• Philippines
13 Nov 11
Hi! I go with everyone who said they have not heard of this and they don't believe there's a change in the rules about this. I don't think they will be changing that rule because "I" shall always stand for oneself, a person, and it's good as a name so it will always be capital letter I. If it has been implemented in the Times of India newspaper, then I guess that newspaper is the only one making the change. If you're making a claim like this, a major change in the English grammar, you should always support it with a reliable source.
@anil02 (2886)
• India
11 Nov 11
Hello, interesting news. But Times of India use it. Is rest world accept this change.
@jtj_hello (627)
• Philippines
11 Nov 11
Is that true? Never heard of it. It has always been in capital letter for the pronoun I. Probably we're not yet uptodate on this matter or it doesn't make that big noise yet that's why I never heard of it until now.
• United States
11 Nov 11
Perhaps you misunderstood the article or it was a satirical piece of common errors creeping into mainstream usage? I know I recently read a piece somewhere (quite sure it was not the Indian news) that was just such a satire. The point of it was that as people use more and more "text talk", errors become less obvious. I could not read the entire article, though, because of all the errors in it. I suppose I am just too much of the old school.
@wittynet (4136)
• Philippines
11 Nov 11
Well, it's the best thing that they can do. Can't you just imagine that I is the only pronoun which is capitalized whether it's used as a beginning letter or not. Of course, the exception is the pronoun he. Why? Because if we are going to replace the noun God by a pronoun, it should be capitalized. Thank you for that information.
11 Nov 11
thank you for the news abhi.
• Philippines
11 Nov 11
For better or for worse the I takes a smaller size but a point.. @_@