wait wait wait! so whats the difference of icing and frosting, a lil frustrating

Philippines
December 15, 2011 8:43pm CST
Hmmm i was a little concern of the different between frosting and Icing they say they are different some say they don't. Some say they are different because icing is a thin mixture of icing sugar and water and using to cover the top of the cake or cookies and is pourable.While frosting is not pourable and will fall in huge clump can retain its shape that is why it is used to frost a cake. anyone can clarify this confusions...
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9 responses
@MaryLynn321 (2680)
• United States
16 Dec 11
That sure sound like what I would call icing or frosting too. My mom use to take and put a little bit of flavored jello crystals in her icing for cookies. She actually called her icing frosting. I actually like to use my frosting recipe that I use for cakes for my cookies as well.
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• Philippines
16 Dec 11
=o jello crystals in icing thats new for me.
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• United States
17 Dec 11
It is just the jello from one of those packets of flavored jello. It really adds a nice flavor to the icing and frosting's as well as color. I love the raspberry jello in the icings.
• Philippines
17 Dec 11
ahh i get it it makes the icing softer rather than hard like a fondant =o?
@mspitot (3833)
• Philippines
16 Dec 11
Many people would say that the difference is that from what place the speaker would be from because the term 'frosting' is usually used in America while 'icing' is usually used in United Kingdom. Even with that distinction, there are still people who use those terms interchangeably. Icing or frosting recipes have had a lot of variations depending on the preference of the baker/decorator so it is sometimes get confusing whether it is frosting or icing or, we get the connotation that they are just the same thing. One example is that there are people that use ice and frost with buttercream. We also hear other people fondant icing. I always hear people use frosting for 'creamy vanilla frosting' but I haven't heard anyone saying 'creamy vanilla icing'. Although the two terms are used interchangeably, they really have differences. Icing is more sugary and it hardens faster. It has a thinner consistency than frosting. It is usually used on ring doughnuts, gingerbread, and cookies. It is often drizzled, brushed, or poured onto the confection Sometimes, it is best when the confectionery is dipped in it. On the other hand, frosting is thicker, fluffier, and creamier than icing. It has butter and fats making it richer than icing. It is softer than icing. It is usually chocolate or vanilla in flavor and is often contains powered sugar. It is used in cakes and cupcakes.
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• Philippines
16 Dec 11
Thanks for that very informative response mspitot, I guess it all depends on the country. But if we are talking about the viscosity(Drag) of the two they are really different, though ganache is an icing but it has a a thick viscosity like a frosting when it set and the royal icing(The fluffy more airy one) is a frosting but sets like an icing.
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@mspitot (3833)
• Philippines
17 Dec 11
Yes....with today's variation, it's really hard to identify the proper name for icing and frosting.
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@celticeagle (120476)
• Boise, Idaho
16 Dec 11
To me icing is just sugary syrup and frosting is colored and sometimes flavored as well. I don't care for either one unless it is buttercream or chocolate.
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• Philippines
16 Dec 11
I really like italian buttercream =)
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@celticeagle (120476)
• Boise, Idaho
17 Dec 11
yummy
@vivasuzi (4125)
• United States
16 Dec 11
I don't really know! But when I used "icing" it was for cut out cookies and it was meant to harden so it would stay on the cookies and not smush. When I use "frosting" I think of it as the stuff that doesn't harden. I will be interested to read the answers to see if anyone can explain this one :)
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• Philippines
16 Dec 11
yeah if someone says icing it would be good for decorating cookies especially the royal icing... and frosting for cakes.
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@wittynet (4131)
• Philippines
16 Dec 11
Hello, pepai12345678910! I am just kidding, pepai123456. I am just trying to break the ice. I am not good in baking, but I had one semester course in cooking while I was in high school. That was way back 1990! We did bake a cake for the whole group. Then we also had an individual baking. Mine was a chiffon cake. Making the icing was the easiest that I can still recall. We're just mixing the egg white with sugar. We're using an electric beater to make a mixture which looks like a whip cream, and that's it. That's the icing. With regard to frosting, I am not really familiar but I have an idea. I think cake with frosting needs to be refrigerated because if not, the frosting will melt. I have bought cakes with this kind of what I think is icing. With regard to the cake we baked when I was in high school, it's icing never melts. It remains intact though the cake is not in the refrigerator. I am not so sure if this is correct. But it's the only difference I know. But others consider icing and frosting synonymous.
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• Philippines
16 Dec 11
well there are different types of frosting, what you just did back then was a boiled icing or meringue considered to be the most simple and easy to make.Swiss butter cream, Italian butter cream are hard to make and needs a little understanding on the sugars temperature (we use boiled sugar syrup that has a specific temperature for Italian butter cream)and how they change during the temperature goes higher (I'm not saying about the sugar turning brown but the sugars ability to turn into a ball when drop to a cold water) before you add them to your eggwhites and finally adding pure butter to the eggwhites resulting to Italian butter cream.You probably need a standmixer when making swiss and italian. Actually Italian ans Swiss butter cream are stable frosting unlike the pure butter cream(Butter+milk+flavoring) they dont melt in room temperature.
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@cwong77 (2011)
• Malaysia
16 Dec 11
for me, both icing and frosting are the same is just the different kind of word. The both words have the meaning of 'ice'.. some people use the word 'frost' the cake, and some will like better 'ice' the cake.. So, I think both of these words are the same, or maybe can be what you said, the smoothless and thickness of the product that matter..
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• Philippines
16 Dec 11
yeah some says they are all the same thing because they both cover a cake. i think other countries have different views on them.
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@marguicha (103906)
• Chile
13 Feb 12
I think that they mean the same thing, only in some parts of the world they prefer one word instead of the other. Frostings or icings can be thicker or lighter depending on your needs. I use both words and if you check online you will find the same.
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@jillhill (37383)
• United States
16 Dec 11
That is correct. Frosting is thicker and icing a thin runny topping.....
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@alaskanray (4642)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Okay, where I come from icing and frosting are synonyms. What you and the rest of the folks here are calling icing is what we call glaze. Glazed donuts are very popular and cookies have also been glazed but cakes are usually frosted with icing. (lol...notice the inclusion of both terms) Glaze is runny and thin and barely coats the confection, then hardens while frosting/icing stays soft and moist. I suppose it does all depend on where you grew up. I never thought there was any difference between frosting and icing. Oh, well.
• Philippines
17 Dec 11
Yes they say professional pastry chefs doesnt differentiate the two cause they are the same...
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• United States
13 Feb 12
Again, the runny stuff is glaze.
• Philippines
13 Feb 12
true its a glaze but its still icing/frosting because icing and frosting main function is to cover the whole cake,pastry,sweet bread with something sweet ha! now im craving for some cinnamon buns....