So it looks like the government is going to try and ban cells & driving....

@mommyboo (13198)
United States
December 16, 2011 2:43pm CST
... even with hands free. I know there will be SOME of you who happen to be GLAD about this, and if you are, move on, remove yourself from my list. Clearly people who want to force everybody else to go along with something that is LESS FREE don't understand what it's like being on the other side where your rights are infringed upon and violated. Anyway, until you have been there, be careful because the next time a group of people decides to take something away from you that you consider important, maybe you'll remember this topic and stop laughing. If you are the type of person who would prefer to ban things and take away freedoms from people, I certainly do hope you eventually have something taken from you. I won't feel sorry for you, I will tell you that you brought it on yourself due to your attitude towards controlling what rights OTHER PEOPLE enjoy. It may not happen anyway, it's just something I saw on the news where there are people or groups of people who are considering doing this. I hope enough people who care about their personal rights do something like get a petition or vote NO if or when it comes up for discussion. I know I will certainly vote no against anything else that attempts to decrease my freedom or rights. PS: if you don't own a cell phone or do not use one, this isn't for you. This is written for the majority of people who actually USE cell phones everywhere they go, for business, for communication, for work, during travel.
6 people like this
16 responses
@sconibear (8010)
• United States
16 Dec 11
What's everybody even talking about all day long? We didn't have cell phones when I was young and everybody got by just fine. I don't even own a cell phone.....and barely talk on my landline, but if I watch 10 cars go by I GUARANTEE 8 out of those 10 drivers have a cell phone stuck to their ears. Again.......why do people now days have this need to constantly be talking to people who also need to be constantly talking to people who need to be constantly talking to people who need to........ If I need to talk to someone I go to their house and talk to them, or I call them and say what I need to say in under 30 seconds....DONE! It used to be drivers were supposed to WATCH FOR PEDESTRIANS......but now they're all gabbing on the phone and PEDESTRIANS have to dodge and weave just to cross the street.........trust me, I'm a pedestrian....and I always have to make sure I make eye contact with the person I'm walking out in front of. I can see if it's some kind of emergency, but I'm almost positive 99.9999999999% of people talking on their phones while driving are just yacking. Like I said......we grew up without cell phones and texting and we got along just fine. PUT THE F%@KING PHONES DOWN.....it's NOT that important! Your turn.
@owlwings (39751)
• Cambridge, England
16 Dec 11
I rather thought that "PS: if you don't own a cell phone or do not use one, this isn't for you." would immediately get someone's hackles up! I don't appreciate being told to 'move on', either. Isn't that rather like depriving some members of their "right" to free speech?
1 person likes this
@sconibear (8010)
• United States
16 Dec 11
"move on" and "this isn't for you" makes me want to get into it all the more...
2 people like this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Well, I had to put that because when I write discussions of this 'nature', I immediately get two or three replies that sound something like this - I don't know why you're so upset, I don't even own a cell phone and what's more is that I hate cell phones and have no idea why anybody would want to be leashed to something that costs them money and is basically giving other people access to bother you all day. To me, a response like that has nothing to do with the actual topic but believe me, I always get a few like that. I haven't read everything yet so just wait and see. Owlwings - the move on basically meant if you're going to run over my viewpoint as if you believe it has no merit and is not valid and whatever you think is somehow right or better, then don't answer my discussions. I'm not saying you MUST agree but I don't need to pop in here and see people who are 180 just coming here to try and act like they are the final word. You know nobody is, this is a discussion.
• United States
16 Dec 11
I can't see how they can ban hands free phones. My gosh - the car has onstar - you can talk to them, or to the person next to you while you are driving.. listening to music should be banned then too! How many wrecks are caused by people jamming to thier music and not paying attention. The real ban should be on idiots who do not know how to pay attention to what they are doing -- driving!!
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Exactly, Mac. It's a slippery slope and includes things like talking to your passengers, paying attention to your kids, listening to music, changing stations, cds, putting on or swapping a movie (I have a dvd for the back seat) and what about eating and drinking? Hah. I get all sorts of crap from people whenever I mention all these other things but if you allow just ONE lost freedom, we are slowly going to lose more, and it's not right, nor is it actually enforceable in any reasonable manner. BTW PPE, it's illegal actually to wear earphones while driving FOR that reason. There are even people (who are actually idiots) who are trying to go about banning the use of earphones when people are running. Since I run, I am NOT going to ever follow something that dumb, if I need to hear people talking, I either wear ONE earphone or I have the volume way down. I don't care what someone else (who doesn't even do what I do anyway) thinks - to me this is like a male doctor (who has never been pregnant or birthed a child) believing they have any clue what pregnancy and childbirth is like. They don't know, they have no idea, they have never experienced it, so they should stuff it and respectfully shut up.
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Dec 11
It seems to me like they are trying to "dumb" us down. I may be saying that backwards actually. But like they are not allowing us to be smart enough to make our own decisions. I am also a runner, but I am smart enough to wear my earbuds and turn them down low enough so that I can hear traffic too. That's just common sense. But then - they want to make all electric cars that you cannot even hear if you do not have the earbuds in...it's all about being smart - and using it! There will always be idiots who cause wrecks, and morons who hurt themselves because they do not pay attention...you cannot legislate intelligence.
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
That bothers me and I think it should. I hate it when someone who doesn't know jack squat about me assumes something, and any time another person (who doesn't know me) assumes I am not wise enough to make my own decisions entirely - they are wrong. I don't assume I can make anybody else's decisions for THEM, nor do I force them to be around me if they don't like my choices. They are never invited to interfere with or stop my choices though. Music is one of those things I will always have on... while running, while driving. Of course I would adjust the volume accordingly. There's not much I can do about people who do not, but I am not going to suffer because they want to act stupid lol.
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
17 Dec 11
It's not a matter rights. It's a matter of safety. Last year some 3,092 roadway fatalities last year involved distracted drivers, and that's too many. Also last year ONE accident caused by cell phone texting and two two school buses plowed into a pickup truck when the driver plowed into a tractor trailer. Even accidents are caused by cell phone talking. One woman almost hit us when leaving a parking lot with a cell phone at her ear. If it were your child or family member I'm sure you would feel differently.
2 people like this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
I have been thinking about that because I knew sooner or later someone would say that. I still don't think the government has any business legislating what people do in their cars. If something happens, penalize then. You can see how well trying to legislate NOT using handsfree has worked, I still see 9 out of 10 people on handhelds. I haven't seen many accidents here caused by that. I even live in a state where that was legislated fairly quickly.
1 person likes this
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
17 Dec 11
What about having to have car insurance or having to use seat belts and car seat for kids and infant? Aren't they invasion of of privacy too. Aren't they legislated into law?
• United States
16 Dec 11
That's just stupid, what's next are they going to ban people from talking to other people in the car. Is an officer supposed to stop you if your moving your lips. There has to be some protection under the first amendment for laws like this. I can understand having a phone in your hands, but if you have invested in the equipment to make the phone hands free you need to be left alone.
• United States
17 Dec 11
Yes but where do you draw the line. Will the government only allow one person in a vehicle at a time, are we not allowed to listen to the radio. The law states you need a hands free set. To me that's enough now stay out of my car, and the fact is irresponsible drivers will still do what they want to do, that's why they are irresponsible. So really you are only punishing responsible driver with this law.
@owlwings (39751)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 11
"the fact is irresponsible drivers will still do what they want to do, that's why they are irresponsible. So really you are only punishing responsible driver with this law." This is the classic non-sequitur. Nobody is being "punished" except, hopefully, those who ignore the law. The law is necessary because some people cannot be trusted to drive responsibly. THOSE are the people you should claim are restricting your "freedom" (NOT "rights", please!)
• United States
17 Dec 11
PPE do you really want the answer to that question LOL. Yes some states have abandoned speed limits in favor of stopping people who are driving unsafely. I think this is a better solution to the problem, and Owl Wings taking away a hands free set from a responsible driver is a punishment, and driving is a right not a privilege, the government would have you think it's a privilege, but if you are trying to get away from an axe murderer I'll bet you won't really care what the government says what you can and can't do.
• Australia
17 Dec 11
"I know there will be SOME of you who happen to be GLAD about this, and if you are, move on, remove yourself from my list." You confuse freedom with licence. Consider it done. Lash
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Freedom to me means other people who don't even know me do not go about judging ME based on their interactions with a few people who are nothing like me.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
and this is how many laws are made... unfortunately.
• Australia
18 Dec 11
They're not judging you, they are judging the conglomerate of people who use cells while driving, many of whom have accidents as a result, many of which kill or injure innocent people. It's almost as obviously bad as drink driving. I disagree so strongly with you on this that removing myself from your list is EXACTLY what you're asking. Lash
@p1kef1sh (45640)
17 Dec 11
I have two issues. One I absolutely believe that the use of cellphones whilst driving should be a criminal offence. When you have seen the aftermath oif a fatal crash caused by someone using their phone whilst driving there is nothing that will persuade you that a total ban is anything but sensible. However, the other issue is that if cellphones are banned then why not radios, eating, looking at the scenery etc etc. Here in the UK they are banned. If you are involved in a crash whilst using one you go to court irrespective of whether you caused the accident or not.
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6342)
• Australia
18 Dec 11
I agree. I cannot understand why people must have their phones on while driving at all but then I only use mine for emergencies. I live in the country and if I break down then I need to be able to call for assistance. Other than that I have no use for them these days. Surely it is not so hard to wait til you are no longer driving to answer a call or make one, if it is so important then maybe they could pull over. I have seen driving becoming worse over the years since I got my licence. People used to indicate before turning, I was taught that you indicate before you get to the corner but these days the indicator appears to be an afterthought that the driver uses while turning rather than before they get to the turn. Makes it hard on the driver behind and causes accidents. It is law but too many people seem not to care these days. I think in Australia it is illegal to do anything that takes your hands off the wheel. So in that case eating etc would also be against the rules. I think that conversations take more concentration than music and drivers should definitely not be taking their eyes off the road.
@owlwings (39751)
• Cambridge, England
16 Dec 11
First of all, I think that you have a rather hazy view of "rights". You would not, I'm sure, regard it as everyone's "right" to drive a car. That right has to be earned by taking and passing the appropriate tests. It is therefore a "privilege" rather than a "right" and it can be taken away from you rather more easily than it is given. Would you regard it as a "right", also, to not wear a seat belt if you chose not to? I'm sure, too, that you would not regard it as a "right" to use a mobile phone in such a way as to cause annoyance, inconvenience or actual danger to someone else. You would not (I hope) allow that it is anyone's "right" to use a mobile phone in the middle of a Church service or a lecture or in a place where radiation from the phone might cause a life-support system to malfunction or might cause a plane crash. At least, I take it that you comply when asked to switch off your cell=phone in such situations. There is overwhelming evidence that using a mobile phone whilst driving seriously interferes with the driver's concentration. It has been demonstrated many times and in many studies that it can reduce concentration by 30%. In addition, using a handheld phone whilst driving inevitably removes the use of one hand from the task of driving and will take the driver's eyes off the road whilst dialing and certainly whilst texting. I cannot disagree with you more strongly that it is anyone's "right" to drive with less care and attention than is possibly attainable. Using a phone is something which you can choose not to do when it might be dangerous and, because many serious accidents have been caused because people seem to forget this (and not to realise how dangerous it is to them and others), it makes a great deal of sense to forbid the use of phones - certainly handheld phones - whilst driving. Please think again about your definition of "rights" and consider whether it is not, rather, due to a rather selfish attitude.
• United States
16 Dec 11
Owlwings you bring up a good point about seat belts. I do believe it should be my right to decide whether I want to wear my seat belt or not. In Pennsylvania it's not mandatory for a motor cyclist to wear a helmet, so I should have the right to decide if I want to wear the seat belt or not.
@sharra1 (6342)
• Australia
17 Dec 11
Well said. Phones are dangerous in that they removed your concentration from the road which can cause accidents and removes your ability to respond quickly. I find music is a background thing that helps me relax but does not take my concentration away. I have heard that some people even text while driving although I do not know how they manage this without ending up in a ditch. I need both hands on the wheel for proper control and even talking to a passenger can affect your concetration but possibly not as much as a cell phone. Seat belts are an interesting point. We are made to wear them for our protection but if you had to jump out of a car just before you crashed could you do it if you were wearing a seatbelt. My partner did this in his youth and now he hates wearing them and has been fined twice for not doing so. They are uncomfortable and I hate wearing them but I hate the fine as well. In the case of seatbelts the only person we are endangering is ourselves, in the case of cell phones we are endangering ever road user because driving requires your entire concentration. There is a big difference. Freedom is important but you no one has the right to endanger any other person and where that can happen freedom is curtailed in the interest of the wider community.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Owlwings - the issue here is that I do not need someone else, a stranger, who doesn't even have any idea whether I'm paying attention or not - to use the lowest common denominator... ie, the stupidest person doing the stupidest things - to judge ME or MY capability. When you start down the slope of prohibiting things because the stupidest of the stupid are consistently causing problems, hurting people, or hurting themselves, then the rights of NORMAL people are infringed upon. I'm saying this in a general sense first and then applying it to the topic at hand. What if - because several idiots are constantly falling down and getting injured, the government decides that EVERYBODY has to wear helmets to protect their heads? Not just while riding a motorcycle, now you have to do it any time you're walking around in public. Wouldn't you be offended since YOU don't fall down and get head injuries every time you go outside? I sure as heck would. I'd also think that it was a bit offensive to use those people to judge everybody and then make your rules based on the stupidity of a few. The seatbelt thing I put in the same category as wearing helmets on a motorcycle. I definitely wear seatbelts and helmets (if i'm on a motorcycle) but do I think everybody HAS TO? Actually, I think if someone else doesn't feel like it, it's not my business. If they are in my car, yes, but if someone else chooses not to in THEIR car, why should I care? Oh yes, because it's a law. Well.... many people don't care and don't follow it. It doesn't make me any less safe for someone else to not wear their seatbelt and I don't get why that matters to you or anybody else. I also find it extremely odd that most forms of public transportation do not even HAVE seatbelts. If you MUST wear a seatbelt in your private car, then why don't buses and trains have seatbelts? I hear that sometimes you also cannot put a child safety seat on a bus since there's no seatbelts, yet if your toddler is not in a safety seat in your car, you can get a $400 ticket. Talk about strange...
@betlynfrnds (1628)
• United States
16 Dec 11
I don't think I'd have a problem if people were still allowed to use hands free. I do, however, have a serious problem with people running red lights and coming oh so close to hitting me. Yes, that has happened to me recently. The idiot driver was too busy with her hand held phone to know that she ran a red light. I wanted to thump her. Yes, we do have rights, I agree. But there are too many distracted drivers on the road causing many crashes. If it were up to me I would say that hands free is fine but everything else has to stop.
@owlwings (39751)
• Cambridge, England
16 Dec 11
Studies have repeatedly shown that using a hands-free phone reduces a driver's concentration by nearly as much as using a handheld. The reason is, I think, that attention can be distracted by any conversation, and especially by a conversation with someone who is not in the car and therefore cannot be aware of when the driver needs to pay attention to driving.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Handsfree would include bluetooth, a wired headset, or speaker - I have used all three, generally I just have it on speaker. It is exactly like talking to passengers in my car. EXACTLY. I have never run into anything because I'm talking to passengers in my car. I'm not saying NOBODY has but nobody can argue that it is not the same thing. Nobody is going to try and enforce a ban on talking to passengers. Sorry. That is one of the stupidest ideas anybody has ever come up with lol. Studies that are done are slanted toward whomever is paying for it. Trust me. They may have plenty of data that shows people are just as likely to hit somebody when they are alone and eating a sandwich but for purposes of the study, they are going to rail on the fact that the person is using a cell phone and/or has passengers just to make their data look better.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
running red lights is a problem too, so they came up with red light cameras. NOW there is no way I'd want to accidentally run one of those, the fine you get is like $500. The problem now is that there are lots of people who still run them, and if you're unlucky, you get plowed into by someone behind you BECAUSE you stop when the light turns yellow. I always stop when one of those turns yellow and there have been times when I have almost been completely run over by the person behind me, i'm talking inches from my bumper because they had hoped I'd go thru so they could! I'd say those things almost cause more accidents than they prevent, not to mention they are really expensive for the cities to run them. They removed some of them from around here and I'm glad. Now I don't have to watch my rear view as much in fear of getting rearended.
@sharra1 (6342)
• Australia
17 Dec 11
There will always be a problem when your freedom clashes with another person such as having an accident because you are using a phone. Hands free phones are the only ones that should be allowed and even then they take your concentration off your driving in a way that music does not. If you are being asked questions you have to think about then you are no longer paying attention to your driving which is NOT an automatic function. The risk is you might lose control, you are not aware enough if an emergency response is required. You might argue that you drive ok but what if an accident happens and you are not aware enough or your responses are not able to function in the crucial moment. You need to be aware when driving and good drivers concentrate on their driving, they are aware of what is happening on the road and the can react fast to avoid problems sometimes. Not even the best drivers can avoid everything but if they were so busy talking on the phone that they really had no idea what was happening around them then they are an accident waiting to happen. I never even used to listen to music when I drove. I do not trust other drivers and I watch them carefully because they never indicate they are turning, they put their brakes on almost too late and they are dangerous. As to your comment about removing myself from your list. I shall do so. I believe in freedom but I know there are times when it has to be curtailed for the benefit of all.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
17 Dec 11
I didn't ask YOU to remove yourself, but if you choose to, that's fine. I see someone else I enjoy also figured I was talking about him, I was talking about neither of you. I actually think driving while tired is worse than anything, there have been times when I've been tired enough to not even remember the last minute or longer I've been driving. I've NEVER felt like that having a conversation, so in my opinion which was the less safe thing - driving tired.
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6342)
• Australia
18 Dec 11
Driving tired is very bad. I have done it when I was working and fell asleep once goind home late from work, it made me move closer to work since I was working very long hours. In the end I gave up the job because the long hours were compulsory and I am just too old and too sick to do that any more. Falling asleep at the wheel is very scary. In fact if you did fall asleep and woke up just in time to throw open the door and jump out before hitting a tree then you would be better off without a seal belt. They are protective in an ordinary accident but hard to remove in an emergency. As to removing from the list I was answering your comment.
@cripfemme (7715)
• United States
17 Dec 11
I think people are worried, rightly, that people are focusing on driving when they are talking on the phone. YOU may be responsible in cell phone use, but can you vouch for everybody? I, for myself. don't even talk on my phone when I'm driving my wheelchair on the sidewalk. I pull over, have the conversation, and return to driving.
@cripfemme (7715)
• United States
17 Dec 11
I want to be treated fairly, of course, but if I or ANY OTHER human being is acting in a way that goes against the well-being of my community I expect my community to deal with it with social or legal consequences, as needed. We are all dependent on each other.
@paigea (22484)
• Canada
26 Nov 15
I think personal rights and freedoms are extremely important. The most important one is the right to life. No one has the right to take my life because they are distracted while driving.
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
23 Jul 12
My apologies for the delay on responding to this but between school and health problems I have fallen way behind on responding to messages. I can see having a rule against talking on the phone while driving, but if you have a bluetooth or some other hands-free way of talking on the phone that should be acceptable. I wouldn't want anyone telling me I can't have my phone with me when I'm on the road because that is the main reason I got the thing! I can understand not wanting to lose any more rights as well. I do use a cell phone and unless I have the bluetooth in my ear I often don't even hear the phone ring when I am in the car. I hope that this never happens! Thanks for sharing!
@MsTickle (24993)
• Australia
26 Dec 11
For goodness sakes...it's bloody common sense not to use a mobile phone while driving. A driver has a moral obligation to focus on actual driving. If you must use your mobile phone in transit bloodywell pull over have your important conversation then resume your journey. Sheesh!
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
20 Dec 11
I don't use mine while driving, but I don't see the problem with SAFE hands free use. Now if you're fumbling with the headset while driving and all that, not safe. but if you're already wearing the thing, I don't get why they would want to ban it.
@sid556 (31005)
• United States
17 Dec 11
Hi Mommyboo, I do agree with the ban on texting while driving for sure because it's dangerous as hell and there is nothing more annoying than being behind someone at a light that is so busy texting that he/she fails to notice that the light changed. the hands free talking? I don't understand the problem with that. If you can't talk and drive then you shouldn't be on the road anyway. Actually, I drive with my phone next to me and if it rings, I can answer it and talk without taking my eyes off the road for a second. If it is in my purse, I'll either pull over or ignore it for the time. Most people would. Actually, I'm a bit torn even with the texting ban and trust me...I'm 100% against texting while driving. Thing is, if you cause an accident because you were distracted for any reason at all, whether it be your baby in the back seat, your dog, the radio...doesn't matter...it is still YOUR FAULT. So we make a law banning texting. Most of us change the dial on our radio and converse with people in the back seat etc...do we make laws against those things? I guess they are looking to prevent accidents but the thing is, anyone that allows themselves to get so distracted that they cause accidents is going to do so anyway whether it is a cell phone or a person or the radio.
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
17 Dec 11
I don't like the fact that personal rights are taken away so easily sometimes. I can see the issue with texting and driving but I don't feel like talking is a big deal...especially with the hands free option