What is the longest you've heard of a person going without having a cavity?

@writersedge (22579)
United States
January 3, 2012 11:00pm CST
My Mom was 19 years old before she had her first cavity. I was about 10 years old. My Mom grew up on a farm during the depression and WWII years. They only had desert once a week, on Sunday and soda was a treat during the holidays. Otherwise, they drank milk and spring water. Fruit was whole fruit from the farm. She didn't have juice until she was out on her own. Some spring water naturally has calcium in it from flowing through rock with calcium in it. So what is the longest you've heard of a person going without a cavity? What do you attribute the length of time to? Heredity? Lifestyle? A combination?
2 people like this
10 responses
@lifes97 (885)
• United Arab Emirates
4 Jan 12
now adays due to artificial thing in food and anything you have hard to have healthy teeth, also they say what you drink also affect your tooth, arificial things and coloring things for everyday food affects teeth, so no nor healthy teeth or tooth this world
2 people like this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
Seems to be sugar and acid in everything to make it taste better which makes for teeth without enamel. Welcome to mylot. Hope you enjoy it here. Take care.
@carmelanirel (21108)
• United States
4 Jan 12
I notice others mention not having one until their 30's or never had one and it is true. I remember years ago I was talking to a friend and she asked what it felt like to have a tooth pulled. I said, "Have you ever had a cavity?" She said "NO" I was shocked, because I thought everyone had at least one cavity sometime and considering how old her kids were at the time, she had to be in her 30's..
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
So did you figure out if it was heredity? The way they took care of their teeth? I think if my Mother had never left the farm, she would have never had one. She got into drinking juice, eating sweets every day and she still brushed 2xs a day. My Dad's family all loose their teeth before they get very old.
1 person likes this
• United States
4 Jan 12
I don't know the reason, I think there is too many varieties of why to nail it down. It can be their diet and what they eat that causes them to NOT have cavities..For example, my older (25 y/o) son who also eats lots of sweets, but also eats lots of cheese, just recently got his first cavity. While my younger son eats just as many sweets, he doesn't eat as much cheese and he flosses and brushes twice a day and has 4 cavities by the time he is 6-7... I also wonder if blood type has anything to do with it? You know how some people can go outside in mid-summer and get not one bug bite, even without protection, while another goes out, covering themselves with anti-bug spray and eats lots of garlic and yet comes home with many bug bites..
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
5 Jan 12
Yes, cheese would make more calcium. Probably get sugar off the teeth, too. I drink milk after sweets and my teeth do better than my husband's who does not drink milk afterward. He is starting to eat cheese with pie. A habit he picked up from me. I never got bit when I was young by bugs,but now I get bit the most. The change is in how much I swet. The bugs used to go to the inmates in the classroom who swet the most.From menopause on with the day and night sweating, it was terrible. Some study said that bugs are drawn to smell. So I would think phermones, too. Most bug stuff tries to mask the smell of people. Lemon works for some bugs up here. I used to swet so little, my Martial Arts instructor was worried about me. Now he wouldn't have to worry. As soon as I start to swet, it doesn't matter if I have bug spray on or not, my swet has an overpowering smell now. It used to be the little I swet, my hair obsorbed it and it released the smell of my shampoo which had smells that a bug wouldn't care about. Mostly it just smelled like soap and soap is a poison to most bugs. So now I'd have to shower every time I started to swet and leave some on me, but my skin is too sensitive for that. I've heard other stuff, too like diabetics get bit more by bugs, but don't know if that's true. Anyway, a good search would be "food that re-enamals teeth." A change in diet might be a good idea. Read down, too. Someone here knew someone with rotten baby teeth, but as an adult, didn't have cavities. At any rate, I think some of it is heredity, but some of it is probably diet and tooth care. I did watch a special on flouride. First children weren't getting enough, so they put it in the water. Then they started having kids do it in school, too thinking they weren't drinking enough water. Then the kids got too much flouride and it started to throw the enamal off balance and made it weaker. When, oh when, will Americans learn that more isn't better? Every few years, we have to fight with the FDA because someone overdoses on something. They want to take our alt medicine away from us. Yet government did this to kids' teeth. Here, we're on our own wells. We buy bottled water. Our wells have iron from all the ore miles that poluted our water years ago. Now they want to do hydrofracturing up here. Sorry to go on and on.
1 person likes this
@GreenMoo (11842)
4 Jan 12
I only got a my first cavity when I was carrying my first child. The baby takes calcium from the mother of course. The dentist said that the cavity stopped getting worse when the baby was born, so I didn't need to have it filled for many years afterwards.
1 person likes this
@hvedra (1623)
5 Jan 12
There was the "old wives tale" that you lose a tooth for every child that you have - which is based on this so actually true. It's not so common nowadays with better dentistry and healthcare but it just shows that some of those Old Wives knew what they were talking about!
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
5 Jan 12
GreenMoo Did you have the goats then? Or am I mixing you up with someone else?Did you increase your intake of calcium? Of course it's hard to know how much more to take and it takes more than calcium to make a tooth like magnesium. This is very interesting. Thanks and take care.
@GreenMoo (11842)
6 Jan 12
No, on both counts. Which is probably why I got a cavity!
@ElicBxn (60053)
• United States
4 Jan 12
Maggiepie was into her 50's or 60's I think - she still hasn't had it filled because she can't afford to, but by her age, her mother had maybe 4 teeth left in her head.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
I meant without a cavity, not without a need for a filling. My Dad's side all went to their graves with false teeth. I hope Maggiepie got it filled. Bad teeth can affect your heart.
@madteaparty (2763)
• Japan
4 Jan 12
I have never had a cavity, but I'm not gonna reveal my age Not everyone have cavities, some people die not having experienced something like having a cavity in their lifes. I'm not sure about the reasons that make some people more prone to cavities or not. I eat sweets every day, and sometimes forget to brush my teeth. However, there are people who avoid sweets and never forget to brush their teeth but have lots of cavities. I suppose it must be genetic.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
I think some of it may be genetic. Some may be other things like drinking milk with sweets or having a lot of calcium in their diets,etc.
• Chennai, India
4 Jan 12
I think it's affected by our lifestyle, though it's hereditary to little extent. I had my first cavity in my late 20s, but since then I am using a particular brand of toothpaste to prevent it from further deterioration. (Yes, the toothpaste has just delayed the deterioration, though it didn't prevent fully.) Now, I'm using the same brand for my family to prevent the start of it for my son. In my young days, we didn't have toothpaste or brush. We used to buy a toothpowder and use our fingers to clean. (Not only me, almost all people of my age in my village.) May be that should be the reason for I had cavity. Some people naturally have gaps between their teeth and it becomes easy for the germs to develop gum and teeth problems. We can't help it, except treating it.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
My teeth are so tight that I even get dental floss between. After I lost a tooth and my teeth spread out more, I can clean them better. I've heard of toothpowder. Most people used to use baking soda in this country like a tooth powder. So things change from time to time as we learn more and/or become global. People with cancer, the Dr often tells to use baking soda as a tooth powder, but with a brush and not fingers. Thank you, I'm sure some people learned much that was new to them today.
@celticeagle (114391)
• Boise, Idaho
4 Jan 12
I was probably fourteen before i started having them. My daughter is fourty and she hasn't had many problems cavity wise. We have a good program here that pays for kids preventive teeth care.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
5 Jan 12
40 is wonderful. I wish I been able to go that long. I think if my Mom had stayed on the farm, she could have.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (114391)
• Boise, Idaho
6 Jan 12
So much affects our teeth. My mom told me once that the only way to get calcium that effects your teeth is through what you chew. And acidic juices like lemon, pineapple, grapefruit erodes the coating on the teeth. This lets cavities in.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
7 Jan 12
There are some waters that are mineral waters that have calcium in them. It's not just what you chew although cheese helps, but mineral waters like Perrier and a German one that I can't spell or pronounce that has even more calcium in it. Juice erodes,but mineral water can help put it back.
1 person likes this
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
6 Jan 12
I do think it is a combination of those. My son is 23 and his teeth are great. I don't know how they could be, but they are. My girls are 18 and 13 and their teeth are great too. I didn't have any cavities until I become pregnant the first time. They said the baby takes calcium from the teeth and bones of the mom. I drank my weight in milk though and always took those vitamins.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
31 Jan 12
You tried. I wonder if the saliva changes, too. Because you drank a lot of milk and took vitamins.
@hvedra (1623)
4 Jan 12
I went from the age of fourteen to almost thirty without having a cavity. Then I had one and now I'm 41. I seem to get plenty of other dental problems just not cavities! I think some of it is hereditary - I can't say I avoided sugar or acidic things - but I think your overall diet and health has an effect as well as those things that can damage the teeth directly.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
Yes, I think for most people it's a combination. Heredity and diet.
1 person likes this
@yanzalong (7879)
• Indonesia
4 Jan 12
I think it was parents' responsibilty. Children tend not to brush their teeth before they went to bed. Cavity may happen to children, whose parents pay little heed to children's teeth health. Am I right?
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 Jan 12
In some cases, but read on. We have some interesting responses that agree with that and others that have other experiences.