A friendly discussion about the difference in people's race and/or nationality

United States
January 6, 2012 7:02pm CST
I am a small town girl transplanted into the middle of a very diverse town near Chicago. I have climbed mountains in this category. I went to work in a location that was primarily black and I was so small town white girl. I was scared to death but, how wonderful it turned out to be! I absolutely love the differences in people. How about you?
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@marie2052 (3697)
• United States
7 Jan 12
I learned at an early age to love humanity for different race and cultures. I started working as a nurses aide at age 15 in a Catholic Nursing Home. My life was like a fairy tale for those three years. No not the actual work but I had 11 nuns and a Mother Superior and Priest to work for. The nun I worked directly for was Sister Concepta. I will never forget her she was the youngest of all the nuns there. Beautiful brown eyes she was from Nicuragua. I didn't know any better back then (I was pretty innocent) and remember telling her it was a shame she had become a nun she would have made the prettiest babies. (what is it they say out of the mouth of babes?) But I remember the majority of them were from Germany, and then one was from France. Everyone told me this nun never spoke to any of the girls that worked there ever. Well within the 3 years I was there I not only had her tell me where she was from (France) but also what had made her turn to becoming a nun. The day after I turned 18 (1970) I joined the Women's Army Corp or WACS as we were known then. Well lets put it this way, if you have not gotten along with others before, you were suddenly thrown into a barracks with almost 50 girls from all walks of life and whether you liked or disliked someone you figured out pretty quick that you better have each others back or you would not graduate and be recycled back to the 5th week of basic. I graduated 3rd in my basic training class We were known as C-3 Charlie company 3rd platoon. There was no way I was going to be recycled! But I do remember a couple of girls being recycled to our platoon when we were starting our 5th week (it was called Hell week) and I remember all 93lbs of me walking up to these girls and telling them if they thought they were going to bring our platoon down we would kick their butts. It was not about color or race, we just wanted to make it through basic and were not going to deal with someone that might bring our spirits down to get us through. After basic and AIT training, I was being sent to Walter Reed. Well I was so excited because in the military as you go in you did a so called dream sheet. Its name three places you would like to go. I was in the medical field so I had only ever heard of Walter Reed being the most prestigious Army hospital at that time. So when I found out I was being sent there, I was so excited. When I went home and showed my parents my orders my dad thought I was talking about Washington State. I said NO DAD where the Presidents are D.C. He looked at me and told me to tell the Army to change my orders. I thought he was crazy. I asked him why? He said with those racial riots going on I would get killed. I remember looking at him and saying, Dad I just come out of Basic and AIT training. I seriously doubt if anything else bad can happen to me! I can tell you I spent many hours in D.C. back in the 1970's and never once had any trouble with anyone. So yes my list can go on and on how different cultures and races can really be civil and respect each other. I genuinely do. In fact I always said if I had lived during the Civil War I would have been one of the runners to help free the slaves and hide them out. Now you know why I went in the Army...I genuinely went because of Vietnam at that time. I had to go because I had a medical background and I could not see myself doing anything else. Bless you for learning what you have too. It does not take much to learn pride and respect of others. You just have to have curiosity and a heart to learn.
• United States
7 Jan 12
Thank you for sharing !