There has to be a way.....

United States
January 9, 2012 10:10pm CST
Ok, now maybe this is just me watching way too much television; partly because I work from home and there isn't much else to do between calls lol. Or maybe I just watch way too many cartoons. But I have noticed that many the Turner Networks have gotten lazy when it comes to showing Seth McFarlane's shows. If you have enough time, have cable, and just happen to like the show, you will notice that the same episode of Family Guy will actually play several times throughout the week. I'm not talking about the newly released episode of Family Guy, which plays first on Fox, then is shown a bit more explicitly on Adult Swim on Monday of the next week (yep, I watch that much TV lol). This is something I expect and actually like, because it gives me a chance to watch it again if I miss it first run. I'm speaking of the reruns. You'll see an episode of FG on TBS one day, and within the same week it will play on Cartoon Network and maybe even on Fox late night. Its even worse with American Dad. Today I watched an episode of AD this afternoon before I went to lunch on TBS; this same episode was shown this evening on Cartoon Networks Adult swim! Come on are you even trying??? Maybe its asking a bit much, but dangit Ted Turner owns every last network that Seth's shows are shown on (say that 3 times fast lol), and while AD may fall shy of this, isn't there enough dang episodes of FG to not show the same episode twice among all the networks in a region? I've never claimed to be good at math, but there's an equation in there somewhere, and I believe there's a way to work it out. So tell me, have you noticed how lazy Turner's programming execs are being, or is it just me being nerdy lol? Is it mathematically possible to not show an episode twice during the week across all Turner stations it currently shows, or am I just way off base?
2 people like this
3 responses
@KrauseHome (35026)
• United States
9 Feb 12
Personally they probably do it this way just because of the time it would take to keep everything seperated. Since they are such a Big company with a lot of different channels, they probably just pick a couple of shows they want to show each week, and then show them. If it happens to be the same ones on each channel they are hoping that not too many people will take time to notice. I know when I am watching something if it is one I have recently seen, or one I have even seen just this last week I usually end up changing the channel and looking for something else to watch as well. For me it just seems easier.
1 person likes this
• United States
9 Feb 12
I guess I've become too much of a creature of habit. When it comes to television, I like having a set weekday schedule where I change the channel at certain times. i.e: When I get up in the morning I watch the news on Fox19 until 10am, from there I go to LifeTime to watch Will and Grace until 11am, then Judge Mathis until the Noon news on CBS. It may help to become a bit more flexible, because whenever a channel decides to change its lineup it throws me completely off, and I have to find something else just as worthy to fill the time slot. Back to Seth McFarlane and Ted Turner. I understand that it may be a lot of work, but specifically with Family Guy I believe that they could just assign different seasons to each station to start from. If each showed them progressively from that point, then they should keep from bumping into each other.
@KrauseHome (35026)
• United States
29 Mar 12
Personally I have noticed this too, and it is hard to ever get a chance to see one that you have missed, as they keep on showing the same ones all the time. How many times do you have to watch them want to kill Louis, or some of the other episodes many of us have seen 1 million times it seems. You would think they would find ways to be a little more creative.
1 person likes this
@sukumar794 (5047)
• Thiruvananthapuram, India
11 Jan 12
Watching TV programs of interest is enlivening, but too much of it could be detrimental both to body and mind. To be selective in viewing TV programs is the alternative.A decision and that too a firm one has to be taken towards achieving this good end.
1 person likes this