Candies replaced coins in local food stall

Philippines
February 21, 2012 12:56am CST
Have you ever received a candy in stead of a peso? Someone I sent to the store did and I was fuming mad when I found out about it. Since when is a candy considered legal tender in our country? Will they accept the candy as a peso if I came back to their store and paid for the goods that I bought from them with the candies that they gave me as change? Or will jeepney drivers accept candy as payment for my fare? I don't know about jeepney drivers or bus conductors but I won't take candy in place of the peso. When I won't tolerate cashiers in malls shortchanging me for 25 centavos, how much more for a peso? Will you accept a candy in place of your peso?
16 responses
@beamer88 (4268)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
It's actually against the law to do that. The Department of Trade has been encouraging consumers to report incidents like this. The problem though is a lot of people think it's a big inconvenience to report it just for a few centavos. They think it's not worth the time. I'm guilty of this actually. Sometimes to the point of not accepting even the piece of candy anymore. I know it's a wrong attitude. The next time though, I'll be more firm on my consumer rights :)
1 person likes this
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
I did not know about this law, beamer88. I guess it is best that we always stand by our consumer rights. Edmund Burke said ‘The only thing necessary for the triumph [of evil] is for good men to do nothing. If we will not stand up for what is right, not only for our rights, then we allow evil practices to continue.
@beamer88 (4268)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
It's actually stated under the Consumer Act of the Philippines (Republic Act 7394), and it is actually punishable. The owner of the store can be fined from 500 to 300,000 pesos depending on the other circumstances involved.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
I wonder how these unscrupulous store owners and cashiers would react if such a law were quoted to their face?
@laniekins (4585)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
I think it's a trend now in the Philippines, I first encounter it in a local grocery store. Yeah, it's ok first but now I think I need peso more than candy for transportation fare right.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Yeah, if we are a peso short of eight pesos, that is seven pesos, then we won't have enough for at least the minimum fare. Imagine how the driver will react and what kind of looks we would get from the other passengers if we give the driver seven pesos and a candy instead.
@laniekins (4585)
• Philippines
22 Feb 12
That's true, every peso counts. I can't imagine paying the driver coins with candies, sure enough they will never accept it. Candy is good but we need cash!
@berting600 (3458)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
I have also experience that in the nearby grocery store.I have ask the cashier why they do it and just quote that they lack some change to give that they just give out candies instead of the real change.It is not equal to a peso per candy but the equal change was only in twenty five centavo coins.It is alright for me if it is just 25 centavos but if it is already more than that I would give it back and instead give her some change I got from my wallet so that she could give me an exact change.
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
It is good is we always have the exact change in our wallets but in case we don't, I do not think we should put up with this practice of giving candies or short changing the customers. We have the right to our money even if they are merely cents because if every one would not fight this scheme then they would continue to rob us of our coins. I read somewhere that sometimes the mall owners are the ones who refuse to give change fund to their cashiers and they insist on having centavos in their price tags! Wouldn't it be better if they round off their prices?
1 person likes this
• Philippines
22 Feb 12
If you let these grocery stores round off their prices so that a solid price is seen, you just made them more richer.Remember that they are business men who sold these products with huge profits.That is why when I tend to go shopping I am making ready that I have some loose change to pay the exact amount to avoid the change with the candies included.This is a part of our daily living to avoid,so we must always be cautious anything and it could also avoid us from arguing the cashier the next time around.Bringing some change in the wallet is not too heavy to carry,so why not bring out some to make your day more favorable and enjoyable with your family.
@donsky14 (5963)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Oh yeah, I've experienced this a lot of times. Its what they do when they don't have any change. Sometimes they don't even ask if its okay to just give a candy instead of a 1 peso. They just assume that its okay.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Yes, some are indeed presumptuous! That is why we should always count our change because some of them would simply short change you without asking if it is okay if they don't have enough change. Someone I know would really insist on having the cashier make a way to come up with the exact change. After all, even if the customer is not always right, he is still the customer!
@kheydia (883)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Well i have experienced it many times before as a kid, sometimes the cashier didn't bother to ask you if you want a candy for a change sometimes they do that to kids although they have few coins inside their drawer, that is some bad habit of SOME filipino's that is very disgusting and need to change...
1 person likes this
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Oh yes, I heard that school canteens do this disgusting practice to helpless students. This is some sort of robbery, right?
20 Mar 12
im not in favor when some cashier in small store is tendering our change into a candy. 1peso is a big deal in our generation, even before time. Maybe that cashier is only making an additional selling strategy to make additional profit to the store.thats a bad market selling strategy. Its a form of forcing to take the candy as change even we dont like candy.no choice.or maybe because us filipino has this kind of attitude also.
20 Mar 12
im not in favor when some cashier in small store is tendering our change into a candy. 1peso is a big deal in our generation, even before time. Maybe that cashier is only making an additional selling strategy to make additional profit to the store.thats a bad market selling strategy. Its a form of forcing to take the candy as change even we dont like candy.no choice.or maybe because us filipino has this kind of attitude also.
@dazzledlady (1624)
• Philippines
1 Mar 12
HI there ! well its been going on since i learned to count. Candies as change indeed it can make our eyebrows raise a bit but it is still better than giving you no change at all for certain centavos. example 90 pesos and 20 centavo. It became the cashiers choice to give you 25 cents or none at all. Only in the Philippines? I dunno, but im more you have experience that also.
@xtedaxcvg (3191)
• Philippines
1 Mar 12
Well, if the store forced you to accept the candy instead of money then I guess that's the big deal. Those stores should first ask if you would like to instead get candy as change because they do not have enough change. Another thing, they should have lots of change to begin with since that is the nature of their business.
• Marikina, Philippines
28 Feb 12
Oh. I do not know. I do not care if it is a candy. As for me, it is okay if it is only one peso. It is just only one peso but if more than one peso, I would say that it is wrong. Example the change is P100.00. It is wrong if the cashier would give us change, which is candy equals to P100.00, but as for me, I really cannot blame them because they could not give us the exact change. What can you expect from them? They find the perfect alternative to give us the exact change and that is the candy. Therefore, if they do not have change money, we should give them the exact amount of money to them or we should give them money that they could give us the exact change.
@bing28 (3798)
• Philippines
27 Feb 12
It happened to me many times, I just ignore it however as it happened only when my change is 10 or 25 centavos. If it's one peso however,that would be a different story.
• Philippines
22 Feb 12
YES! alot when i was in high school sigh and elementary... if only i was brave enough to say "Hindi! candy and peso ko miss!" then i would say it frankly but no... I was too shy and she say "Candy na lang ha wala na kasi akong panukli" sigh....
@alberello (4755)
• Italy
21 Feb 12
This discussion reminds me of when I was a child. I was impressed that one day my mother went to buy in a grocery store. The shopkeeper, probably not having cash in the coins needed to make change, then to my mother gave it to 2 or 3 candies. I, per day of today would not accept candy instead of the rest in cash! Unless this is just a few eurocents (I'm Italian, the euro is our currency).
@choybel (5059)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
I wouldn't go as far as being really mad for it but I see your point. Definitely,they should have thought about having to accept candy as payment if they were actually giving it as change in exchange for monetary value. You should have raised this question to them. I would have loved to hear their answer to that. Hahaha! Well, this happened to me in some store but it was more like in exchange for 25 or 50 cents, so it wasn't a big deal for me. I would rather receive a candy than have short of change. I get mad when jeepney drivers overcharge me for my fare or lack change.
@masang (295)
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Due to scarcity of coins like 10 and 25 cents, some grocery store give candies. But I have not experienced a peso worth of candies as change, only 25 cents.
• Philippines
21 Feb 12
Yes, I had. I do have a countless experience of it. I used to find it so annoying if they'll use candies as a way to exchange my coins. But else can we do, there is an issue about the scarcity of coins here in the Philippines. It's not the Food stall fault as well. I'll just accept it instead of creating some issue.