Has anyone heard Michelle Obama speak

United States
March 16, 2012 5:30pm CST
about the 'pink slime' possibly coming to schools near you? Her husband had time to call and encourage Ms. Fluke who wants you to buy birth control pills, but so far, I haven't heard from Mrs. Obama about her favorite project - interferring in school lunches. Has anyone else heard her speak on it?
1 person likes this
4 responses
@Runite (307)
• United States
16 Mar 12
I haven't but I think it's related to obesity or fat.
1 person likes this
• United States
16 Mar 12
Since the pink slime is made up of fat, it pretty much does have something to do with health.
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@sierras236 (2740)
• United States
16 Mar 12
Nope. Her silence is deafening on the subject of pink slime. She ptobsbly read that the color pink doesn't exist. So by that logic, pink slime in school lunches doesn't exist either. http://news.yahoo.com/video/whoknew-19124225/color-does-pink-actually-exist-28629546.html Yeah, let's ignore the fact that pink is created by adding white to red and not mixing red and violet which even a kid's show will tell you is really magenta. But we shouldn't sully this discussion with actual logic. If she really wanted to reduce obesity, it is not the school lunch she should be attacking but the lack of recess and P.E. that all experts say kids need more of. Plus, there should be extra incentive (aka tax breaks) to get kids involved in their local sports clubs.
• United States
16 Mar 12
*probably
• United States
17 Mar 12
And, we, the parents should be holding court at PTA meetings and calling special meetings to be darned sure our kids get physical education. Along with that, we should ban usage of electronic toys like cell phones, and, yes, even computers, or at least cut the usage down to an hour a day. Then we should take our little darlings and, if necessary, show them how to play physical games that require running, hopping, skipping, jumping, etc. It couldn't hurt to teach them to talk to each other without benefit of texting too.
• United States
17 Mar 12
You are absolutely correct about the parent's role in physical health. But in order for Michelle Obama to play a part she needs to tackle something that is legislative. Of course, her silence on this matter is still quite deafening.
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
17 Mar 12
Any health expert will tell you that simple changes in diet alone will not make a great difference. What needs to be done is we need to have children more active. The idea of understanding the feelings of the children and encouraging them to be non competitive. For example when my son was in Basic Training the recruits were told that if they got tired on the daily runs they could stop and be picked up by the truck and it would not be held against them. Several of the recruits commented to my son that they were not quitters and would never take the ride. There were a few seem to take the ride most days. Their attitude was that they did some and that was good enough. When I hear little children getting praised for playing in the game even though they their team lost and the child didn't even try. At the end of the season all children are given awards as if they were the MVP of the season. In physical Education the idea of life long activities has take over. Students learn such strenuous activities as checkers, backgammon and other board games. In some cases they do teach more active games such as badminton, or ping pong and if you don't want to play you can keep score. Children are being taught that being there is good enough and it is not important to win just show up.
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
17 Mar 12
It really is pathetic how schools have done that to children. I remember when I was a kid they would say "It's not whether you win or lose, it's how you play the game." Well if you just show up and don't put any real effort in, than it's how you're playing the game that's absolute crap. Even in the NFL if you play the game well enough there is recognition despite losing. Barry Sanders played on one of the worst teams in the NFL his entire career, but he played like a champion. Now schools have decided it's more important to be sensitive to the overweight, lazy, and timid children instead of pushing them to be more athletic. The war on obesity isn't going to be won in the cafeteria, it can be won on the playground. If the kids cry over losing I say that's great. Let them learn to get over it. If you never lose as a kid, how will you ever learn to deal with failure as an adult?
• United States
17 Mar 12
There is a boatload of truth in both of your statements, with one little exception. It isn't just the schools, it's also the parents. My mom used to literally toss me outside to play. We played soldier, cowboys, games like Red Rover, hopscotch, etc. Today, we buy our kids every conceivable electronic device that will do everything for them, including electronic pets that don't even require walking them. We are the primary culprits in allowing the schools to get away with dumbing down our kids in every way from academics to sports. I actually heard yesterday of parents who got together because they thoroughly disagreed with new textbooks that took out an enormous amount of our history. Surprise! Once the parents got involved, the schools changed the book to one that kept our precious history in tact. When will all of us get together and demand that our children be forced to be their best instead of barely getting by? Only then will the school backtrack on what they are doing. Hugs, Maggie
@peavey (16876)
• United States
16 Mar 12
Not a word. This is an excellent example of... hypocrisy? or something. I'm not sure what to call it. If Michelle Obama really cared about kids's health, she'd be all over this. Politics. I think that's the word.
• United States
17 Mar 12
Aye, my dear, it is, indeed, politics and not at its best. Hugs, Maggie