Which travel guides do you like?

@Porcospino (18599)
Denmark
April 11, 2012 10:31am CST
When I visited the library I borrowed some of their guidebooks about Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. My first choice is usually is Lonely planet and I already bought Lonely Planet's guidebook about southeast Asia, but I like read some of the other guidebooks as well and compare the information in the books. In addition to Lonely planet my local library has Footprint and Rough guides and a few Eyewitness guides. The most popular travel guidebook in my country is a guidebook written by local authors. My husband likes them, because they are in Danish. He doesn't like to read the English guides, because there are too many words that he doesn't understand. The Danish guidebooks are popular in my country, but I don't like them. They leave out most of the practical information that you need as an independent traveller for instanse information about public transportation from one area to another, and I don't find them very useful. Which travel guides do you use and why? Which travel guides are popular in your country?
3 responses
• India
24 Jul 12
I also enjoy reading travel guides especially those leading to game reserves, forest and archaeological sites. I like visiting this places and I love it more when we don’t have a tour guide. There are travel guides written by wildlife organisations in my country and I never stop fetching them wherever they are anytime I want to travel.
1 person likes this
@Porcospino (18599)
• Denmark
24 Jul 12
I also like to read travel guides about wildlife. There is nothing like that in my country, but I would like to explore the wildlife in Africa or in Asia. In Africa I would like to visit Kenya and Tanzania and I also think that Madagascar must be an interesting place to explore. Some of the animals in Madagascar don't exist anywhere else in the world. In Asia there are also many different options. I think that I am fascinated by this topic, because it is so different from my own country.
@maximax8 (28560)
• United Kingdom
16 Apr 12
In my home country book shops and the Internet sell Lonely Planet, Rough Guides, Eye Witness, Lets Go, Footprint and Thomas Cook travel guide books. There are many other ones too like from smaller publishers. It all depends on the destination. My favorite travel bookshop is in Bristol, England. It was a shame when Thomas Cook stopped doing the world travel timetable. It is information I need as an independent traveler. I usually use Lonely Planet travel guide books. For my latest trip to read before I went I got Lonely Planet Argentina, Lonely Planet Chile, Lonely Planet Brazil and Lonely Planet South America on a shoestring. I only took on my trip the Argentina guide and the shoestring guide due to all the books being heavy. I put a guide to Buenos Aires on my e book reader. It was from Rough Guides. I just came back home yesterday from South America.
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@Porcospino (18599)
• Denmark
16 Apr 12
I don't know Lets Go and Thomas Cook travel guide books. Sometimes we can find Eye Witness, Rough guides and Footprint at the libraries, but the local bookshops in my area don't sell them. There are only two travel guides to choose from: Lonely Planet and the Danish guidebooks. Some years ago I visited the UK and I was surpriced to see the selection of travel guide books. It was very different from my own country. The Danish guidebooks are really popular here, and I must admit that I don't understand why they are so popular. I have tried to use them, but they left out important information that you need as an independent traveller and I did not find them useful. I think that Lonely Planet is much better.
@jureathome (5363)
• Philippines
16 Apr 12
I always go for Lonely Planet, because their write ups and commentaries are really direct and honest. If they don't like the place, they say so. Although, I noticed that their preference are generally the back-packer type, but most of their recommendations are acceptable.
@Porcospino (18599)
• Denmark
16 Apr 12
I agree with that. I also prefer Lonely Planet, and I have been using their guidebooks for years. I like the fact that they give you honest information about the different places. The Danish guidebooks that we have in my country are different from Lonely Planet, and I don't get same kind of honest information from those guidebooks, because they only write the positive things. Yes, backbackers seem to be their target group, but I still find their information useful. It is really nice that they include a lot of practical information like how to get from one place to another, because I am an independant traveller and I have to arrange my own transportation.