A rose by any other name.

@writersedge (22579)
United States
May 3, 2012 2:38pm CST
I remember back in July of 2011 when I had my operations to take out my bladder and take a section of my colon to make a new bladder while sewing my colon back up. 7 hrs of surgeries with two teams working. My Dr. kept calling it a neobladder. So people came into my room and were saying,"She's the lady with the Indianna Pouch." I said, "No, I'm not. I have a neobladder." Someone said, "That's the type of neobladder you have. Same thing in other words." Now that would have been nice to tell me before I came to and made people go double check stuff. How was I supposed to know that a neobladder and an Indianna pouch were used interchangably by my Dr.s. Dr. P says neobladder and the guy who shook my hand before surgery and I didn't see again until a month later says Indiana pouch and he was the one who filled in my charts. So has terminalogy caused problems for you before? People calling things the same thing, but you thought it was different? Like in my family, a pail was small and a bucket was bigger. So people would go send me to get a pail, but I didn't see any, I just saw big buckets. But most people consider them the same thing. Or like I consider a davenport to be a big couch, a sofa to be a medium-sized couch and a loveseat to be for two people. But couch is for all of them. But most people use all of them interchangably and I don't get confused by that. Because I'm usually looking at it when they tell me to go sit on it and there is usually only one of them in the room. So what words confuse or confused you?
2 people like this
5 responses
@JohnRok1 (2051)
4 May 12
Well, you know these words that mean different things, depending on which side of the pond you are: closet, trunk, homely, etc.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
6 May 12
That would be homey here. Homely means not good looking. Nicer than ugly. I know the trunk-boot thing. I don't call it a John, dated too many Johns, Jons.
@JohnRok1 (2051)
7 May 12
Thanks for that - I didn't know the word "homey". If I tried using it here, they might think I was talking referring to something else beginning with h o m. How did you date those Johns and Jons? C-14? Potassium argon? (Just joking - the term did begin its life your side of the pond, but we've known what it means for many years) I would have thought the only sensible reason for not calling a John would be if John happens to be your current escort. Or don't you relate to the sticker girls put on their cars over here: "No wonder they call us birds. Look at the worms we pick up!"
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
8 May 12
Well, seldom is a woman called a chick here, but a few people do call women chicks. We do have other sayings like that. Mostly, "The more I know men, the more I like my ___________(insert cat, dog, parrot, fish-whatever)"
@KrauseHome (34706)
• United States
8 May 12
This is an interesting way to look at things, and I can often see the confusion. I have heard people refer to couches as Davenports, and I always thought they meant smaller ones like maybe just a little wider than love seats, but I guess overall it would be the person using the word you would have to ask. I am sure as in Medical terms a lot of things can be different or the same depending on the doctor and who is using the words as well.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 May 12
The problem was that the Dr. who always spoke to me always said neobladder, but the Dr. who wrote the orders wrote Indianny pouch. I think there was a generation problem since the Dr. who spoke to me was in his 60s and the one who wrote the orders was in his late 30s. Yes, vocablulary was a big thing in may family. More than most.
1 person likes this
@KrauseHome (34706)
• United States
9 May 12
Well, that is often the issue with Age gaps even with Doctors. Sometimes the ones who are really in touch and more knowledgeable with a persons Health situation are more the ones to lean on for sure. I know many times it can be interesting from one doctor to the next, and what you really can count on and believe in, but have hope that one of these days it will all work out for the Best.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
10 May 12
I keep thinking there has to be some kind of purpose in all this.
@GardenGerty (95546)
• Marion, Kansas
3 May 12
Nothing comes to me right off the top of my head.I would have got the bucket, probably. My love seat is not a couch. I can identify with the hematoma comment, though. I often wonder if Mueslix is the same as granola though.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 May 12
Yes, Mueslix I believe is another word for granola in yet another language.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 May 12
that depends on the love seat. If it looks like a smaller couch, it is to me, but if it doesn't resemble one, I can see your point. My husband is going to make an Adirondack Love Seat and that won't be a couch.
1 person likes this
@JohnRok1 (2051)
4 May 12
There is actually a difference between granola and muesli and at least one firm in my country markets both. Granola is baked, whereas muesli is uncooked. Also honey is an essential component of granola, but not of muesli.
1 person likes this
• United States
3 May 12
Yes, I hate the double entrada when it comes to medical terms. Like hematoma...its a bruise. Why couldn't you just say bruise? Hemotoma sounds so much worse. It can also cause lots of confusion between you and doctors when you have picked up some medical terms along the way, but not others. I remember telling one doctor that I was on the B.R.A.T. diet...which is bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast for tummy's that are having a hard time working properly. He was at first accusatory to me saying 'how do you know that term?!' like I was a stalker in the medical book or something. lol. I said, I took Psych 101...that is in there under health..I am not an idiot. lol.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
3 May 12
It's in the newspaper, B. R. A. T. diet under the Dr's column. Does he think he's cornered the market in knowing things? Geesh! Yes, the first time someone told me I had a large hematoma, I thought I had something horrible!. Coma, carcenoma, etc. None of those are good and they rhymn with it, you know?
• United States
3 May 12
Yeah I ended up leaving this dr. after he claimed that I just need to find a nice boy, get pregnant, and everything would balance out right in my body and I would get the attention I needed. WOW. Almost 3 years later...I still am not diagnosed....but they most assurdely have dr.s that know I am not wanting attention, or a balance of hormones from pregnancy...geez is right.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 May 12
Wow! That's like the Social Worker I threw out of my house because she told me to get pregnant so I could fit the poverty guidelines to get a new roof for the trailer I was living in. Or the Dr. that told me to take up knitting when I got hurt in Martial Arts. Just a dislocated toe and a pulled hamstring.
@allknowing (60260)
• India
3 May 12
I had this problem when my physiotherapist was with me guiding me. 'Now you can go prone', 'Now supine please'He always used 'sophisticated' terms for everything else too. Could he not have just said lie down with your face up or your face down. Or lie down on your back or whatever. So simple for lay people like me!. But I did learn these expressions and I now use them when I guide others!. I feel sophisticated! No doubt your topic is about 'the rose by any other name' but you had a difficult time with that surgery?
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 May 12
Which surgery? I've had so many.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
4 May 12
Oh the neobladder, no, I was unconcious for the surgery. It's supposed to take 7 to 9 hours so it went fine. Had it been longer, there would have been complications. Coming back from it was difficult. Took almost the entire 9 1/2 days that they gave me to come back from it. But I didn't need a home nurse.