Flotsom From Tsunami After a Year at Sea

@debrakcarey (19924)
United States
June 7, 2012 8:48am CST
An entire DOCK that broke loose from its moorings in Japan last spring when the tsunami hit, has washed up on a beach in Oregon, USA. It was huge and covered in seaweed. Officals in Oregon tested it for radioactivity before allowing people near it. There has been small things wash up, soccer balls for instance. And large predator fish are showing an increase in radioactivity. And even milk cows on the east side of America are giving milk that tests positive for radioactivity. Should we be alarmed?
3 people like this
6 responses
@PageTurner (2827)
• United States
7 Jun 12
Hello debrakcarey I have been keeping up with this flotsam as well. It is amazing that something so massive as that concrete dock was washed ashore so far away. The radioactive sealife is, of course, disturbing. I am of the opinion that of course we should be alarmed, even if not a single piece of flotsam, radioactive or otherwise, made it to our shores. Even if the radioactive sealife did not make it into our waters, I am still alarmed. Fellow Earthlings are suffering from the Japan natural disaster. People are hurting and suffering. The Japanese people are looking at a threat to their way of life for years to come. I am alarmed when I hear of the suffering of people, no matter if they are not my own nationality, and no matter if their problems have anything to do with my life. Of course, as we know, the world is not as big as it once seemed, and we are all of us affected by decisions or catastrophes that take place all over our planet. This, too, is alarming and all the more reason for us to care for each other without regard to nationality. Peace.
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
I agree, we are all one big family it seems. I just wish we could all get along better. I am concerned, but other than going there and helping clean up, which many Americans did, what can we do? I pray for those in the world who are hurting, I donate to efforts when there is a disaster. But I also am concerned with me and mine. And having something that I can do nothing about worries me greatly.
• United States
7 Jun 12
It appears that you are doing much of what you can do for you and yours -- staying informed is very important. Also, it occurs to me (and I am being serious) that perhaps our investing in a Geiger Counter for home use might not be a bad idea? I don't know how expensive these things are, but it would be interesting or perhaps too scary, to utilize such a thing in the grocery store?
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
? hmmm, not sure if I could afford one, never really priced one. I can just see me now, going down the aisles with it. My daughter thinks I'm nuts looking for high fructose corn syrup in everything I buy.
@Rollo1 (16685)
• Boston, Massachusetts
7 Jun 12
I think we should be alarmed about the debris, its size and volume - but not about the radioactivity. Even in Japan, there are no reports of massive deaths due to radioactivity from the nuclear plant - except for those workers who bravely were inside the plant, working to avert disaster. The same can be said of Chernobyl, where the only deaths directly attributable to the disaster were the workers inside the plant. Although there is much speculation about possible long-term effects, there is no hard evidence available from past accidents, even those as dire as Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. Do we know that the milk on the east side of America gave milk that didn't test positive for radioactivity before the earthquake in Japan? Is milk regularly tested for radioactivity? And always remember that what we know or don't know is often manufactured by those who want to shape opinion. So some scientists, organizations and news outlets will paint a very dire picture because they are anti-nuclear. Ann Coulter will go to the other extreme and tell you that radiation is actually good for you. The truth lies somewhere in between. The most disturbing fact is the one that no one is talking about and no one seems worried about. And it is not the number of nuclear plants in the US. It is the high concentration of nuclear power plants built along the fault lines in California. Have a look at the map: http://www.iwatchnews.org/2011/03/18/3700/regulators-aware-years-understated-seismic-risks-nuclear-plants If regulators allow nuclear reactors to be situated on or near seismic faults, are they really worried about a meltdown? Is it all a scare tactic to work towards preventing us from switching to nuclear power? Or is it part of some conspiracy to actually destroy large parts of the country and reduce our surplus population? Or are they just stupid? Given that they are government employees, I opt for the last possibility.
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
You have certainly thrown some great questions into the mix. I have no answers though. I am so overwhelmed by what is diliberatly done to our food supply, I cannot begin to contemplate what is accidently done. But your pointing out that nuclear plants are concentrated on fault lines is very disturbing. ACH! I should not have gone here. See, I should stick to politics! lol
@Rollo1 (16685)
• Boston, Massachusetts
7 Jun 12
If this discussion were in politics, I would point out that President Obama promised that no radiation from Japan would reach US shores. Ooops! As for radioactive milk - well, this might be worrisome to every baby boomer for it appears we had just such a rise in low-level radioactive elements in pasteurized milk in the early 60s as recorded in these charts measuring radioactivity in air, water and milk following nuclear tests: http://www.epa.gov/radiation/docs/federal/frc_rpt6.pdf See figure 5 in the report, page 23. Levels spiked quite a lot. So, take heart. You probably drank more milk in the early 60s than you do now and you are still alive. I know I drank more milk in the years 61-64 than I do now, because I am old and my system doesn't process it as well as it did when I was a tot.
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
I could post it in politics, if you think anyone would respond. lol I did not realize that the nuclear testing caused our food supply to have radiation levels that high. I'm sure they lied about it back then. And I'm sure they lie about what is 'acceptable levels' even now. It's those reactors sitting on fault lines that will bug me for days on end now. ARE those with PhD.s really THAT stupid?
@CODYMAC (1357)
• San Diego, California
8 Jun 12
Hello. I did see this, but thought that since I live about 2 hours away, I should just go and take a look myself. But, I saw the pictures, and that is good enough for me. I have never been to the coast here and this would have been a great excuse to, but, I would have just wasted money I dont really have. But I dont think that we should worry yet. I think that we have some percentage point of radioactive something or other, (the technical term) that we ingest. Isnt that right? That is what I heard anyway. It may be that I heard that because I was raised just 5 miles from the INL in Mud Lake, Idaho.
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
8 Jun 12
Here's how I look at the danger side of it. We are told that the sun's ultra violet rays damage our skin's DNA, cause wrinkles & skin cancer. How much more the radioactivity we 'ingest' by being near it for extended periods of time. It may not kill you soon, but all it takes is on little particle to hit the right cell, and viola'-you are going to develope cancer?
@CODYMAC (1357)
• San Diego, California
9 Jun 12
Yes, I see your point. It is odd that living so close to a site for nearly 12 years didnt make me stop and question. How was I to know if any of it leaked into our water supply. They probably would never tell us because we were, and still are, just a bunch of dumb hicks to them anyway...
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
9 Jun 12
That is exactly why we need to be aware and take the responsibility of looking out for ourselves seriously.
@Soniasony (1827)
• India
7 Jun 12
These things are sometimes hard to predict.But authorities have to assume such kinds of disasters which would have occurred in the past.radio activity is really a biggest hazard.I guess all related regions should be on high alert.
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
Has any of the debris come around the bend (so to say) and washed up on the shore in India, Soniasony?
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
8 Jun 12
The world seems to be becoming such a dangerous place. I have not felt like it was until recently.
@cher913 (25890)
• Canada
7 Jun 12
i think that is somewhat alarming for sure. what can be done about this?
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
As dragon has pointed out, not a damn thing! Unfortunately, we cannot fix everything.
@Rollo1 (16685)
• Boston, Massachusetts
7 Jun 12
You can write to President Obama because he promised it would never happen. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNKNTZQMQ3g
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
7 Jun 12
And waste a stamp, at these prices? He'd deny he said it, even if you sent him that link. Actually, that is exactly why I don't trust 'experts'.
@flowerchilde (12547)
• United States
10 Jun 12
We probably should be alarmed.. about this and so very many other things.. at least with food, I believe we can say a prayer of thanks and there's a promise it is "cleansed"..
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
10 Jun 12
I am beginning to believe that that is the purpose of this life to teach us that we live it trusting only in God.