...how do I deal with these urgent projects?

Philippines
July 1, 2012 2:49am CST
Hi. My client just sent me an urgent project which he sent to me while I was working on another project of his. This is basically the second time that he had done so and I think I need to confront him about the subject. As much as I am grateful for his projects and future payments, I am beginning to feel that he expects me to do these things even on weekends. I think that he does not work on weekends and I also deserve some rest of my own. I did apply to him full time and I still deliver on those conditions. I asked for clarification in terms of scheduling (meaning, I was asking if it is possible for me not to work on weekends). But he never replied on that matter. These urgent projects are really good but I think he also doesn’t realize that we are working on two different time zones. If I catch his email (which contains the project) late, it also means that my complete set of articles are also late. I do not want tot disappoint but I also want my own time to relax and do other things. Should I catch up with his time zone or just let him stew? Also, I was experiencing computer freezes which adds to my anger and frustration. I did mention this in my last email to him How do you think I should broach the subject?
1 person likes this
5 responses
@sirnose (2440)
• United States
1 Jul 12
This is your business and you should be willing and able to do the job anytime a client need or ask for your services. A good business person never feel burdened by their workload if they're working for ones self. You sound as if you are working for someone else's company and you think that the client should have a heart and let you be off on the weekends. This is your business and if you don't want to work on weekends don't accept work that will hinder your weekends. But you should remember that this is a self employed position and you should be grateful for the continous work you get from this client.
@ruztiboy (20)
1 Jul 12
Hi fellow mylotter. Regarding your project, if I may say something about it, it's always nice to keep up to your deadlines, but remember, quality of your job will also be your boss' top concern, so while achieving the expectations of your boss, why not tell him your limitations and your personal necessities that affect the outcome of your job, it won't harm anyone of you, you're both human beings with unyielding personal needs after all . He will understand, believe me.
• Philippines
4 Jul 12
I did tell him what I ca manage with regard to quality and quantity. He’s pretty understanding about that but sometimes, I don’t expect to be bothered by an urgent project when I am already working on one of his successive projects. It brings pressure for me to do the urgent project with a great time difference (which we will also discuss I more detail). I do believe you.
@Sandra1952 (6052)
• Spain
1 Jul 12
I think you need to point out the problems that make filling urgent projects difficult, and also outline your terms and conditions. It may be that because you 'drop everything' to complete these jobs, he assumes you're happy to do it. Take the time to write a calm email pointing out the problems, and say you're happy working with him, but you feel that unless these issues are sorted out, your working relationship will be compromised. If he feels he may lose a willing worker, he'll buck his ideas up. Add a receipt option to the email, so he has to acknowledge receipt. He'll know you mean business then.
@abhi_bangal (3686)
• India
1 Jul 12
I started online writing about a couple of years ago. The very first project I got was from a person who was settled in the United States and I am from India. So, we have basically half a day's time difference. So, that is the first thing we needed to sort out. The difference in timing often causes a lot of misunderstandings. If there is only email as the source of communication, then it can go really weird. I mean, it is not possible for everyone to send an SMS, which can be read immediately on phone. But fortunately for me, I was never under the pressure of having to work with urgent projects. However, I did some urgent projects too that had less than 12 hours deadline. But the client was from India itself. We could talk on the phone too. Moreover the time zone was also the same. But in you case, I think, you should remind him again that you were not committed to working on weekends too. If you really need the job, then my friend, you have to go ahead and work. But if you can afford to raise your voice, then do it. But you run the risk of losing the job. Take a careful decision. Good luck!
• Philippines
4 Jul 12
I guess your experience is probably the closest thing to what I did experience. I did talk with my client and fortunately, it was resolved (for now). He did went on a break without notice and I set him my invoices which it turns out he never see (probably because he had a ton of emails). I cannot be sure but I kinda know that I am working for someone in the US, even though I don’t know where they are exactly (which is the reason for my problem with the time zone thing). I did have a talk with him, he responded in kind, and we kinda sorted it out. I’m back on working for him again. I hope that everything goes smoothly from here. Thank you for all the advice you gave on the matter. Really appreciate it.
@mensab (4208)
• Philippines
1 Jul 12
if the project is urgent and doable, it is advisable to do that project first. after accomplishing it, then it is time to talk with your client. in this way, you have the edge and upperhand in negotiating because you just provided him/her a completed project. it is always beneficial to negotiate with something that you have proven already. there will be less arguments against your side.
• Philippines
4 Jul 12
I already communicated with him and yes, I did the project first before bringing the subject up. I thought that I might as well have as many advantage to my cause as much as possible. The matter is now resolved as of this posting.