Gays and Chick-fil-A

@bestboy19 (5482)
United States
July 23, 2012 9:29pm CST
Intolerant: lack of toleration; unwillingness or refusal to tolerate or respect contrary opinions or beliefs, persons of different races or backgrounds, etc. Bigot: a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices; especially: one who regards or treats the members of a group (as a racial or ethnic group) with hatred and intolerance. Discrimination: the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on his or her membership - or perceived membership - in a certain group or category. Are gays as guilty of the criticisms they levy on others, intolerance, bigotry, discrimination? http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=newssearch&cd=7&ved=0CEwQqQIwBg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.seacoastonline.com%2Farticles%2F20120723-BIZ-207230306&ei=jAMOULutKabc0QHOm4CwAw&usg=AFQjCNH4taEeD2PiP2L0pF3Y6T4iVUxFPA
2 people like this
7 responses
@sierras236 (2740)
• United States
24 Jul 12
Yes, there certainly have been examples of all three from the gay community. I have had many discussion (on other forums) about this particular topic. The word "bigot" was thrown around. I had to point out that they were blatantly using it. This is America. It is okay to have different beliefs. That's why we have the First Amendment. Yeah, you can stop patronizing a company because of their beliefs but in the long run, such boycotts are very ineffective. They don't hurt the bottom line. Now, boycotts based on bad personal experience especially with customer service are an entirely different story and completely valid.
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
24 Jul 12
Have those on other forums seen your point? Bad customer service is a legitimate reason to stop frequenting a place of business as is discrimination, but Chick-Fil-A doesn't do that; so any boycott of Chick-Fil-A would be based on intolerance and bigotry of Mr. Cathy's views on marriage.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Jul 12
Some have and some are like... "Well, I don't care because I am so intolerant that I can't handle anyone's viewpoint but my own." Maybe not those exact words, but that's the gist. Of course, the really good arguments come up when I point out that Darwin's theory is also against gays joining together for the purposes of procreation. Yeah, scientists haven't figured out a way to by-pass the whole egg meets sperm even though they have changed the delivery system. Yeah, a lot of people are shocked that there are non-religious arguments out there that have a basis in Science. But that's a side issue. BTW, even if people support a cause, such as JC Penney using Ellen, doesn't mean that people are spending their money there. In a way, it is the exact same thing as a boycott because no money is actually going to the company. So unless you are actually buying things, you aren't actually "supporting" their cause. That's the whole catch-22 of supporting a company's belief system.
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
25 Jul 12
Of course they would not use those words. They would never call themselves intolerant. I wonder just how effective (or is it affective) boycotts really are.
1 person likes this
@andy77e (5170)
• United States
25 Jul 12
It's only wrong if other people do it. Not them. That's what most of them are Democrats. Democrats have the same view. It's only wrong if other people do it.
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
25 Jul 12
If enough pay attention or have it pointed out to them, they will see that those pointing fingers are just as guilty, if not more so, than the ones they are accusing. There's an old saying, "The guilty dog always barks."
@Taskr36 (13926)
• United States
24 Jul 12
I have a coworker who's gay. He complains about their anti-gay marriage stance, but still eats lunch there almost every day. Why? Because he really likes the food. He doesn't let politics get in the way of patronizing a business that provides a good product and treats him, as a customer, well.
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
24 Jul 12
He doesn't sound like someone with a double standard. It's good to know there are those who can accept the opinions of others even if they don't agree with those opinions.
1 person likes this
@ladyhill (78)
• United States
24 Jul 12
I have seen this heading several time and I did not read the story because I did not want to get upset. I am going to read it now.
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
24 Jul 12
After you read it, I'd like to know what you think.
1 person likes this
@Sandra1952 (6052)
• Spain
24 Jul 12
If the guy had said this on national television, or posted it on Facebook or Twitter, it would have been inflammatory, and people would be right to get upset about it. But he was talking to a Baptist website, and probably most of those reading it would hold similar opinions. And it is only an opinion, people. He hasn't put a sign up in his restaurants saying 'No Gays,' so why the uproar? He's allowed to hold an opinion - it's what wars have been fought for. Just because people don't agree with him, it doesn't take away his right to express his opinion, and he doesn't deserve to have his restaurants boycotted because of it.
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
24 Jul 12
Would you say the gay community was being intolerant?
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
26 Jul 12
Why can't this man express his views in any forum he chooses? If a gay person gets up and tells a group that gay marriage is good and everyone has to accept it that is fine but If I get up and say gay marriage is unacceptable to me and here is why who is being inflammatory?
• Spain
26 Jul 12
I take your point Bobmnu, and I agree that seemingly, we have to accept what the gay lobby say without question, while feeling unable to respond to it. However, I do feel it would be inflammatory if a head of a major corporation aired his views to the world. When you run big business, you have to consider the feelings of your clientele if you want to stay in business. Like you, I would be happy to articulate my views and defend them - I'm also against gay marriage, by the way - but if I was a CEO responsible to my employees and shareholders, I'd have to be more careful. If my personal views were seen as representative of the company I headed, it could cause a lot of grief to a lot of people.
@clrumfelt (5425)
• United States
25 Jul 12
Yes they are guilty in the criticisms they levy on others. The owner of Chic Filet did not refuse service to gay people, he merely stood up for his traditional Christian values. The gays attacked because of that. He didn't threaten anyone, but he has the right of free speech as well as anyone else and is allowed to express whatever values he holds. Honestly, gays that react this way to someone stating their honest views are way too sensitive. They should get the chip off their shoulders and get a life!
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
25 Jul 12
I wonder if they believe others will side with them if they making Mr. Cathy appear intolerant. The problem in this case, though is that Mr. Cathy doesn't come across as intolerant, they do.
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5425)
• United States
25 Jul 12
Ever notice how certain groups in the USA are stereotyped as being persecuted and so people accept their intolerant stances more readily without questioning them?
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
25 Jul 12
Yes I have. That's the reason some things need to be pointed out.
1 person likes this
@Tam1204 (59)
• United States
22 Sep 12
I find it interesting that when a group stands up for their beliefs, regardless of what they are, they are called intolerant or bigots. As long as the gays are quiet and don't take a stand for their rights, they are okay. When the breaking point has been reached and something is finally said in defense, it is intolerance. The standard seems to be "as long as you agree with me, I think everything is fine. When you disagree with me, I am going to call you intolerant or a bigot." Women have been talked about the same way when we they reached their point and stood up for their rights. African-American people were treated the same way when they stood for their rights. It is an on-going thing and probably will never change.
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
23 Sep 12
And when Christians stood up for their rights to free speech, they were called intolerant and bigoted. Not only that, the gays tried to put Chick-Fil-A out of business just because its founder Mr. Cathy believes in traditional marriage.
• United States
23 Sep 12
So what you are saying is it is okay to stand up for your beliefs as they match a certain format? It is okay for so-called Christians to express their feelings, but it is not okay for someone who believes differently to do so? These people who call themselves Christians are the first ones that try to do way with others right to free speech, but are also the first ones to yell when someone states and opposing opinion that their rights are being violated. You cannot oppress rights for certain groups. Either everyone has the right, regardless of what it is, or no one has it. That goes for all rights. No one has tried to put Chick-fil-a out of business. Some people have just decided that they are not going to give their money to an entity that continually supports organizations that discriminate. If they were donating to a racially motivated hate group, would you be defending them? Would you defend them if they were donating money to an atheist group? Realistically, the LGBT community could not put them out of business. Even if you took the high-end percentage of people that are LGBT (10%) out of the equation it would not happen. If that were the actual percentage of people that identify as LGBT, that is 1 out of every 10 people that enter. If you take away 1 person out ten, that leaves 9 other people still buying their product. You might reduce a profit by a minuscule amount, but you are by no means going to bankrupt them. Personal views do not belong in business. There is a business in the town that I live that I will not spend money in because every year they post political signs in the business. It is not because I dont have the same views that they do. I have supported many of the same candidates/issues in the past. I just feel that a business is not the place for it.