Whether the following sentence is correct?

@Manasha (1995)
Chennai, India
September 14, 2012 1:38pm CST
I am a native Tamil speaker who have excellent experience in translation work. The above sentence is written by me to a client for an article request. Is it correct , else some changes are needed. Please let me know. If it is wrong, please let me know how to request a client for an article task.
2 people like this
3 responses
@vandana7 (56793)
• India
15 Sep 12
I think we should have a separate category for English. I would love to read and re-read some of the clarifications in such discussions. :) Thanks for starting a good one. :)
1 person likes this
@owlwings (37889)
• Cambridge, England
15 Sep 12
It would be a good idea if we (or Admin) could move discussions to an appropriate Interest. Unfortunately, I gather that this is nowhere as simple as deleting a discussion or removing inappropriate tags! There is already an Interest "English". Now there is one for "English Language" as well.
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@Manasha (1995)
• Chennai, India
16 Sep 12
sir Whether the word police is singular or plural, I can see in some of the newspaper the word police is considered plural. What is the truth about the word?
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@owlwings (37889)
• Cambridge, England
16 Sep 12
Police is a collective noun and is treated as a plural. "The police are making arrests." Individuals are usually referred to as 'members of the police force', 'policemen/women': "A policeman called to see me today.", "A few members of the police force/police men and women were in the crowd." (but you might also hear - incorrectly - "A few police were in the crowd") The word 'police' can serve as a noun, an adjective or a verb. "The case was investigated by the police" (noun) "The man was taken into police custody. Three policemen were needed to restrain him" (adjectives) "The security firm agreed to police the event" (verb) Note that it is not usually regarded as a proper noun except when referring to a pop-group with that name or to a specific body, usually as a shortened form of an official title, or when the adjective is part of a title, as in 'Police Commissioner'.
@owlwings (37889)
• Cambridge, England
14 Sep 12
Although 'who' appears to represent the first person singular pronoun ('I') in the clause, it is actually two separate sentences with two different person numbers. The first sentence is "I am a native Tamil speaker" but the "who" refers to "[a] native Tamil speaker" and not to "I" and is therefore in the THIRD person. Therefore you should say: "I am a native Tamil speaker who has excellent experience in translation work."
@Manasha (1995)
• Chennai, India
14 Sep 12
Sir, I have two doubts in this sentence. Why we should add has instead of have Why not we add an before excellent in the sentence. please explain.
@owlwings (37889)
• Cambridge, England
14 Sep 12
I have You have He/she/it has ... &c The sentence construes as: "I am ... [something]" where [something] is "a native Tamil speaker who has ..." I'm afraid that it is quite difficult to explain WHY 'who' should be in the third person. I think you just have to accept that it is in this instance. An article is not used because 'experience' is an attribute and not a particular event in time as in "I had an interesting experience yesterday". (Also, you should have asked: "Why do we not add 'an' before 'excellent' in the sentence." OR "Why don't we ..." ... though, obviously, I completely understood your meaning. )
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@Manasha (1995)
• Chennai, India
15 Sep 12
Sir , shall we write like why should not we add an before excellent...... Is it correct form of asking ?
@riyauro (6431)
• India
14 Sep 12
I think you must write. I am a native Tamil speaker and I am excellent in translation work. Just a suggestion. no problem if you don't like it. Thanks for sharing and have a wonderful day ahead.
@owlwings (37889)
• Cambridge, England
14 Sep 12
This is an alternative - to avoid the relative pronoun altogether and to construct two separate statements joined by a conjunction: "I am a native Tamil speaker." + "I have excellent experience in translation." = "I am a native Tamil speaker and [I] have excellent experience in translation." Another possibility would be: "I am a native Tamil speaker with excellent experience in translation."
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