Would you shout at your subordinate in public for her/his mistakes?

Philippines
September 26, 2012 10:32am CST
I get annoyed with people who have an abrasive personality. I find it hard to talk to them. I notice this with one co-worker. If someone did a mistake on one documentation, would you really dare shout at that person in front of your colleagues? Would you do that if you were the supervisor? I don't feel it's right. I wasn't the one shouted at, it was my colleague who had already left the company a month ago. If you were the supervisor faced with that situation, won't you at least call someone in in your office instead of shouting at them in front of other colleagues? I don't understand why some other subordinates who openly made mistakes are seemingly selectively exempt from the supervisor's usual habit of shouting at others' mistakes. If that isn't showing favouritism, then I don't know what it is.
9 responses
@dpk262006 (52205)
• Delhi, India
14 Nov 12
Hi jol! If any of my subordinates commits any mistake, I won't shout at him/her. I would control myself and would tell him/her politely about the mistake so that next time s/he could 'correct' her/himself and do not repeat the mistake. Everyone has emotions and no body likes to be shouted at, it hurts and eventually it affects their performance.
2 people like this
• Philippines
15 Nov 12
Me too. I would take a bit of time to cool down so other people won't be affected by my anger.
@dpk262006 (52205)
• Delhi, India
16 Nov 12
You appear a reasonable person and it is a positive trait. PS - check yr PM.
1 person likes this
@HomeBase (1054)
• United States
26 Sep 12
I don't like abrasive personalities either. People who shout at other people on the job are bullies, and just like when we were kids on the playground, the bully picks on those that he or she feels safe picking on. Sometimes on a job, if a person is being yelled at in an inappropriate manner, that is life trying to teach that person a really important lesson, and that lesson is that sometimes in life one has to stick up for one's self. Even if a person leaves a job where a co-worker/supervisor is yelling at them, they are probably the type that gets yelled at by people in other situations as well. They may find themselves at their new job getting yelled at by somebody there.
• Philippines
27 Sep 12
That's an interesting observation. The comments I would hear from others is that she couldn't understand instructions, yet when she was transferred to another department under a different manager, she didn't seem to have any problem at all with her new manager. So I really found that weird. I know that sometimes it was kinda hard to make her understand sometimes but she probably just needed to be coached a little about what she was supposed to do instead of expecting her to quickly understand everything in a short period of time. Plus, what's adding to that is she has never been liked by the supervisor outside of work, so this kinda gives her more reason to easily pick on her subordinate's mistakes.
• Philippines
28 Sep 12
Yes, spot on. The supervisor did tell us before that she was bullied by other kids in school before but said that she has learned to fight them and not get intimidated by them. She basically thrived on her own in high school, her mother didn't know how to read so she had to learn to read on her own. She had to work part time also and in college got a scholarship to the US. Somehow a part of me wasn't surprised when I heard that story from her. She kinda grew up in an environment where she felt like she needed to defend herself and struggle to become a better person. I see nothing wrong with that, it's just that I find a bit of arrogance in her sometimes.
@HomeBase (1054)
• United States
28 Sep 12
Yes, I'm sure she has some arrogance to her, like she is better than other people because she is a survivor, she is probably one of those types of people that feels like she is the only person in the universe who has ever overcome difficult times. She feels that most other people are weak compared to her. What she needs to realize is just because someone does not openly broadcast all the trials and tribulations that they have personally been through does not mean that they themselves have not overcome great odds and obstacles, it's just that they have chosen to be quiet about it. This sup is probably more than a little bit jealous too, of people that she thinks did not have to struggle as hard as she did. She might feel jealous because she thinks others have had an easy life compared to her, while hers was so hard. She probably wonders why was she born into an environment where she had to struggle so much. But, even though she probably feels jealous of a lot of people, she feels superior to them. Superior (arrogant) because she thinks that she is stronger than they could ever be. She probably constantly thinks to herself, "They could never do what I have done!"
1 person likes this
@allen0187 (22340)
• Philippines
4 Oct 12
hi jolliefille. when it comes to handling situations with my subordinates, i always praise in public and criticize in private. no exemptions!
1 person likes this
• Philippines
18 Oct 12
That's good to hear. I admire people who can take things objectively professional-wise.
• United States
28 Sep 12
While shouting is quite effective in certain situations can be effective, shouting at someone in front of people causes nothing but resentment.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
28 Sep 12
Definitely. In the army I can understand why shouting is allowed.
@dorannmwin (36608)
• United States
28 Sep 12
Even if I was the boss, I don't think that I would ever be able to yell at a person for making a mistake. The reason that I would never yell at a person is because of the fact that I feel they would be less likely to make the same kind of mistake in the future if you actually take the time to explain to the person what they've done wrong and how they can keep from making that kind of a mistake again in the future. Having a more positive attitude is a much more effective way of fixing problems than yelling is.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
28 Sep 12
I agree with you. I do notice that trend often with myself and with other coworkers as well not only in this job but in previous jobs as well. I do notice that some of those supervisors who were promoted from the lower rank tend to be more understanding with what their subordinates are going through compared to those who were just assigned the job out of vacancy.
@slico79 (212)
• Philippines
27 Sep 12
If I'm a supervisor or anybody that has authority over someone, I'd rather berate to an employee in a sensible way in my office. Shouting at someone is not only counter-productive it also degrades your social status in the workplace.
• Philippines
27 Sep 12
You're right. I remember this saying that people never forget how you make them feel, so it's best to settle and talk things over with a clear head.
@pgiblett (6650)
• Canada
26 Sep 12
There is never any reason to shout at someone who works for you whether in public or in private. No matter how angry the manager or supervisor feels they should be able to hide the anger and speak in a calm and controlled manner. Having been a manager for many years I have found the best thing to do is arrange a meeting for later in the week. This way the anger relating to the situation can have time to dissipate. When I hold the meeting I ask two questions: * What happened? * How can we ensure it never happens again? The answers to these two questions are all that needs to be focused on. There is no point playing the blame game there can be no winners here.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
27 Sep 12
Ya pointing fingers should be avoided. There was this one ex coworker who had worked for the company for 16 years, some erroneous story about the location of the spare parts was told by one department head and he told the general manager about it. Apparently the general manager believed his story and the ex coworker was made to choose between being demoted to another department or resigning. He chose to resign.
@cynthiann (18572)
• Jamaica
26 Sep 12
Regrettably, this does happen frequently in countries all over the world. It shows lack of self control and good manners. Of course the person should be spoken to privately and not publicly embbarrassed and shamed in this way. My Boss was the same but when he shouted it was at me in my office or over the phone. Even now, I shudder when I remember what I went through
1 person likes this
• Philippines
26 Sep 12
I have actually been shouted once over the phone by my boss too. I felt really bad that day, like the whole day, to the point that I never wanted to wear the same blouse I wore that day. I just gave it away to my sister.
@GemmaR (8527)
26 Sep 12
I think that is always very wrong to shout at people at all. Even if they have done something wrong in their job you should be trying to help them to understand why they made a mistake rather than humiliating them in front of everyone who they work with. It is much better to have a meeting with them and take them to one side rather than shouting at them. I wouldn't even do this if I was the boss because it is very important for the whole of the workforce to be happy, and this won't be possible if some of them are being shouted at.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
26 Sep 12
Yeah, some of them are shouted at and some aren't, even if both groups did errors too. Some employers have already resigned because of that kind of behaviour from that person, though they would never openly admit it of course. And to think that supervisor did study Psychology in college. So weird. I understand that one could lose patience with people they don't initially like and still don't like presently. Still it's no excuse.