Should I be 'In" or should I be right - that's the question!

@allknowing (69306)
India
October 7, 2012 9:49pm CST
The other day I met someone after a long time and I asked her how she was and she said "I am good"! I questioned her about it and she said that's 'in' these days. Next time when someone asks me how I am should I say "I am good" or should I say "I am fine, thank you, and you?" Should I be 'In" or should I be right? Then there was another who apologised to me for something, "Oh sorry, it was my bad" she said. "My bad"? What's that? I suppose that too is an indication that she is 'In'. The list is endless. Why should I ask someone to roll on the floor and laugh or laugh out loud.I think girls should be seen and not heard!!! I have taken a decision. I would rather be right than "In" How about you? What's your thinking?Do you want to be 'In' or do you want to be right "Mind your step" when you discuss this with me!.
1 person likes this
9 responses
• United States
8 Oct 12
I don't think there's really a "right" way to go about some of the things that you've listed. I guess it just depends on who you're talking to and how formal or informal you intend to be. I say "my bad" or "my fault" a lot instead of saying "sorry" or "I apologize" depending on who I'm talking to. If my husband and I bump into each other walking down the hallway I say, "my bad" if I bump into someone at the grocery store I say "pardon me" or "I'm sorry". If someone says "I'm sorry" to me, I tend to say "you're good" instead of saying "it's ok".
• United States
8 Oct 12
I meant to add that there's no right way really. I would say just respond how you are comfortable responding. I don't think anyone would make fun of you if you are more formal in your conversation than others.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
8 Oct 12
I get your point Mscontroversy. But still I would not want to say 'my bad' even to someone who is close to me. Anyway I am just curious to know when and who adds these expressions into your vocabulary! I also notice some new ones get added and the old one's disappear!! Is the expression 'chow' still there?
• United States
8 Oct 12
I don't remember how or when I picked up more informal ways of saying certain things, I guess just over time I picked it up. If you're referring to "chow" as saying "good-bye", it's "ciao" and that comes from England, that's a very normal way of saying "good-bye" to them. It's like us saying "bye" instead of "good-bye". I've said "my bad" as far back as I can remember. I think I picked that up around high school or something. To the people I talk to on a daily basis, that's normal to us, that's just how we talk. My husband and I have room mates and when one of us is leaving, we say "all right y'all" we don't say "good-bye" or "see you later" or whatever, that's normal to us. So is saying "Whats up" when someone walks in the room. If someone says something surprising, instead of saying "oh really?" or "wow", we say "word?". I guess it's just "slang" or whatever you want to call it. But I know when and where to use it. If I'm talking to someone older than me (I'm 26) I tend to use more proper English than to be so informal. I don't think the way that I talk is "right" or "wrong", it just depends on who you're talking to and who you're around. I don't speak with bad grammar or talk like I don't have any sense, it's just certain terms that tend to be more informal. I couldn't imagine sitting around with my husband or my roommates or my friends and talking like I would talk during a job interview. I don't think that it's necessary to be so proper all the time. But then again, it goes back to who you're around, how old you are , etc.
@Asylum (48224)
• Manchester, England
13 Oct 12
There have always been terms considered as "In" because groups of people decide that it makes them seem special to be part of the popular crowd. What qualifies at the time depends on what they decide to make up, and does change quite often. There will always be people who desire to be seen or heard as part of a select crowd, but I have never been impressed with such gimmicks. They are quite welcome to use whatever type of terminology that they believe makes them sound "cool", although I am perfectly content using the language as I was taught.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
13 Oct 12
I can understand being fashionable to stay 'in' but why murder a language!? Language is meant to help understand each other and by constantly changing the expressions each time with a different meaning it will put off people who are new to the language and as you know the world is so closely connected these days. All the more reason we should have a language that the world understands. That slang words or expressions are used only between friends is not true. I was told to 'mind my step' by a tourist guide when I was in the US!
@Asylum (48224)
• Manchester, England
13 Oct 12
Slang is fast becoming the only language that many people know, and they seem to think that it is adequate because their friends understand what they are saying. Sadly it is a result of people not really being bothered to learn the language when in school. I do admit to using slang, which is natural because I learned to speak from listening to family and friends before I went to school, but at least I am also capable of using and understanding correct English.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
14 Oct 12
I read someone's response to a topic on rejection of tasks Tasks relating to writing articles will be rejected if there are grammar and spelling errors and in an article slang is banned. This user must have used slang words in the article. With constant use they become a part of one's vocabulary only to be rejected where perfect Engish is called for!
• United States
9 Oct 12
I guess I never really thought about it. I always say I'm doing good, thanks for asking and how about you? I've been doing that forever. As far as "oops, my bad" I do that to be funny...not too often, but we laugh about it when I say this. Do you really think girls should be seen and not heard?
@allknowing (69306)
• India
9 Oct 12
"Doing good"? What's that? Are you by any chance distributing your wealth to the poor? Our nuns taught us that - girls being seen and not heard! I do not believe in that and that is why that smiley there!
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Oct 12
I guess we're not that particular over here. All I can say is "my bad"..oops, there I go again.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
10 Oct 12
Have mercy on poor us Kash - not when we are around!
@obe212003 (2302)
• Philippines
8 Oct 12
I am having second thoughts of minding a discussion with you, is it right or am i in? lol! Being "in" is cool, but being "right" is far more better than being cool as it is super cool to be "right" not to be "in" unless otherwise you would really want to be "in" and be right.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
8 Oct 12
Everything that is "In" is not wrong!. Is being cool is "In" or right?
@obe212003 (2302)
• Philippines
8 Oct 12
What is "in" should not be out, lol! Being cool is quite being "in", and sometimes it is hard to assess if it is "right" though. But either way "in" or "right", i would rather stick to what i think is "right" even if it means i am not in, lol! Happy my lotting!~
@allknowing (69306)
• India
8 Oct 12
That's it. Even if you are not 'in' you will stick to what is right. That's my point too. Most of these slang words do not stick they go away with the same speed they came 'in'
@silverfox09 (4727)
• United States
13 Oct 12
Well it all depend on who and what situation we are in . Formal communication is used mostly when official meeting or when talking to strangers and you want to be polite . Informal is commonly used among friends and in certain country . I used the oerd you mention in my daily life , "My bad" , " I am good" , "That sucks" we used those when you are comfortable or close to a person . It also depend on the age group you having a conversation with . When talking to a older person are someone like a teacher then you will be more formal with them .
@allknowing (69306)
• India
13 Oct 12
There is no reason why a language should be mutilated. Language is meant to communicate and the lesser it is complicated the better it will be whether one is talking to friends or strangers.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
13 Oct 12
Talking about being formal or informal - here is a version: "Dear Mr..." "Dear Sir", "My dear ...." and a few more. None of these expressions are slang and could be used suitably used depending on how formal or informal an approach is.
@vandana7 (67581)
• India
8 Oct 12
Lets accept, language changes. As I mentioned elsewhere, once upon a time, when the kings said something nice, the subject said you are very kind sir, and somehow it changed to brief thank you. Analyzing good, it did seem logical. We greet good morning. Meaning may this morning be good to you. So when somebody says I am good, he or she is merely bringing that "good" in. We dont greet "fine morning" "fine evening". :) My bad..is again condensed slang usually found amongst youngster. I got that my bad disease from Saphy..lol
@allknowing (69306)
• India
8 Oct 12
Changes that are lasting are welcome, but not those that are here today and gone tomorrow.
@vandana7 (67581)
• India
8 Oct 12
Oh there are always those..always..intermediate varieties..nothing in our hands.
@Micmac (9428)
12 Oct 12
It is funny how strange slang words have double meanings and can cause confusion when one is unfamiliar with the slang. One slang that I hear often and I use to reply to the question "How's are you?", then I will reply " I'm hanging in there" meaning I am okay right but not the best. And then there is the expression 'I'm hanging out' when someone asks "What are you doing?" "My bad" is a common slang for "My mistake." - LOL It does sound like admitting to being a bad guy though when you take it out of context. The funny slang I hear often is 'Word" which means, "Yea, I agree, for sure."
@allknowing (69306)
• India
12 Oct 12
English is a difficult language as it is and all these slang words make it more difficult.Even native English speakers fumble. Today there is a lot of mingling and mixing of countries and sticking to the dictionary therefore would do well for one and all!. "Word"? Never heard of it!
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
10 Oct 12
I'm good with just being right..lol. I am constantly introduced to new slang from my girls, but I am ok with the way I talk. The newest thing..that makes no sense to me at all is everything is "like a boss" Someone calls and says what's up? The In response would apparently be "kicking back like a boss" My daughter says that it goes with anything but I think I'll stick with "nothing much, what are you doing?"
@allknowing (69306)
• India
10 Oct 12
How about 'my good'. Has no one out there thought about this? Everything has an opposite. Right? I dread the day when everything will be slang and poor us will be at a loss to know what these Yankees are talking about. When someone said 'mind your step' to me when I was holidaying in the US, I looked around to see if there were any boulders there! I too am doing "nothing much, what are you doing?"
@dorannmwin (36698)
• United States
8 Oct 12
When it comes to a matter of speaking, I honestly think that the best thing that we can do is to be honest when we are speaking. If someone asks us how we are doing, I believe that if we are okay, then we should say that. If we aren't really doing well, I think that we should say that. However, I don't think of using the term "I'm fine," is a way of being in and I would never think to say that it was being in. That's just like using the term "My bad," in my opinion. I like that term because you are acknowledging that you've made a mistake and that is something that all humans have a tendency to do from time to time. We are being honest in saying that we realize that we've made a mistake.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
9 Oct 12
Ofcourse if one is not fine it is not right to say that they are fine. I was merely talking about using expressions that are here today and gone tomorrow.