Why would a trained dietician say that?

United States
November 3, 2012 10:16am CST
I was watching TV last night. I happened to watch a few minutes of a show about training the new Dallas Cowboy cheerleaders. This is certainly not my idea of entertainment, so I was browsing the TV guide while this show was playing off in the corner (I was watching the show on just before this one). Well, one of the snippets I got from the show was them bringing in a registered, trained dietician to teach the girls how not to gain weight. She was saying how they have to focus on eating right to keep their energy up, etc. etc. Then she said they have to give up soda completely because carbonation causes cellulite. Now this is not something I'd heard before, and it stuck in my head. I'm overweight, and have lots of cellulite. I've also always been a heavy soda drinker. So this morning a did a search on the internet about this information and found out it was false! http://www.livestrong.com/article/308860-does-carbonation-cause-cellulite/ So now I'm wondering why a so-called trained and registered dietician would tell these girls a lie? And on national TV no less, making the entire audience believe a lie as well. I mean not that soda is good for you, of course. Even diet soda is not very good for you and the best liquid to put in your body is definitely water. I could also argue that a registered, trained dietician shouldn't be concerned about what these girls weigh since they basically have perfect bodies anyway.. But that's not the point. The point is this so-called expert dietician is giving mis-information. That just irks me!
4 people like this
10 responses
@lilybug (21148)
• United States
3 Nov 12
Kinda makes you wonder where she got her training huh? I know that soda is not good for me. I am pretty sure everyone knows that it is not good for them. I wonder if maybe she was just trying to scare them into not drinking it because of the other reasons it is bad for them. Still you are right she should not have been on television giving out false information.
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (99351)
• United States
3 Nov 12
In its earliest days soda was said to be a health food or a medicine. That was when I was little. My dad's sister was surprised when my kids were little and they preferred milk at a buffet restaurant. She said that she encouraged her kids (my cousins) to drink pop even at home, as it was cheaper than milk. Me, I grew up drinking mostly water. That is even cheaper. I do think maybe this is just a scare tactic.
• United States
3 Nov 12
I never knew that GG.. funny how things change. I wonder if someday all this health food is going to be bad for us? I think they're starting to lean away from the idea that fruits are good.. because fruits have a lot of natural sugar. Fruit will probably soon be in the junk food category!
@sedel1027 (17855)
• United States
3 Nov 12
I don't know what she'd say that. I have never heard that before. Could she have misspoken and meant that is causes water weight gain? She could have also just been using it as a scare tactics to get the girls to eat healthy and stay away from soda and all the chemicals in it.
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (99351)
• United States
3 Nov 12
I checked Livestrong and some other sites as well. It could be that she got trained when this was an accepted belief. Sedel is correct, it can cause water weight gain and it can keep the water from flushing the toxins, but sparkling water, for instance does not cause water retention. An example of "old theory" is what I was taught, I will not say how long ago. "Bacon is a healthy choice of food, it is high in riboflavin and it takes so many calories to digest it you can eat all you want and come out thinner." Of course this was in public school, but it just goes to show what kind of stuff can be offered as fact that is not. Maybe someone will call her on it.
• United States
3 Nov 12
I've never heard of carbonation causing cellulite.. but I'd think a dietician would need to stay up to date on health issues to know what is currently considered healthy and what isn't. If her information is dated, then she shouldn't be giving advice!
@jillhill (37384)
• United States
3 Nov 12
You would think they know what they are talking about...but I imagine that they were more inforcing the no soda rule then anything.....but to say it causes cellulite without proper back up information is just wrong.
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Nov 12
She didn't need to lie to point out why soda is bad.
1 person likes this
@Hatley (164654)
• Garden Grove, California
3 Nov 12
hikatsmeow oh a lot of so called dietitians re really not that well trained we have one on our staff that loads our plates with the quick to raise blood sugar carbs rather than complex carbs and calls herself a registered dietician. the reason I know quite a bit about guick to raise blood glucose versus the carbs that are dense and raise your blood sugar but a little. is I am a diabetic. we go to seminars hosted bye nurse diabetic educators and dietitian diabetic educators who taught u s about the glycemic index of foods and the best and worst carbs for us to eat. we do eat a lot of cqrbs plus somprote3in on our diets as proposed by the American Diabetes Assoc.but we are to use the slow acting cars and eat plenty of vegetables and fruits plus whole grains and lean meats too.,maybe the dietician was nutty enough to thinks that the bubbles in the sodas would get under our skin an make our cellulite even bigger this is so preposterous its hard to imagine for me
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Nov 12
That is truly a shame! Do you have food options there so you don't have to eat the bad carbs?
@WakeUpKitty (8707)
• Netherlands
3 Nov 12
Cellulite is for a big part in your dna. Ofcourse if you gain weight (pregnancy for example) you get it easier, but so can you if yo get older. Cellutlite has to do with the structure of your skin, the elasticity etc. Those so called miracles to prevent or get rid of them won't work for most of us (unless you have not 1 gr of fat at all). Why a dietician is saying such a thing I don't. You can have your doubts about what is professional (making an income with it for example). For sure is every dietician have had an other education (there are also a lot of who had no education at all) and besides of that they should study daily and read about new inventions, discoveries etc. That no dietician is great or perfect is already proved since they are not able to help everyone. They are only succesful with a certain kind of customer that fits into their own ideas/opinion. BTW I think a dietician encouraging cheerleaders to stay focused on what they eat is already wrong.
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Nov 12
Yep, I agree. I rolled my eyes when they started talking about making sure the girls don't gain weight.
@redredrose (1107)
• United States
3 Nov 12
Maybe the dietician thought it was true tho i doubt that. I agree it is very wrong for a trained licensed dietician to say such things when they are not true. Soda is not very good for you but don't lie about the side effects. If i saw this it would have irked me too. I never heard of any drink causing cellulite. I hope someone knows she lied and gets her for it because as a licensed dietician she shouldn't do that. Now drinking soda can make u have a belly from the sugar and calories and such but cellulite on your body from the caffeine i never heard of before.
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Nov 12
I hope she's caught too.. but I'm not going to watch the show again to try to find out.
@mythociate (15365)
• Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
4 Nov 12
Maybe he's not talking about 'the carbonated water,' but rather all the sugary junk the soda-people put into it. The first line of the page you gave explains it all: "Carbonation does not cause cellulite, but the calories that come along with it in sugary sodas may worsen your orange-peel skin problem." At least the dietician isn't feeding us the pharmaceutical-barf that doctors are paid big bucks to feed us---that medicine somehow 'fixes' the human body better than it can fix itself!
• United States
5 Nov 12
She did not say "soda causes cellulite" she said "carbonation causes cellulite".
@AmbiePam (49078)
• United States
3 Nov 12
I wonder if she was taught that. You know how people used to say eggs were bad for you, and now the doctors say eggs in moderation are okay? I wonder if when that woman was getting trained everyone was under that impression and she just hasn't been bothered to keep up with the current dietary information. Cellulite is supposed to be genetic as well. So if those cheerleaders are in shape and don't have it now, they probably won't unless they put on loads of weight.
• United States
4 Nov 12
I think they should have to stay on top of current information in order to keep their jobs and remain credible. Whether it was something she learned before or not, that made her look bad stating that myth on national TV.
@GardenGerty (99351)
• United States
3 Nov 12
On the subject of cellulite--I do not have it, my mother and sisters did not have it. Lots of us have been overweight. I think it is genetic. My daughter, who is tall, thin, active and does not drink soda, never has liked it to speak of, has cellulite. Must be from her dad's side of the family. On the subject of why a registered dietitian would say that--it depends on what school she got her training from. Medical and science based programs still can differ on what they teach. As old as I am I remember some of the things we learned in home ec and they are totally the opposite of what we are taught now. As far as the livestrong site goes, the authors who write there are freelance writers who may or may not have some medical credentials to get them the gig. It does not mean they really know anything. The sources cited were four to six years old, and the author did not give any credentials for her own training.I do not put much more stock in Livestrong than I do in Wikipedia. I doubt that carbonation causes cellulite, I think it is hereditary. I do think that soda and sweet beverages, whether artificial or natural do contribute things that we do not need to our diet. I believe that artificially sweetened beverages can mess up your metabolism and endocrine system and make you prone to diabetes.
• United States
3 Nov 12
That Livestrong site was only one of the places that stated that carbonation does not cause cellulite. Every site I saw said it was a myth. I'm just wondering if this particular dietician wasn't properly trained or something.
1 person likes this
• India
4 Nov 12
You are right. No one should give misinformation. many people will misleaded by this. But i want to know from you as you are good at this kind of information, how to increase body weight. because underweight is also a problem. many try mant things to add weight but no results. Heavy workout, proteinated food, etc. Would you focus on this.