Daft as a brush.

@nannacroc (4049)
November 22, 2006 4:51am CST
Why do we use the expression daft as a brush? Where did it originate? Are brushes daft?
2 people like this
6 responses
@RieRie (822)
22 Nov 06
Well Basil Brush is daft, perhaps it originated from foxes? And yes brushes are extremely daft :)
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@nannacroc (4049)
22 Nov 06
It's much older than Basil. How do you know about brushes, have you ever talked to one?
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@RieRie (822)
24 Nov 06
Of course I have.
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@luskas (3430)
• Portugal
22 Nov 06
I think they are :)))! Never heard one single one awnser me... DonĀ“t got a clue where it came thou
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@nannacroc (4049)
22 Nov 06
I know I am it's taken years of practice. I sometimes have better conversations with brushes than I do with people.
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@dorypanda (1584)
23 Nov 06
Well, I interviewed a brush recently the interview went something like this: Me: Hello brush how are you? Brush: Hello, wow a talking fish! Sorry, I'm fine thank you. Me: Yes, I'm a talking fish, but you're a talking brush, so I think we're even. Brush: Ah yes, I suppose it does, what can I do for you anyway dear fishy? Me: Well, could you possibly tell me where the phrase 'daft as a brush' comes from and could you tell me anything else about it? Brush: Ah yes, it was from the old Anglo-Saxon times, a long long time ago in a galaxy far awa...oh hang on, no, yes,no, what was I saying again? Ah yes, the old Anglo-Saxon times, the original brush was called Francoise, he was a simple fellow, not too bright and he used to come out with daft questions, such as 'if it's called 'space' why isn't it empty. And stuff like that. Me: Ah, I see, so it's basically because the original brush was actually daft then? Brush: Oh yes indeedy! Me: Thank you Brush, it's over to Hugh in the studio, Hugh....
@nannacroc (4049)
23 Nov 06
Thank you, I'm so glad you managed to interview that brush, she was very helpful.
2 people like this
@dorypanda (1584)
23 Nov 06
Well, I interviewed a brush recently the interview went something like this:Me: Hello brush how are you? Brush: Hello, wow a talking fish! Sorry, I'm fine thank you. Me: Yes, I'm a talking fish, but you're a talking brush, so I think we're even. Brush: Ah yes, I suppose it does, what can I do for you anyway dear fishy? Me: Well, could you possibly tell me where the phrase 'daft as a brush' comes from and could you tell me anything else about it? Brush: Ah yes, it was from the old Anglo-Saxon times, a long long time ago in a galaxy far awa...oh hang on, no, yes,no, what was I saying again? Ah yes, the old Anglo-Saxon times, the original brush was called Francoise, he was a simple fellow, not too bright and he used to come out with daft questions, such as 'if it's called 'space' why isn't it empty. And stuff like that. Me: Ah, I see, so it's basically because the original brush was actually daft then? Brush: Oh yes indeedy! Me: Thank you Brush, it's over to Hugh in the studio, Hugh....
1 person likes this
@dorypanda (1584)
23 Nov 06
Sorry, silly thing told me it hadnt posted!
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@nannacroc (4049)
23 Nov 06
That's ok, it's happened to all of us.
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@vhansen (2035)
• United States
24 Nov 06
I've truly never heard that expression.But I would assume it's a kin to 'dumb as a box of rocks'.Or 'bright as a burnt out light bulb'.
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@nannacroc (4049)
24 Nov 06
Yes it means the same. I usually say 'dim as a half watt lightbulb' but the meanings the same. I've never heard 'dumb as a box of frogs' only 'mad as a box of frogs'. Which has been used to describe me.
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@tibido (4081)
• Italy
22 Nov 06
it's an american expression. In Europe doesn't exist
@RieRie (822)
22 Nov 06
Umm I think you'll find it's an English expression, which is in Europe, so you're wrong :)
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@nannacroc (4049)
22 Nov 06
As I am English and have heard this expression all my life, I think you'll find Rie Rie is right and it does exist in Europe.
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