Trying to get into haiku

Greece
November 18, 2012 3:43am CST
Last week I was introduced to haiku by my cousin. If you are not familiar with haiku, it is a japanese way to right poems. They are one verse that consist of three lines, one with five syllables, the second with seven and the last one with five again, making a total poem of only seventeen syllables! It is really interesting to read, however sometimes they sound kinda funny. Since they are too small, their meaning has to be brief. I believe a lot of the meaning is lost in the translation, as the japanese culture is completely different from the western culture, so sometimes instead of the poems to sound cool or wise, in english they sound kinda weird. I would also really love if someone who knows about haiku could tell us a thing or two here on mylot! :D
2 people like this
4 responses
@Angelpink (4023)
• Philippines
18 Nov 12
Hello ! Haiku is but a very beautiful poem. It is very short but it conveys a message. The original Haiku consist of 17 syllables 5-7-5 syllables . It is a poem about nature , experiences and feelings. It made use of simple words and grammar. It doesn't rhyme . We have also the modern Haiku which has a pattern of 3-5-3 syllables and we have the free style Haiku. Haiku makes the reader interpreter , imagine the meaning of the poem . I have made a lot of it. Actually when you start writing a Haiku later on you won't notice you are already addicted to it. Give it a try friend. here's a 3-5-3 Haiku for you... I am sad lines , verses and words Haiku heals.
1 person likes this
• Greece
18 Nov 12
That's very interesting! I never thought about writing haiku myself. Perhaps I will give it a try some time. It is a form of art as poetry is in general. And since I am into many forms of arts (composing, lyrics, drawings) I am pretty sure it can be very addicting for me. Thanks for your haiku as well! Maybe I should start writing in my own language first, as it is easier for me to sort the syllables out.
@Angelpink (4023)
• Philippines
18 Nov 12
Try it now , at first it is bit difficulty because you really need to count syllables but as you keep on writing you'll get use to it and it would turn easy then. Like when i was still staring to write , i always received a feedback from the experts that my syllables were lacking or exceeded and i used to sleep very late just to be expert on it. Later on , i just realized i almost made a bible of Haiku. Cheers ..you can do it also !
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Nov 12
I learned Haiku during grade school but I was never a fan of writing poems. Haiku is a very interesting poem with few words but deep meaning. Thanks for bringing good memories through your post.
1 person likes this
• Greece
19 Nov 12
Thanks for the answer. I wish we had the chance to explore japanese culture in my school as well, but (un)fortunately i'm greek, so we have way too much poems and history of our own country, and most of the times we don't even manage to cover it in the whole 9 first years of the basic education! From Homer to the newer poets it is a long way..:P
• Indonesia
18 Nov 12
Haiku, I suddenly always hear about this lately. Maybe because the incresingly number of people who have been fascinated with Japanese culture. Well what I know about haiku is it is a poem that has a 17-syllable bound divided into three rows with each row consisting of 5, 7, and 5-syllable. Since the beginning, is often confused between the terms Haiku, Hokku and Haikai (Haikai no Renga). Hokku is the opening verse of a series of poems called Haikai no Renga. Hokku determines the color and flavor of the whole chain of that Haikai. So it becomes important, and often only makes hokku poet without writing rhymes chain sequel. Haiku can describe anything, but usually contain things that are not too complicated to be understood by the common reader. Some strong haiku precisely describe daily life is written in such a way so as to give the reader an experience and a new perspective / other than the usual situation. Haiku also require "Kigo" or "word (pointer) season", for example, the word "snow" (winter), "flowers" (spring), as a marker of time / season when haiku was written. Of course the words of markers this season is not necessarily should be clear.
1 person likes this
• Greece
18 Nov 12
Thank you a lot for the clarifying answer. It is a fact that more and more people are interested in the japanese culture lately. I think the main reason is the coolness and generally awesomeness of mangas and animes. Most people are hooked to a few japanese series and then they start getting interested in the greater japanese culture.
@natliegleb (5186)
• India
19 Nov 12
its a good move i would say because we can learn more and also the thinking increases in japan culture too
1 person likes this