Does the universe just want to destroy itself?

Canada
November 30, 2012 2:32am CST
Throughout the universe there is a constant entropy. This constant destruction of what is around it, this shift from matter to energy. On the big scale, there are quasars and pulsars and black holes. Quasars and Pulsars release so much energy, but that's a constant burning up of matter, into energy. It really seems like it's going towards a goal of just getting rid of itself. Then on the medium scale, you have galaxies and stars. Each of those stars have so much mass that they are burning themselves up. Our star will last for around 4 billion years, where it will suddenly burst into a supernova, burning up everything around it, and in a very short time, finish off being just a tiny white dwarf, still burning off whatever is left. Then on the smaller scale, there's us, and planets, and life. Planets generally have a molten core, constantly burning matter into energy, but life is the really interesting one. All life eats up whats around it, uses it for energy, then drops off what's left. If you had an enclosed system of life with no additions, then the animals would eat up everything until they ran out, and die off, fueling the plants through the process, which would end up eating everything until they ran out, and die off. The same goes down to viruses and bacteria, they're doing the same thing as life, eating up what's around them, using it for energy, and excreting the rest. Every bit of that excrement is being used by some other form of life, to burn it into energy even more. This seems to be one gigantic process going on. Everything in the universe is trying to burn up everything around it. Is this because the universe forming in the first place was an accident? Something that isn't supposed to happen, and now it's trying to go back to it's original state? What do you think?
1 person likes this
10 responses
@Badkid (235)
• Philippines
30 Nov 12
Some people believe that God created all of the matters..even Black holes.But some people only believe that the universe created itself.its been formed by the stones on the galaxy. I believe that what we've done with our planet will get back to us.some people dont really care about the result of having no care.
1 person likes this
• Canada
30 Nov 12
If it was God that created everything, which is pushing towards destruction, that doesn't sound like the nicest God... As for what we're doing, though, I'm not sure it's going to lead to any kind of direct destruction. I mean, we burn up the planet way more then any kind of plant or animal could... the only thing that burns it up more, is the planet itself. On that, if destruction is a positive thing, that means that the more we burn up, the better we'll do.. and it does go that way. I mean, lets say that some gigantic, world-wide destruction happens because of how much we burn and how much we use up everything around us... we still have the best chances of living on throughout it... the only thing that could really beat us is things like cockroaches and bacteria... but we burn up way more then either of those do. I think we're going to be ok... until everything is gone... and by then, we'll just move on to the next place we can find to burn things up.
1 person likes this
• Thailand
30 Nov 12
hmm.. so in the future, it is better to be a cockroach or a germ? Such fortunate creatures. I don't like fire, it is hot. just making this very heavy discussion lighter. Cheer up no offense meant even to the cockroaches and germs around me. Such a scary future if that will happen.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Dec 12
The problem of evil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Problem_of_evil) is applicable whenever fate/causality and the presence of God ever come up.
@rog0322 (2834)
• Cagayan De Oro, Philippines
30 Nov 12
Hi, Entropy may not necessarily mean the exhaustion of the universe. It is only one stage in the cyclic process of regeneration and generation of its components. The law of conservation of matter and energy is one such indicator that we don't have a dying universe, rather a system that is in a state of flux, of constant motion from one phase to another, from solid to liquid to gas and back again yet consisting of the same atomic element and materials. Thus, we have a balance in nature that goes on indefinitely in one cycle, entropy and destruction being only one component.
1 person likes this
• Canada
30 Nov 12
But in that cycle, the end result is always less mass and more energy... like the sun. You have hydrogen under such pressure that it bonds together and makes helium, but that process lets off loads of neutrons, converting the mass into energy. With this process happening so much across the universe, there ends up being more energy then mass, and with the extreme expansion of the universe, the left over neutrons have far less of a chance of bonding to make more matter. Of course, with so much mass, we're still at least billions of years away from there being no mass left, but it seems like that's what the universe wants...
• China
30 Nov 12
we dont understand dark matter, do we? but whatever~ the process is irreversible, universe will be dark forever one day but not today~
1 person likes this
• Canada
30 Nov 12
Well, we don't know exactly what dark matter is, but we know it's there, because we can see it working, and it's going in the same direction as the matter that we see. Fortunately for us, this destruction won't be happening, even to our planet, for at least millions of years, probably billions of years. We don't have to worry too much about it.
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@stk40m (1119)
• Koeln, Germany
1 Dec 12
I consider the universe as an experiment. Some say that the experimenter is God. Since I am an atheist I have to look for something else that carries out this experiment: us. To be more precise us and everything else that has a consciousness. Take a look around you: isn't it a miracle how everything just fits for life coming into being? Yeah, there's a huge space that is wasted (or burnt as you put it) but if you consider it just an laboratory or experiment of our consciousness it would make sense. An experiment aims at reaching a certain goal but on the way we are faced with obstacles and errors. TRIAL AND ERROR. That's the way an experiment is carried out. We - the experimenters - may have tried several times before (many big bangs) until we finally discovered an outcome that would sustain life - our universe. As you can see, we live and die and animals eat each other. But in the end you also see that there's evolution, we develop towards the better or at least that's what it's supposed to be like. IMO the universe - in the current form - is a pretty neat result for sustaining life, even if limited. Look how complex mathematics and physics are!
• Canada
1 Dec 12
I'm an atheist too, so it's good to see another one on here commenting on this piece... but I have to say, your direction doesn't sound very atheist... that there is an all-encompassing power through our consciousness that creates and destroys the universe for the sole purpose of sustaining life like us... that sounds more like a spiritual agnostic direction to me... If you look at evolution, it seems like it's development goes more towards what makes the best use of the environment to carry on, and therefore, turn more matter into energy. Humans are just a tiny speck of what has happened through evolution on earth, before it was everything growing bigger and bigger, and the bigger they are, the more energy they use. When the conditions changed, where the huge can no longer work, everything gets smarter, so they can figure out how to turn more matter into energy. If making more intelligent life was the goal, and it has to be done by constant evolution, why not make the conditions harsher? The more difficult it is to live, the more intelligence life has to gain. On earth, life was extremely easy to develop and adapt to for a billion years, which is why life was huge but not very smart, with tiny tiny brains. If even down to the bacteria, the ones who would do better had to make more decisions, and form together more, intelligent life would arise way faster. If the universe was just a lab to make life, then why not make it just for life? Why not make just one big planet that could create and sustain life. Even for life on earth, you wouldn't need anything more then just our sun and our planet to make life, so why make other stars? Why make other galaxies? In my atheist point of view, it really seems like life, let alone intelligent life, is just a microscopic speck on this massive amount of everything that's around us, and therefore, us being a principal outcome of the universe just doesn't make sense. It more has to be something that is massive, and happening everywhere... and something that seems to be the far most common, is matter turning into energy.
@stk40m (1119)
• Koeln, Germany
2 Dec 12
I see you're an interesting discussion partner. I'm always interested in such discussions (when there's time :-)). to be honest, I wasn't familiar with the expression ''agnostic''. Well, I took a look at the Wiki and I think I'm not really agnostic since I'm pretty much convinced there's no single entity called God (like the biblical God or the God of the muslims). But you're right that I consider something more all-encompassing as the driving force behind the physical universe. I usually call it ''genereal consciousness'', comparable to an ocean of souls (not just one soul/ spirit called a God) from which latter enter the physical world (I think I already talked to you about that in another discussion, so I won't go too much into detail here) and that ocean - before there was a universe - used all its ''imagination'' to create the big bang with all its physical laws that came into being right after it. But if you create something that big there are many variables (really many) which run like in a program and you don't really know the outcome (therefore - experiment). Yeah, why is it so big and the tiny space that allows life so small ? Good question here. But I think my ''theory'' also has an answer for that. Let's make a parable like good ol' Jesus used to do. Say you want to build a car (on your own). Now, the car itself is relatively small: perhaps a ton in weight, that's it. But to build it you need to make plans first. Then you need to get raw materials. Then you need tools and machines to assemble that car. Now how much time, how much paper, how much raw materials, how many tools did you need to just build that car? And how many places (mines) did you have to dig in to find the metals and other compounds you needed. And that is just some of the stuff you have to consider when you have to start from scratch. And there will be a LOT of waste and ''waste of time''. Now imagine something as complex as life. What do you need for that, i.e. what do you need to create our genome? You will sooner or later come to the conclusion that you will need an awful amount of time, raw material, physical, chemical, biological laws, space, time, energy (yeah, quite a lot of that), gravity etc etc etc. You'll probably end up with a whole universe if you don't want to ''think'' until eternity to make life as ''compressed'' or reduced to the absolute minimum as possible. Thus, if I was the creator of the universe, I probably also would have set the main parameters necessary for creating (hopefully) some sort of life and then I'd have put as much building material and space into that universe so that there are enough options available that somewhere, somehow, and some day life will develop. Of course not really knowing if it will actually work... you see, I really try to explain things here :-) and so we are not perfect and so this universe is so vaste and so there's so much things going on out there that we don't really understand or that we can't even reach. As you know first there was energy, then there was matter (condensed energy or E=mc²). Matter formed from energy. And one fundamental physical law states: no energy is created and no energy is lost. Just transformed. I believe the mere fact that we exist is proof enough that the universe is indeed eternal. If it wasn't then what was before and what will be afterwards? Unfortunately there's a little problem here. ''Time'' does only exist because the universe exists as the big bang created what we call space-time. Before that there was neither space nor time, at least not in the sense we would understand it.
@flowerchilde (12520)
• United States
30 Nov 12
This whole discussion is very interesting.. The Bible says in the beginning there was no entropy.. I wonder what sort of world, universe and living that is..
• United States
30 Nov 12
..but now that I think about it.. I think entropy IS destruction, as you said.. the burning away of all imperfection.. I read just this morning in Deuteronomy 32, I think it was (in the "song of Moses") how God said He's "a kindling fire".. - He is purity and perfection, and for things to remain perfect, impurity has to be consumed away.. The way I read it, is endowing thinking ability (thus choice) was the opening of a real pandora's box.. But unavoidable unless there's never to be rational creatures of any sort, ever.. As opposed to robots, an ant farm, or sticking with flora and fauna (in its perfect state of course). "The lion will" (once again) "eat straw like the ox and the bear will graze with the cow.." Isaiah 11:7.
• Canada
30 Nov 12
The beginning seems really interesting, because as far as we know, there was no entropy, it was more of an extremely fast creation of everything, formation from energy into matter... but after that happened, it's like a wave, and it's trying to go back to just being energy
@bittu27 (86)
• India
30 Nov 12
Things which have a starting point has also got an ending point but the universe is infinite so it doesnt have any starting or ending point. Everything is inside the universe and it is indestructible. although all the matter and objects will get destroyed at a certain point of time, which only GOD knows but i am very much sure that life will get destroyed far before our earth gets destroyed. It takes millions of years to create but a couple of minutes are enough for the universal destruction
• Canada
30 Nov 12
Well, it can't be created or destroyed, but it can change from matter into energy... and if it goes so far that all the matter left over is so slim that it can't reattach to make bigger matter, then we'll mostly have just energy... it really seems like the universe doesn't like matter, and it's trying to change everything around, and we're doing the same.
@Nxwtypx (58)
• United States
1 Dec 12
I don't think the universe wants to destroy itself - I think it's some process chugging along no more aware of itself than a leaf is on the wind or a drop of water in a river.
• India
1 Dec 12
It's impossible to explain the existence of our universe without referring to a creator. Our universe is in existence today because of an intelligent design and not just a mere accident. That means, everything is controlled by our creator GOD and we have nothing to worry.
@sender621 (14956)
• United States
30 Nov 12
I don't think that the universe sets out on a mission to destroy itself. it has help along the way. sometimes what we do is a part of that.
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
30 Nov 12
I have moments where I feel connected enough with everything to feel as if I know what it's all about, but I just can't muster up the hubris to pretend to know what's going on with the universe. I just suppose that the universe is going to do what it does and doesn't "want" anything. It just is. It's a process. Boom, expansion, contraction, poof, repeat.