Creating New Writing Opportunities

United States
February 12, 2013 2:35pm CST
A friend of mine who is an artist also writes a column about the area art scene for a local magazine. It's something they didn't have in their pages before, my friend saw the need and now she has a new writing opportunity. When I was in college, I applied to the campus newspaper. Prior to that I had barely any publication experience. But I applied anyway, was accepted, and got to write an article on a band competition that was well received. One of my courses at university was Creative Writing. In that course, our instructor taught us how to use the Writer's Market annual reference book. Thanks to that knowledge, I had success in getting my poetry published, including the now-defunct Odessa Review alongside the work of Judson Jerome, a recognized poet and editor of a major writer's magazine. I was once a member of a public speaking club called Toastmasters Interntional. It helped me a lot in learning to write speeches. Eventually, I began writing the club's weekly meeting notes for the local newspaper. That taught me public relations and another dimension of journalism. Now that I'm on my third book, just last night I discovered some writers' circles on Google+. There are many links shared there to help create new writing opportunities, and I can hardly wait to try them. Creating new writing opportunities is not only fun, it can also be scary when you're trying new types of writing and new ways and places to sell your work. But it's all very rewarding.
3 responses
@peavey (16788)
• United States
12 Feb 13
Yes, it's rewarding, but it can also be mentally exhausting! When I wrote for a living, it was sometimes all I could do to drag myself to the computer. There are plenty of online opportunities besides just content mill types of sites. Every site online needs content and some more than others. Almost every magazine has an online presence, and many of them take email submissions. The possibilities seem endless.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Feb 13
Heya peavey! The wear and tear of the writing business can indeed be a strain, most often on the best writers. I remember when electronic submissions were just beginning and much frowned upon by most publishers. Malware and virus remedies were not yet up to snuff and editors were wary of avalanches of submissions. Today, the industry is alive with requests for electronic submissions to most writing opportunities, as editorial staff can sift through and reply to submissions on their smartphones, tablets and laptops from anywhere on the face of the earth with good reception. And those smartphones, tablets and laptops host still more writing opportunities for us to create for ourselves.
@peavey (16788)
• United States
13 Feb 13
Yes, I remember when, if you had the ignorance to email a piece, it would be ignored. Now they ask for them. How things change. There was a time when online writers weren't considered real writers, too. We were just underlings who couldn't get published in the "real world!" Times do change...
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Feb 13
I'm so glad we and our opportunities have changed with the times. Being able to knock out writing on my laptop, research markets, submit to multiple publications then track my submissions to these writing opportunities along with their replies, and network with other writers to create still more writing opportunities, all in a matter of minutes, is still a wonder to me.
@wolfie34 (26793)
• United Kingdom
14 Feb 13
The wealth of opportunities are there for the taking if you find the right places my friend, and with your obvious talent. I did a creative writing course but it wasn't what I expected, it wasn't serious and it was silly word games. It's been ages since I have done any serious writing, I used to write books for my own personal use, mind you the internet came along and took up all my time, still at least I can continue my writing skills here on Mylot. I am not sure if I am good enough to get anything published or see it as a career. I admire you and what you can produce, you only have to read your discussions to know that you have the writing 'gift'
• United States
14 Feb 13
Thank you very much, wolfie, for your generous contributions and compliments here on mylot. Talent is nice, but it must be developed, including a talent for creating writing opportunities. Between my uni courses in Creative Writing, Toastmasters and learning on my own in the stacks at the library, on the internet, friends, mentors, intuition and plenty of trial and error on my own part, it gets easier and easier to create writing opportunities. Talent, training and experience each play an important part in creating writing opportunities.
@sirnose (2440)
• United States
12 Feb 13
Hi belindayhughes, I’m always looking for writing opportunities to enhance my earnings. I don’t fear trying new writing genres because I first read up about what style a writer should write in. This is where most beginner writers fail, not knowing what each writing genre require from a writer. From your post you sound as if your‘re a publish writer. What are the names of your books that you have written? I’m not a publish writer as of yet, but I have learnt that you must know what type of writing that you would like to work with and what it takes to be successful in that particular writing genre. I have discover lots of writing opportunities but my computers always crashes before I can establish any kind of writing plan that will help me earn a substantial amount from my writing efforts.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Feb 13
Hello, Sir Nose, nice to meet you. Yes, I am a published writer, both self-published and traditionally published. And you are exactly right. No matter the genre, each writer should know the guidelines for that genre. This comes from reading other writers' works in that genre and practicing oneself. After mastering the rules, of course, the best writers break them shamelessly and often. Nowadays, of course, many writers and publishers are blending genres, creating new and exciting subgenres and more writing opportunities. So the rules are constantly changing. In the end, the writers do what they will, and if the audience likes it, they buy it. It's just that simple.