What should I major in, in college?!

@maezee (29035)
United States
March 31, 2013 9:13am CST
I have three more general classes to take in college and then I will have to transfer to a 4 year and get a 4 year bachelor degree. But in order to transfer I have to know what my major is going to be..... I am at a loss. I am not good at math or science, so strike those. I want the major to be able to open up government-job opportunities to me. I find all of these to be interesting: political science, social justice, criminology, psychology, criminal justice, philosophy... Out of those, which do you think would be most linked to a job in the future? So many people just get degrees haphazardly and don't get jobs with those high-paid degrees after the fact. I do not want to be part of this statistic. What's your opinion? And what did you major in?
5 responses
• United States
1 Apr 13
Look at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook (http://www.bls.gov/ooh/). That will give you a better understanding of what direction certain occupations are expected to head in over the coming years. When you say that you wish to work in a government job, that is rather vague. There are many different types of jobs that fall under that description. Knowing what to focus on can be gleaned from looking at what individual agencies say on their websites. For instance, if you wanted to work for the CIA, a knowledge of Arabic would be useful. Also, where you are getting your degree from can be just as important or even more so than what you major in.
@danix1982 (593)
• Philippines
1 Apr 13
i graduated information technology major in programming, among the courses i think the best one is political science and philosophy it can have you a job in government. philosophy is the course that was taken by my boss when he was in college and good to him he passed the government license exam. hope you choose the right course that is what you like and really love. good luck!
@echomonster (2229)
• Greenwood, Mississippi
31 Mar 13
Of the degrees you mentioned, I think criminal justice would be the most likely to lead to a job directly with a 4-year degree. By "social justice" do you mean social work? I wonder, though, why you're so set on a government job. If I were you, I'd be thinking more along the lines of what my interests are and what degrees are most in demand. Few people get to choose exactly how their careers play out so it's wise to be flexible when you're starting out. Picking your employer before you've gotten your degree limits you too much.
• Philippines
31 Mar 13
i am a graduate of Bachelor of Arts in English and I major in Literature and Language. my bachelor's degree is somewhat useful if you want to be a teacher/professor, a call center agent, a writer etc. Among the choices that you have given, i think the best major/course is criminology although you can still be a policeman/policewoman even you're a graduate of other 4-year courses you just have to undergone some exams and other procedures. But philosophy is the best major in my opinion, because it is really interesting; you will need it if you want to be a professor or a writer. But you know, it is not your course or bachelor's degree that matters when you get into the real world and apply for a job, but your determination, willingness, skills and intelligence..and oh, i want to add the people that you know--that's the best and surest way to get your dream job! Good luck to you!
• Philippines
31 Mar 13
I am a graduate of Political Science but sad to say I was not able to practice what I learned from school in my almost ten years of working. I took up that course in the hope of continuing my studies to law but I found out that there is not that many job opportunities for Political Science graduate like me. So two years ago, I took up Masters in Business Administration in order for me to have more background with business since my current job is running and operating a business. I think, if you plan to enter the government and hope to attain a high paying income, take up a pre-law course but guarantee that you'll be able to continue law. Law is a high paying job.