what's the difference between'Did you finish your work?'&'Have you finsihed your

@Brook909 (111)
April 2, 2013 3:55am CST
hello,all dear mylotters,I have been still bothering by two sentences,because i don't konw the exact meaning of them.what's the difference between'Did you finish your work?'and'Have you finished your work?',many thanks
4 responses
@Zer0Stats (1316)
• India
2 Apr 13
Both have roughly the same meaning but the first is more common in American English,and the second one in British English.
@Brook909 (111)
2 Apr 13
thank you!zerostats,by the way i'd like to ask you another question:if i want to know the time.i can ask'what time is it?'and i learned a sentence of 'do you happen to have the time?'is it equal to 'do you have the time?'?,if so what is the 'happen to 'used for?,many thanks
@owlwings (39064)
• Cambridge, England
2 Apr 13
1) "What time is it?" or "What's the time?" (used when you are fairly certain that the person will know the time). 2) "Do you happen to have the time?" (used when you don't know whether the person has a watch or not) 3) "Do you have the time?" is EITHER a slightly more polite version of (1) OR used when you are asking someone if they can spare the time to help you with something or do something for you. The verb 'to happen to [have/know something]' is used when the possession or knowledge of something is coincidental, extra or slightly unexpected to the situation. N: "How an I going to cut this rope?" M: "I happen to have a pocket knife on me. You can use that!" N: "What is the capital of Iceland?" M: "I happen to know that because I heard it on the News the other day."
@Zer0Stats (1316)
• India
2 Apr 13
It means to have by chance or coincidence.If I pop a button off my shirt and you happen to have a safety pin,it means you did not have a safety pin because you expected me to pop a button,but it's a coincidence that I popped a button at the same time you had a safety pin. It is wordy and in good writing style,it should be avoided. In everyday use it can make a request to either loan or borrow something sound less pushy. "Do you have a pen I can borrow" is somewhat more abrupt than asking,"Do you happen to have a pen I can borrow." "Oh you popped a button! I have a safety pin you can use" is a tad more pushy than saying "I happen to have a safety pin you can use." It carries the idea that I have it but don't have it for any purpose and so it is no imposition if you use it.
@owlwings (39064)
• Cambridge, England
2 Apr 13
The difference in meaning between the two sentences is very small. In many cases, they mean exactly the same. However, "Did you finish your work?" is really asking about a point of time in the past when the work had already been finished; "Have you finished your work?" is enquiring about the situation at this present moment. Strictly speaking, "Did you finish ...?" is asking: "Was the work finished [at some time in the past]? (perhaps, by a set deadline)" and "Have you finished ...?" is asking "Is the work finished [at this moment in time]?"
@Brook909 (111)
2 Apr 13
thank you ,owlwings,by the way,when some people were watching a vedio on DVD and one of them left out for something but when he came back, the vedio was to the end.so how can he ask if the vedio is to the end?Is it to the end?it ended?has it ended?is it over?did it finish?has it finished?.......,please give me the correct sentence,many thanks to you
@owlwings (39064)
• Cambridge, England
2 Apr 13
He would say "Has it finished?", "Is it over?" or "Has it ended?". If he wanted to know the ending of the story, he might ask "How did it end/finish?" or "What was the ending?"
@roshigo58 (4871)
• Pune, India
2 Apr 13
Hi, Did you finished your work? is the sentence in past tense and have you finished your work? is the sentence in present perfect tense.
@Brook909 (111)
2 Apr 13
hi,i know the tenses,but i don't know the diference in meaning of the two sentences,are the two sentence same in meaning?thank you
• United States
2 Apr 13
Both mean really close to the same thing. I can use both in real life. I do think other people have mentioned different tenses and it sounds right to me. I can see both ways being said here in America. Only way I could ever think those could be wrong would be if you are writing multiple sentences and keep changing from one tense to the other within the same paragraph.