Prepping

@GreenMoo (11842)
April 30, 2013 5:53pm CST
I've read a couple of books recently on preparing for disasters, or 'prepping'. Do you have a disaster plan in place, somewhere to go in an emergency where you had to leave your home, extra stores or bags packed? Some of the stuff I've read seems totally OTT, but it's given me a few things to think about.
2 people like this
8 responses
@peavey (16856)
• United States
30 Apr 13
I believe in being prepared, but I'm not an out and out prepper. Where I live, we sometimes have blizzards that keep me from going anywhere, so I have extra food and medicines on hand and I think it's wise to have some stored water, just in case. I also have candles and kerosene lamps, mostly because I like them, but they would definitely help in an emergency. I was without power last fall when we had a really heavy snowstorm that brought down power lines. It was good practice! I think it depends on where you live and what you expect. My preparations would be entirely different if I expected social upheaval, for instance. I'd be looking for a place to run to and have "bug out bags" at the ready.
1 person likes this
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
Similar to yourself, we have extra food, fuel etc here all the time, so we'd manage for some time. We also have a garden, own water supply, own electricity supply, compost loos and are used to roughing it to a degree. I think we'd fare better than most without my putting any effort into forward planning.
@peavey (16856)
• United States
1 May 13
We used to be more that way, with a wood burning stove for both heat and cooking and more lighting options. I also garden and know some about wild food so I could keep going for awhile, I think.
@katsmeow1213 (29047)
• United States
30 Apr 13
Nope.. I'd be out of luck in a true emergency! Not even close to prepared!
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
You're in the city, aren't you? It must be much more difficult to prepare there because of the proximity of many more people. Part blessing, part curse!
• United States
1 May 13
Where I live is not what I consider city... though how you'd perceive it I don't know. I live in the suburbs, in a small town. We've got basic convenience stores nearby.. 1 gas station, a post office, hardware store, that sort of stuff.. but none of us consider it a city. But it's not exactly country living either. We're about 15 minutes away from larger cities.. but it's a little slower and easy going here... Still, compared to how you live.. this probably is city living LOL.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
I'm not sure why I thought you were in the city!
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
1 May 13
I had extra water in plastic bottles, but the field mice have gone to the bathroom all over them and eaten thru some. We always have extra food because we live in the country in a snow belt. I was in another town near here and stranded for two weeks. So where I live, everyone tries to have food for two weeks or more. The town I live in now, they were stranded for 4 weeks during the ice storm. They have even more food put away. If things get really bad, we have to flee to where ever. Like another part of the state, maybe into Canada, to another state. Something minor like minor flooding, most people go to the fire station. When I was working, there was a toxic tire fire and everyone in a neighborhood had to get out. The police knocked on the door and entire families had to leave immediately. Didn't happen to my family, but it did happen to one of the people I worked with. I had a "grab and go" kit of clothes, but now I don't fit in any of those clothes. It's hard to keep up with such a kit because you need different clothes for different seasons. You also need something that moths and mice can't get into. Light weight and easy to carry, too. Good that you're thinking about it.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
Just thinking really, but it's made me realise that the way we live day to day does give us a head start. I already have a pretty impressive food stash (I hate food shopping and preserve a lot, plus we have a garden), we aren't reliant on utility companies and we're already used to 'roughing it' to a degree. I've had a grab and go kit in the car during fire season when there have been fires close by, but I don't generally.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
1 May 13
Im impressed. I wish we weren't dependent on any utitlity. During the ice storm of 1998, here, a friend of mine didn't know there was a problem, he was off grid so that hundreds had no power was news to him until I called. He just put on ice skates and tended to his animal.s
@BarBaraPrz (20542)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
30 Apr 13
Yes, I bought some extra Lean Cuisine today...
@GreenMoo (11842)
30 Apr 13
In a post apocalyptic world, that's the last thing you'll need.
1 person likes this
@BarBaraPrz (20542)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
30 Apr 13
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
1 May 13
I was trained to be a "prepper" as they are now called since I was little, in many ways. We always had extra food and water set aside "just in case" and I was taught to hunt, fish, and track a little. I always have a bag ready with everything I'll need to live on for a week or so, ready to go near the back door. But I'm pretty sure that any emergency will preclude running for the hills, so to speak, so I always make sure I can dig in at home. I usually have weeks' worth of bottled water on hand as well as food and medication for my dogs and myself that will last a month. I rotate supplies regularly. Most people forget about the little things like toilet paper, kleenex, and personal items; I have--or had--plenty of motel samples to use or trade and lots of TP and Kleenex. Since I'm hopefully going to sell my house and move soon I've used up most of my supplies over the past months but will stock up again when I settle down once more.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
I've not consciously been prepping, but thinking about it has made me realise too how much I already do.
@Fishmomma (11467)
• United States
1 May 13
I live in an area with many earthquakes, so people should be prepared. We always have bottled water on hand, as never know if we will need to use it. Also important to select a place to go in case of emergency. This way your family members know where you will be and won't be worried when they can't find you in a reasonable amount of time.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
I've been astonished at how much water is recommended per person for a disaster. It's an awful lot.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
1 May 13
In a word 'no'. How do they define disaster? I cannot control man made disasters, war etc. natural ones are less likely. I live on a hill and we'd have to have Noahesque flooding before I'd worry too much. We even have a shop up here. I could be hit by lightning or high winds of cours. Overall the risk is low so I cannot get too worked up about it all.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
You can't control them, but you could be prepared for them. I'm not knocking it though, I haven't got special plans in place either although I think our day to day situation already has us in a better state of preparedness than many.
@eagletrek2 (5271)
• Kingston, New York
30 Apr 13
here one probelm with disasters.people who are low income rally can not afford to buy thing they need .say like huricane or blizzard, some shelters are to far a way for people who do not drive.all public transport are stop at the time of disasteers i see it in florida and ny .one of the clubs i was in we were giveing can of food to out ,but we made sure each can had a manul can opener.so people can open the can ok have good day.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 13
Much of the prepping type advice need not cost too much, but some people go bananas. i think even having a few bits and pieces close to hand in an emergency would be better than nothing.