The Angst of a Scholarly Saint-The Grave of a Tome

Aurangabad, India
September 17, 2015 12:41pm CST
When you visit the shrine of a well known saint, and are informed by the attendant, that the grave next to that of the saint, is not a resting place of any human; then you are surely in for a surprise, and I got one such surprise of my life today. On a routine weekly holiday jaunt, I chanced upon a visit to this shrine, and came across the full details of this scholarly thirteenth century saint: One Hasan Amir Ala Sanjari, a fast friend of the famous Indian Sufi Saint Hazrat Nizamuddin, of Delhi. This person migrated from North India, down south to Deccan, at the behest of his friend and mentor, and breathed his last here. Legend has it that he was so fed up, with the callous indifference of his time; towards learning, that he had willed that his entire collection of books and manuscripts be buried next to him, upon his demise. His will was adhered to, it seems, and his entire collection of rare books and manuscripts were buried next to him, and there they lie,in a grave next to his. That may be one grave of the tome! I for one, mistook that grave to be that of his spouse, but the attendant there, revealed all this to me, which surely left me surprised. It surely is impossible to guess the mind and angst of a scholar.
3 people like this
3 responses
@jaboUK (53411)
• United Kingdom
17 Sep 15
When I read your title I thought you must have misspelled 'tomb' - Lol. It's a wonder that those books haven't been dug up
1 person likes this
• Aurangabad, India
18 Sep 15
A tome- the word denotes a book, those 'tomes', would have decayed in a short while after the burial. I wonder if their remnants might even exist, as of today.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (53411)
• United Kingdom
18 Sep 15
@gregario888 Yes, I know what a tome is. I wondered if they'd put them in a sealed box or something, but even if they did I expect they would have still decayed.
1 person likes this
• Aurangabad, India
18 Sep 15
@jaboUK Yes Jabo! that person, a scholar par excellence of his time-seems like a disillusioned man- for the fact that he willed his books be buried next to him, and his will was carried in deed, by his followers. His literary treatises-are masterpieces in Urdu and Persian literature. Wonder what made him so sad!
@bluesa (13430)
• Johannesburg, South Africa
18 Sep 15
To have his rare books and manuscripts buried next to him, leads me to believe he was indeed an interesting individual of those times.
1 person likes this
• Aurangabad, India
18 Sep 15
He surely was, indeed he was nothing less than a Sufi saint in his own right, but looks like he loved his books more than even himself, since he couldn't stand any indifference towards them.
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@GreatMartin (4306)
• Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
18 Sep 15
Not only a scholar--after 80 years I find it impossible to guess anyone's mind!
1 person likes this
• Aurangabad, India
18 Sep 15
Yes, for sure! Life surely is a hard grind, and that Sufi, is also known to have lived till his eighties!