Does Your Hometown's Historical Past Fascinate you?

Aurangabad, India
September 21, 2015 4:41am CST
I live in the Aurangabad city of Maharashtra province, in India.This place is dotted with many historical structures, and is a must see on any tourist itinerary. In its vicinity-up to a hundred miles you can come across historical structure which are listed among the world heritage sites, like the rock carvings at Ellora, or the murals within the Ajanta caves, which never fail to fascinate many a domestic,or international tourist. It is hence natural for me to play a guide to any near and dear ones and friends who visit me. Besides, since I have grown up as a kid in Aurangabad, I have a fondness for most of these sites, which I find interesting to share with new friends and acquaintances, as I have right now at Mylot. Do you live in a place which draws heavily from antiquity?In case you do, please feel free to share your feelings with me.
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2 responses
@SIMPLYD (79762)
• Philippines
21 Sep 15
Our hometown has an antique church , but was already renovated inside and kinda modern already . But outside is still a baroque one since you can see that it's made of big boulders .
2 people like this
• Aurangabad, India
21 Sep 15
It surely must be a lovely sight.
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@SIMPLYD (79762)
• Philippines
21 Sep 15
@gregario888 Indeed . I will try to find a picture so i can attach it here .
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• Aurangabad, India
21 Sep 15
@SIMPLYD It'll be lovely...churches do have their own traditions-one in my town, still does a Sunday mass in Urdu language.
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@topffer (34185)
• France
21 Sep 15
My town is old (some buildings found in archeological excavations were from the 5th C BC) and has a few old monuments (ramparts, churches, etc.) but is not very touristic. I like to visit interesting places. We had "Heritage Days" this week-end and many buildings never opened to the public are opened during these days. I visited 2 buildings, and an excavation site. One of the buildings was modern, from the 1930's but has an interesting architecture from its time (we call it "Art Deco" here) ; the guide was very good, and this building had never been opened to the public by its owner before, and will perhaps never be opened again : it was THE occasion to visit it, even if it was not a very old building.
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@topffer (34185)
• France
21 Sep 15
@gregario888 I know the problem. In a town where I worked in the past, there was a freely accessible antique amphitheater. You had people walking the dog there and kids playing on the ruins. The town decided to put a small $2 fee on the entrance. The recipe was not enough to pay the guardian selling the tickets, but the yearly restoration amount needed, lowered at half its previous amount after 2 years and it was a saving of $25000 : when people are paying to visit something, they are more respectful of the monument than when it is freely accessible.
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• Aurangabad, India
21 Sep 15
@topffer That's for sure! Restoring and preserving such artifacts, involves big budgets, and effort. Even these efforts do require quite big outlays, like putting up a battery operated cab to ferry tourists, since the normal ones are sure to pollute the place to its doom, as it is happening in Agra, and even in Ajanta, here at Aurangabad. You cannot allow any big project to come up near such sites, since the vibrations, are sure to deplete that structure forever.
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@topffer (34185)
• France
21 Sep 15
@gregario888 I follow you on this point. Restoration costs a lot but has to be done for the future generations. Anyways it is always better to keep the original/natural environment around if it exists than to have a modern building near a historical monument. A city will always find a lot of space available for big projects when they create jobs.