Clockwork Autumn

@Raelove (16819)
Saco, Maine
October 19, 2015 5:55am CST
Like lots of people, I find the whole Daylight Savings Time thing quite outdated at this point. Here in my part of the world (New England-US), we "spring ahead" an hour in March and "fall behind" an hour in November. This system was instituted many years ago to benefit farmers who could use the extra hour of daylight at the end of the day in the summer and in the morning in the winter. Since traditional farming has declined tremendously since then, lots of folks think it's no longer needed. But we're still stuck with it, and it does wreak havoc with one's internal clock. Right now, I am getting up between 6-6:30 a.m., and it's still very dark out. This happens gradually in the fall, as the earth is shifting its position slowly away from the sun. The same occurs at the end of the day, as the sun is now setting around 6 p.m. Once we set the clocks back an hour in two weeks, it will be bright at 6 a.m. and dark at 5 p.m. While I don't mind the light change at the end of the day, I always have a hard time getting used to waking up when I normally did all summer only to find that it's 5 a.m. and not 6. It completely throws me off, as does "springing ahead" in March. The dates for DST have changed over the years to account for the lunar cycles. When I was a kid, we "sprang ahead" in April, and we "fell behind" in October. So the DST year is getting longer. I really wish they'd do away with it, as nature just naturally adjusts the day, and really doesn't need our help anymore!
11 people like this
10 responses
@Rollo1 (16649)
• Boston, Massachusetts
19 Oct 15
Spring Forward, Fall Back... either way, someone could get hurt. Keeping DST until November means that kids start walking to school and standing at bus stops in the dark for several weeks. It's not sensible at all.
3 people like this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
Here in Maine, it's still dark right now at 6, when many kids are already up and waiting for buses. Once we set the clocks back an hour, it's lighter at 6, which is safer. But then, kids who stay later at school for activities get to walk home in the dark. Either way, it's a quandary.
1 person likes this
@Rollo1 (16649)
• Boston, Massachusetts
19 Oct 15
@Raelove Yes, you're right. It's in the spring when we change to DST that they go back to being in the dark. But we don't have any buses much before 6:55 so unless they walk they aren't out there too early . Still, it's dark now, and then again as we near the solstice and then again when we change to DST. I don't know why they start so early.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
@Rollo1 It's just a big pain in the neck. Here, our high school kids have to be out waiting for the bus at 6:30-7, depending upon how far away they live. Granted, they're older. But I don't recall EVER walking to school in the dark in the "good old days." With these huge school systems we have now, lots of kids spend an hour or more on the bus. That's messed-up, too.
1 person likes this
@simone10 (21664)
• Louisville, Kentucky
19 Oct 15
I am with you on this. With technology the way it is today, those 2 extra hours of daylight aren't necessarily needed anymore. I wish they would just leave it alone.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
I agree, Simone. Makes you wonder why only some parts of the country do it. The state of Arizona doesn't do it, and from what I just read, there is no law that says that anyone has to do it. I found a link with some good info here. And guess what? The whole farmer thing is a myth. They're actually DST's biggest opponents! Who knew?
Our annual clock fiddling leads to fewer robberies and more unhappy farmers, for starters.
2 people like this
@simone10 (21664)
• Louisville, Kentucky
24 Oct 15
@Raelove I sure didn't know that. I always heard it was because of the farmers. Live and learn.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
24 Oct 15
@simone10 I did, too, for years. It just occurred to me the other day that we are changing the clocks next week, which means I'll have less daylight to move into my new place.
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (29646)
• Canada
19 Oct 15
No I do not like the time changes either. I did like the decision made a number of years ago to change the dates to do that on. The reasoning behind that was in an attempt to save energy, which it did because we use less power during the daylight hours.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
Yes. But the way I see it, I don't save a lot of energy if I spend 6 months of the year having to turn the lights on at 5 a.m. when I get up and at 4 p.m. when I'm having my supper. And winters here in the NE do last that long. We only "save" during the summer, which is much shorter. But then we make up the difference with our a/c's running all the time. Not sure that isn't just hype to sell the DST idea.
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (29646)
• Canada
19 Oct 15
@Raelove I agree that the winter seems to be too long in our area also. The DST starts back up again on March 1st so we are only on the other fall back time for 4 months, much nicer then the former 6 months before they changed it up. It still is not a very appealing time of the year.
1 person likes this
@amadeo (64023)
• United States
19 Oct 15
we change our in Nov.I wish that they leave things alone.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
Me, too, Alfredo. Pain in the neck.
• United States
19 Oct 15
It is helpful for young parents as their children are not necessarily going to the bus in the dark. I agree that it is not as important today, but for those days when I was a parent it was nice to have my children walking with the natural light available.
2 people like this
• Preston, England
19 Oct 15
It's a nuisance sorting out every clock in the house including cooker clocks twice a year
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
Yes, it is, Arthur. Fortunately for me, I have very few clocks now. My computer and phone clocks automatically adjust.
1 person likes this
• Preston, England
19 Oct 15
@Raelove my computer self-changes but not any other time-pieces I depend on
2 people like this
@blitzfrick (2912)
• United States
19 Oct 15
I'm against DST myself, it gives my circadian rhythm whiplash, then I get grumpy. Hmph.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
I just "lose my place," Carol! I already have enough senior moments without them changing the time on me!
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Oct 15
I also wish they would do away with the spring ahead and fall back. I hate it when it gets so dark in the early evening
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16819)
• Saco, Maine
19 Oct 15
@Marilynda1225 I don't mind that as much as the reverse in the spring, as it comes so early now. First week of March, and there is still often snow on the ground, so it feels VERY weird to me. I just hate the whole process.
@LadyDuck (152444)
• Switzerland
19 Oct 15
Same here, we are going to come back to Solar time the next Sunday October 26th, not early enough, the mornings are very dark now.
1 person likes this
• United States
20 Oct 15
We do the same here north east USA, and when it started around the later 70's here I was not excited about getting up in the dark only to wait after sunrise, missing it for a late school bus, always late ! It gets my Circadian Rhythm off so much after 7 months, I just want to hibernate and guess what soon Winter will be here and I can, well a little bit I am human not bear last time I checked have a great day