Turkey Tasting Turned Tart . . .

United States
November 29, 2015 12:49am CST
I am a connoisseur for the poultry known as turkey here in the USA since it is the most 'beneficial' of proteins to get within the constructs of my diet that my blood type dictates. In the commercial processing arena where poultry is both raised, slaughtered and then distributed, it is how much 'processing ' someone like me can tolerate which has me researching a lot of what I eat from many different observations as well as personal 'taste tests'. I had the opportunity to cater a Thanksgiving feast offering two very succulent birds unstuffed but continually basted roasting in a temperature of 275 degrees for 8 hours or so. By the time I got there, the poppy thingies were out, birds were cooked to grocery standard satisfaction. I clearly had not studied the packing label in which the 2% solution ingredients would of been found, warning me not to indulge in eating this particular very salty but tasty and tender, a melt in your mouth experience. Most fowl eaters, that is persons who like water fowl like grouse, guinea hens, capons or the 'wild turkeys', know good taste and fresh un-salted meat of a bird that has not been injected with some terrible new salt called 'sodium isinonate'. It was in this bird I had a slice of where I catered and how I know this without even reading the label, well . . . I came home and of course ran the course of a splitting headache (22 hours) induced by the disodium isinonate which has caused this before, previous two years ago a turkey breast we purchased was processed, although minimally, with also a 2% salt solution containing broth and disodium isinonate. That time it was a Tyson bird. Mom and I searched two days for a Turkey that was fresh and NOT containing any 2% salty solution to enhance flavor as we already know a good turkey is a dry one, but not so that it is inedible; but not so moist and even too succulent to realize something is amiss. We found one at a local butcher specializing in non-commercially processed with junk, foods. Our Turkey prepared Friday was slightly moist, delicious, not salty and not tainted with any junk all the regular Turkeys bought and eaten during the Holiday that contained the 2% salt and broth solution using a disodium isinonate base ! So what did your Turkey have in it ?
6 people like this
6 responses
@Drosophila (16711)
• Ireland
29 Nov 15
I feel that I've lived a sheltered life! I have not had the pleasure of trying these things: grouse, guinea hens, capons or the 'wild turkeys'
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Nov 15
Hee hee @Drosophila well sheltered only because the local grocery stores might not have carried these wild fowl, I am only lucky enough to have found a store that does carry these sort of things and can explore some things on my diet list. If you get a chance to get into a grocery store that has capons, and quite a few do, they are delicious prepared the same way as a Cornish game hen or roasted domestic chicken . . .
1 person likes this
@Drosophila (16711)
• Ireland
30 Nov 15
@enlightenedpsych2 Unfortunately, some of these simply can't be found in Ireland. I will try with my local butcher and see if there's any luck.
• United States
30 Nov 15
Aw I am sorry to hear that Ireland cannot have these fowl imported to you, even from the forests still remaining in the United Kingdom ? @Drosophila
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157720)
• Switzerland
29 Nov 15
I only buy fresh poultry products, I do not usually buy turkey because it's too big, but I always check the label to be sure of what I buy. I am not even sure that this process is allowed here.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Nov 15
@LadyDuck it is a chemical that is part of a salty solution 2% of that disodium isinonate added to water which most likely is NOT practiced in the poultry processing plants in your country because more care for safer and healthier food is recognized elsewhere but here, unfortunately. I am STILL thankful for smaller butchers who can and will buy in demanded bulk, only the freshest meats, poultry and seafood for us persnickety customers !
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157720)
• Switzerland
30 Nov 15
@enlightenedpsych2 I have noticed that you have more added chemicals to the food, it's a shame, the governments should take more care of the health of their citizens.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Nov 15
I agree completely but as a citizen of the USA I can only complain and educate and hope individuals decide for themselves, thanks for commenting @LadyDuck
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (38370)
• United States
30 Nov 15
I haven't a clue but it was delicious and I didn't have a headache.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Nov 15
Well if no headache then most likely nothing was injected into the poultry at the food processing plant
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (38370)
• United States
30 Nov 15
@enlightenedpsych2 My son cooked the bird I am not sure if it was fresh or frozen.
@Tampa_girl7 (25722)
• United States
16 Mar 16
My husband always gets a turkey from his employer every year.
1 person likes this
• United States
16 Mar 16
Great but of it has a 2% solution injected into it, the meat is therefore chemically altered and who needs something called disodium isinonate in their body anyway. Do you know what is in that turkey your hubby gets every year from his boss ? thanks marie for visiting
@celticeagle (118280)
• Boise, Idaho
29 Nov 15
I am very sensitive to sodium. I don't like it. Would rather use herbs to enhance flavor of most anything I eat. And pepper and garlic are two of my favorite spices. But, alas, too much of anything is not good.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Nov 15
Oh absolutely true @celticeagle on the moderation inference; as we enjoy our middle age, I myself LOVE to experiment with same cuts of meat or poultry and several combinations of spices turned into glazes, reductions and gravies
@PainsOnSlate (20254)
• Canada
19 Dec 15
My family is not a turkey loving group. We love a leg of lamb, or a really good roast beef. I can't remember the last time we had a turkey. Hubby is Greek so can do a great job with lamb and I'm of English decent and roast beef was our celebratory meal.
1 person likes this