What does the word "bungalow" mean to you?

Eugene, Oregon
December 5, 2015 12:15pm CST
Driving through an older neighborhood in my fair city last week, the word "bungalow" came to mind while looking at rows of older houses on the streets. I see the word used in real estate ads too. Merrill-Webster's dictionary defines the word as : a house on one level or a main level with second smaller level above. They usually have front porches too. The word comes from India (my wife knew this, I did not) and is a thatched or tiled roof single level house with a veranda. What does "bungalow" mean to you ? Are there houses like that in your area? Maybe the definition has become so broad, it covers any house style.
8 people like this
9 responses
@MALUSE (28777)
• Denmark
5 Dec 15
I knew about the origin of the word, too. It's derived from Bengal, the part of India which is now Bengladesh. I've always thought that it is a house with a flat roof
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
5 Dec 15
Oh, I did not think of the flat roof aspect.
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
5 Dec 15
@JamesHxstatic I don't think that's the case. It's the number of floors not the shape of the roof that counts.
@marlina (57106)
• Canada
5 Dec 15
To me, bungalow means a one storey house, that's all.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
5 Dec 15
That is sort of the way I see it too.
@amnabas (9702)
• Karachi, Pakistan
5 Dec 15
To my opinion it is a luxurious house.
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• Eugene, Oregon
5 Dec 15
Some of them certainly can be luxurious,
@just4him (81742)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
7 Dec 15
I was doing research for a book on house styles and bungalow was one that intrigued me with it's style - single level with a nice front porch. There's one in the neighborhood I live in and it's a nice looking home.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (111649)
• Boise, Idaho
6 Dec 15
We have several here. To me they are low built with a full length front porch. Usually do not have an upper level. I am finding an origin to the word as follows: late 17th cent.: from Hindi ba?gla ‘belonging to Bengal.’
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@owlwings (37695)
• Cambridge, England
5 Dec 15
In Britain the word "bungalow" refers to a single storey house, usually detached. If the building has a 'half' upper storey, with dormer windows (but with the roof still coming down to the first storey) it is known as a "chalet bungalow". British bungalows tend not to have a verandah, though some do (the last house I owned had, originally, a rather narrow verandah on the south side at the back which had been glazed so that it was more of a corridor. We demolished it and built a large conservatory/living room in its place.
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@seren3 (393)
• Los Angeles, California
5 Dec 15
I remember when travelling in India the cheap motel-like digs were "government bungalows" built for the many travellers during colonial times. Yet thinking back, I don't remember the flat roofs. (back in the mists of time lol).
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@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
5 Dec 15
In India they can be quite grand but generally the word just means a single storey property.
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@LadyDuck (108967)
• Switzerland
6 Dec 15
A bungalow is a low rise house, usually with only one floor, the shape of the roof does not count.