Breast Feeding in a Restaurant Yea or Nay

@BelleStarr (39591)
United States
December 26, 2015 3:30pm CST
Okay, I know that this is going to be unpopular but I have to say it. Why would you want to feed your baby in an upscale restaurant? I understand wanting to breast feed, I understand wanting to take your child to a restaurant, what I don't understand is lifting your shirt and feeding the baby. Have you never heard of a breast pump? While it may be the most natural thing in the world to you, it isn't to me or my 22 year old grandson. We might not want to share this wonderful experience with you. No attempt to have a diaper or blanket over the shoulder, just very obvious breast feeding. I am sure that I will be getting hate mail but I don't feel that this was appropriate behavior. There are some things that are natural but can be done privately and in my personal opinion this is one of them. Do the best thing for your child, I fully understand that I just don't understand why you want to do this in front of 20 people who you don't know? Okay I am done ranting.
22 people like this
10 responses
@Asylum (48266)
• Manchester, England
26 Dec 15
The are certainly more appropriate places. It would not bother me and I would simply carry on and ignore it, but I do agree that many customers will not be happy. I genuinely believe that some people will intentionally choose such a place in order to draw attention so that they can shout about how natural it is. There is no denying that it is natural, but so is urinating and we would not do that in public.
4 people like this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
26 Dec 15
My opinion exactly. I am not quite sure what the point was but I would rather have not had it forced on me, I guess it is mother's rights against grandmother's right not to view.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (42606)
• Germany
27 Dec 15
You would urinate in public? You may have forgotten a 'not'. :-)
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48266)
• Manchester, England
27 Dec 15
@MALUSE Oh dear, that did make a serious difference to the overall sentence.
1 person likes this
@boiboing (12882)
• Northampton, England
26 Dec 15
I don't want to have small grizzly babies in a nice restaurant but they are probably better than kids whose parents let them run wild.
3 people like this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
26 Dec 15
Admittedly when the baby was nursing it stopped crying lol What a choice!!
@MALUSE (42606)
• Germany
26 Dec 15
I wouldn't want to be forced to be part of such an intimate moment with strangers, either. I think women who behave like this want to prove something.
2 people like this
• Greece
27 Dec 15
What do you think she wants to prove? All mothers can do it without any training, it just comes with the job.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (42606)
• Germany
27 Dec 15
@41CombedaleRoad Please read the comment below by Koalemos. This is what I mean.
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (32339)
• Canada
27 Dec 15
I agree with you. There is a time and a place and there is a way to do it discretely. For the time that you are in having a meal I am sure that the mother could have timed her trip there more appropriately so that she could have enjoyed herself better had she done this before she left home.
2 people like this
@msiduri (5750)
• United States
27 Dec 15
Sometimes babies just don't cooperate with other people's schedules, though. But I agree there are ways to do such things more discretely.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
27 Dec 15
She seemed to be enjoying herself, me , not so much!!
@simone10 (21647)
• Louisville, Kentucky
27 Dec 15
I agree that it is a beautiful and natural thing but she should have covered herself, especially in such an upscale restaurant. Or like you said, pumped before she left. To me, it sounds like she was trying to make some kind of statement.
1 person likes this
@simone10 (21647)
• Louisville, Kentucky
2 Jan 16
@BelleStarr Oh really? I don't think there is anything wrong with making a point or a stand as long as you consider the feelings of others while doing it which she didn't do.
1 person likes this
@simone10 (21647)
• Louisville, Kentucky
6 Jan 16
@BelleStarr Oh my! That is usually all it takes to get things going.
1 person likes this
@softbabe44 (5899)
• Vancouver, Washington
27 Dec 15
Well, I think she should have had a blanket that was long enough to conceal at least the rest of it doesn't really bother me I don't think about it.
1 person likes this
• Vancouver, Washington
29 Dec 15
@BelleStarr Wow she could have covered it up at least.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
29 Dec 15
@softbabe44 Luckily I was facing her not my husband and grandson.
@msiduri (5750)
• United States
27 Dec 15
One can do such a thing in public with class. A blanket thrown over the shoulder would make a lot of difference.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
27 Dec 15
That is it exactly, she did not have a nursing shirt on either just a polo so not the most discrete thing in the world.
1 person likes this
@msiduri (5750)
• United States
27 Dec 15
@BelleStarr On the bright side, the baby probably stopped fussing. But what a visual.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (14317)
• United Kingdom
27 Dec 15
I have no objection to nursing mothers feeding their babies but with a bit of decorum covering the babies head with muslin to maintain some privacy and dignity. But those ignorant women who get their udders out in front of other people are asking for complaints. There have been cases here where they have caused uproar in restaurants for doing this and have gone straight to the paper. If they had used a bit of common sense in the first place they would not have been asked to be a bit more discreet!
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
28 Dec 15
They evidently want to prove something. I was not impressed I will tell you.
@msiduri (5750)
• United States
27 Dec 15
A friend of mine had it down to a science. I swear she could nurse and no one around her but she and the baby knew what was going on. A bunch of us were having lunch... somewhere. One guy got up to go, said good-bye to her, said good-bye to her son and went to touch his cheek or something. She said, "He's having lunch, too." He just about jumped out of his skin.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
27 Dec 15
lol, that is as it should be, a private moment between mother and son.
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (25827)
• United States
26 Dec 15
I don't have a problem with it if done discretely. Not covering yourself is just tacky.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39591)
• United States
26 Dec 15
That's what I thought, a cloth diaper or a receiving blanket would have made all the difference.
1 person likes this