Football vs. Football

@Raelove (13029)
Saco, Maine
December 28, 2015 8:41am CST
It's pretty common knowledge that the word "football" does not carry the same connotation everywhere in the world. In Great Britain, the word describes the sport of soccer, while in the U.S., it describes a very different and much more violent process. The only thing the two have in common is that, in both sports, the feet are involved. But that's where it ends. Kicking an egg-shaped ball halfway across a playing field is vastly different from kicking it in such a way as to make sure it gets to where it's going, which is what soccer is about. While soccer involves lots of skill and dexterity, football involves much violence, and, in far too many cases, serious injuries. Let's face it: all sports create some level of risk. But the severity of the injuries inherent to American football is causing many people to take notice and to be concerned. The bottom line is this: is it worth keeping fans and spectators happy at a cost that too often includes irreversible brain damage? According to some experts, the injuries don't always result in concussions or severe trauma to the head. Just repeatedly jerking the neck back and forth during a season is enough to disrupt the brain's natural function and set the stage for more serious problems down the road. There is also mounting concern for young boys who play, citing that it takes much less blunt force to injure their brains than it does to injure that of a grown and burly man. There is mounting evidence that has put that issue on the table once again. But of course, it's not one that will easily be resolved. I've only ever had a passing interest in the sport myself, and that dates way back to the 1960's when I went to our high school games during which I had no idea what was going on unless it involved a touchdown and everyone was cheering. As for soccer, I'm not much of a spectator anyway, so that sport doesn't interest me any more than do basketball, hockey or baseball. Americans love their sports, and many of the supposedly intelligent among them choose to ignore the fact that football may just be too violent and dangerous. It's a multi-billion-dollar industry right now, but again, at what cost to a player who is incapacitated for life and who wishes he'd never picked up that ball? (Public Domain Image)
3 people like this
7 responses
@marlina (46536)
• Canada
28 Dec 15
I am not a sports fan, therefore can not understand the fascination of all this stuff.
2 people like this
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
I can understand liking to watch it, but you'd have to live in Maine to understand that ridiculous obsession with the Patriots football team. It's a religion.
• United States
28 Dec 15
Any sport can be dangerous..heck, walking to a sporting event can be.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
Yes, but that is more accidental. I've walked a lot in my life and have never had my head bashed to the ground or been shaken repeatedly by a 300-pound linebacker. There's a big difference in my book.
• United States
28 Dec 15
@Raelove I sat one row in front of a woman who got hit square in the face with a fly ball at Yankee Stadium...i'd take the 300 pound linebacker over that.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
@AbbyGreenhill I'm happy with neither.
@amadeo (29436)
• United States
28 Dec 15
Boxing is a sport and a good one
1 person likes this
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
I'm just not into watching people hurting each other deliberately.
@Orson_Kart (3256)
• United Kingdom
28 Dec 15
I believe that almost everywhere else in the world, except the USA, defines football as a game played mainly using the foot. Hence the word football. American football is a derivative of our rugby football, which is using an egg-shaped ball carried mainly in the hand. Both seem to be misnamed. Football (or soccer) is supposed to be a non contact sport, so should result in less injuries. American football and rugby are both contact sports and therefore carry a higher risk of injury. In recent years, in rugby, they have been trying to protect players more, particularly heads, from serious injury. In rugby, no protective head wear is worn, which makes it even more dangerous than the American version.
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
By whatever name it's called, if players must face a high risk of brain damage, what's the point if they have to spend their millions on doctors and surgery, much of which is unsuccessful? Makes no sense to me.
• United States
28 Dec 15
I read somewhere that the cup the player's wear was invented BEFORE the helmet. I Guess we all know what is more valuable! But in all seriousness no recreational activity is worth ones life. I don't watch football (occasionally I watch the super bowl).
1 person likes this
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
I agree. And that is funny about the cup.
@boiboing (11280)
• Northampton, England
28 Dec 15
I still question why boxing is considered a sport.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (13029)
• Saco, Maine
28 Dec 15
Forgot about that one, but you're right. So many people come away from that with inuries. But it is not nearly as widespread popular as football. That's an obsession for so many Americans, it's pathetic.
@Juliaacv (11987)
• Canada
28 Dec 15
There is a risk of head injuries in soccer also, when they hit it off of their heads. But nothing compared to the tackle football game injuries.
1 person likes this