Students Of Today

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@HazySue (21907)
United States
January 23, 2016 8:42am CST
I am finding more and more that many of the students today are disrespectful of the adults, other students, and themselves. Don't get me wrong, I have some wonderful students that I wouldn't trade for the world. I am talking about the ones who don't want or care to learn, think that education is unimportant, and just plain have no respect for themselves. We seem to have a continual problem from disruptive students that are taking teaching and learning time away from the rest of the students that actually want to learn. I understand that we are supposed to be able to control our students but do people understand that taking the time out to do so takes away the time we can be teaching. There is no longer the option of sending them outside the room to less the disturbance. I am concerned for the education of our children. Between testing and discipline we are really not spending as much time teaching as we should be. These children are our future. What do you think? Am I way off the mark?
13 people like this
13 responses
@DanciaKS (191)
23 Jan 16
As someone who will be in the field of Psychology, I can't help but think about the psychology of these students. I think the problem is not disciplinary actions but care itself. You yourself mentioned they have no respect for themselves. This jumps at me. Without care for themselves, how can they care for anything? This problem starts from home and the economy. With a competitive and destructive economy, adults are constantly looking for ways to make money. Some businesses take advantage and force them into working overtime and would lose their job if they did not do the unfair work. This causes at home problems including neglectful and short tempered parents, not to mention anxiety. Neglect makes a child want attention. Of course, they need it. If they can't find positive attention, they fall back into negative attention. By experience, I know when I accomplish something large, I most likely will not get recognition from my parents. At least, they won't show it. However the slightest wrong-doing, I get their attention. Aggression with parents leads to aggression with kids. The kids follow in their parents' footsteps and are more explosive. They may get into more fights, they may argue everything, and they may try to trick you. They themselves become short tempered. Now anxiety is typically genetic, but being in an environment of anxiety can trigger it on children, even if it is not evident and the child is not their biological child. Anxiety can make kids act out in different ways as there are also different types of anxiety. The child may become quiet and unresponsive, they may become distracted, they may be hyper, and they may become aggressive. This being considered, I would say rather than focusing solely on discipline, to ask about home life, social life, and maybe even work life. Try talking to their parents on a more personal basis and if they are having financial issues, bring up the topic of financials and make them aware schools have extra savings for families that cannot afford much. Also remember that even after the personal issues have improved, it will take time for the child to get better. Recovery takes time and even character itself takes time. (think about the character cycle on how acting on virtues increases the likelihood of acting on virtues in the future) Reference: past research for articles, mental health certifications, mental health conferences Possible Bias: I am a 17 year old student
@DanciaKS (191)
24 Jan 16
@TheHorse For sure. I find most teachers don't look beyond discipline so I try to reach out to the troubled.
3 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
24 Jan 16
@DaniciaKS I think that the behavior absolutely begins from home. We routinely try to talk to parents but unfortunately many of them will not get back in touch or are totally unreachable. Of course there are those who think that their child is always right no matter what.
3 people like this
@DanciaKS (191)
24 Jan 16
@HazySue Yes, some parents are just plain snobs which sadly, that probably means their child gets plenty of sass as well.
• United States
23 Jan 16
I won't be around when they are running the world, thank goodness.
3 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@AbbyGreenhill I have begun thinking along the same line as you.
2 people like this
• United States
23 Jan 16
@HazySue It is scary when you think about it,
2 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@AbbyGreenhill it is. We have to stand in the halls between classes and watch the students so they don't start smacking each other around.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (54492)
• United Kingdom
23 Jan 16
You are way ON the mark. As you point out, respect is the main issue. When I was at school we were in awe of our teachers and would no more disrespect them than fly to the moon.
3 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@jaboUK I didn't disrespect teachers and neither did my girls when they were in school. I sent mine to private school and to tell the truth if they were young now I would definitely send them to private school.
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67110)
• Pleasant Hill, California
24 Jan 16
@HazySue I mostly went to a private school in Chicago, and I'm glad I did. The streets were dangerous, but the school was both safe and excellent academically.
2 people like this
@amnabas (10309)
• Karachi, Pakistan
23 Jan 16
Yes that is right we never did anything wrong to our teachers.We were speechless infront of them but nowadays students are loudy and disrespectful with teachers.
3 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@amnabas We used to respect our teachers. We were afraid of the consequences if we did misbehave.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67110)
• Pleasant Hill, California
24 Jan 16
1966: student gets in trouble if student screws up. 2016: teacher gets in trouble if student screws up.
2 people like this
@Marcyaz (35651)
• United States
23 Jan 16
I have heard that some students have no respect for their teachers, I do know that if one of my children even talked back to a teacher they would have suffered the consequences which would probably have meant stay in your room after school and no sports on the weekend.
3 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@Marcyaz you would have most likely heard if your child has been disrespectful. It sounds like you are one of the parents that actually care.
2 people like this
@Marcyaz (35651)
• United States
24 Jan 16
@HazySue I would never allow a child of mine to speak disrespectful to a teacher even once would have been one time too many.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67110)
• Pleasant Hill, California
24 Jan 16
You're right on the mark. Unfortunately, if you discipline students, you might wind up with legal action on your hands, or false accusations (racism, sexism, etc.), so many teachers and administrators are running scared.
2 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
24 Jan 16
@TheHorse there is that problem. We find that administration is so scared of repercussions that they tend to do nothing.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67110)
• Pleasant Hill, California
24 Jan 16
@HazySue I feel this needs to change. I'm glad there are no more rulers slapping fingers. But teachers and administrators should feel safe disciplining students appropriately.
1 person likes this
@paigea (22420)
• Canada
23 Jan 16
It is a lot of work to be a teacher and to deal with so many difficult behaviours. The whole school has to work together; that's what I find as a substitute.
2 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@paigea I agree the problem is people aren't working together unfortunately.
2 people like this
@shshiju (10545)
• Cochin, India
23 Jan 16
It is the difference between old and new generation students.
2 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@shshiju I think you are right. Many times though I understand the behavior after I meet the parents.
1 person likes this
@Morleyhunt (19856)
• Canada
23 Jan 16
Too many times there are no consequences, or the parents go to the other extreme. You can't fail a child (hold them back) everyone makes the team, whether they have talent, ability or just plain grit. What goals can they strive for?
2 people like this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
23 Jan 16
@Morleyhunt there needs to be consequences for their actions. I think that too many kids have no goals. Ask them what they want to do when they are out of school and I have received a blank look as though it is something they have never thought about.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126217)
• Bunbury, Australia
24 Jan 16
I think there should be more/better/different discipline in the home with children being taught respect for those in authority.
2 people like this
@pauliek (288)
• Udon Thani, Thailand
24 Jan 16
I think the students bad classroom behavior stems from a lack of moral values learned first in the home and then reinforced in schools. Can't the worst offenders be punished in any way? Also, aren't there any kind of alternative schools?
1 person likes this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
24 Jan 16
@pauliek there are alternative schools but it is almost impossible to get a child in there. They are overcrowded and the paperwork is outrageous. It many times can take up to a year or more to get a child placed.
1 person likes this
@pauliek (288)
• Udon Thani, Thailand
25 Jan 16
@HazySue Having lived out of the U.S. for so long, I was unaware of this fact.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (14263)
• United Kingdom
24 Jan 16
Respect comes from the parents. However over the years parental rights have been eroded in favour of brattish children. If you could get the parents on board to discipline and support you there could be a change. It is ridiculous that you can not remove disruptive children. I think some teachers are Saintly. I could not do that job for all the tea in China. I admire you!
1 person likes this
@HazySue (21907)
• United States
24 Jan 16
@garymarsh6 I totally agree, respect does and should begin at home. I long for years past when we controlled the kids, not they controlled us.
@alchemistrx (2569)
• Philippines
24 Jan 16
It's a millenial thing as they say. The lost youth.
1 person likes this