You must save money on 4 February

@scheng1 (24742)
Singapore
February 3, 2016 7:30am CST
There is a custom among the Chinese to save money on 4 February of every year. 4 February is the start of spring according to the Chinese Solar calendar. Chinese Solar calendar splits a year into 24 sub-seasons or solar terms. 6 sub-seasons or solar terms make up a season. 4 February is the actual Chinese New Year, since that is the start of spring. The traditional Ten Thousands Year Calendar used for farming, and fortune telling uses Li Chun as the start of a year. When we talk about people born in Zodiac year, we should base on Li Chun, not the Chinese New Year as in Chinese Lunar calendar. That is why farmers start farming on Li Chun, and we should save money on Li Chun. It will bring wealth and good luck for the whole year. On 4 February, you should wear red, and go to the bank to deposit money. Remember to do it yearly on Li Chun, and you will never be short of money every year.
14 people like this
16 responses
@SIMPLYD (82837)
• Philippines
4 Feb 16
Here , the Chinese New Year will be on February 08 , and our president declared it as a special non-working holiday . We join the Chinese people in celebrating it by having the dragon dance at the mall .
3 people like this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
Chinese New Year follows the lunar calendar. Li Chun means the Start of Spring, which follows the solar calendar.
1 person likes this
@SIMPLYD (82837)
• Philippines
5 Feb 16
@scheng1 Oh i see .
@youless (93494)
• Guangzhou, China
4 Feb 16
Since China is a large country, so actually different zones will have different customs. At least in Guangzhou, I don't know the customs you mentioned although today is February 4 Here we have nothing special to do today
2 people like this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
I think it is strange that Li Dong has more meaning than Li Chun. I know that on the day of Li Dong, which is the start of winter, many people have the culture of drinking herbal soup to strengthen the body.
1 person likes this
@youless (93494)
• Guangzhou, China
5 Feb 16
@scheng1 Perhaps in the Northern China, people will pay more attention to Li Dong.
@salonga (27954)
• Philippines
4 Feb 16
The Chinese have lots of superstitious belief. Do you believe and follow all of them?
2 people like this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
I follow the good ones. Don't you think that a tradition that encourages saving is a good tradition? Too many traditions advocate spending!
1 person likes this
@salonga (27954)
• Philippines
4 Feb 16
@scheng1 Good traditions are worth following of course. i love to save and i teach the kiddies to save as well.
@louievill (19633)
• Philippines
3 Feb 16
Have you personally tried this?
2 people like this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
3 Feb 16
Of course
2 people like this
@louievill (19633)
• Philippines
3 Feb 16
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (102457)
• United States
3 Feb 16
I love to wear red. Husband's check goes automatically to the bank at midnight on the fourth, so we should be good.
2 people like this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
That does not count! The tradition is to encourage saving! Do you notice that nearly all festivals and celebrations encourage spending? Is there any that encourages you to save? At least for us, this is a reminder of the importance of saving.
@jaboUK (55052)
• United Kingdom
3 Feb 16
It's always good to save money, whtever the time of year, but it's an interesting tradition.
2 people like this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
I think of all the traditions in the world, this is the one that explicitly encourages saving! If only we have more traditions that drum in the importance of saving money.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
4 Feb 16
wow, that's new to me. Oh, I read your article late, it's now evening in our country, and the bank closes mid-afternoon, so there's now I could save in February 4. Also, the Chinese New Year falls on Monday, February 8...however, as you aid we should follow the Li Chun skeds.
1 person likes this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
The Chinese solar calendar is the one that determines the official start date of season, as well as the Tomb-sweeping day. That is why it is still in use in many parts of the world.
• Philippines
5 Feb 16
@scheng1 Goodluck Goodwealth for 2016 as we celebrate the Chinese New Year season!
@yugocean (8839)
• India
4 Feb 16
But February 4 is not a Chinese calendar date
1 person likes this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
It is. It is based on Chinese solar calendar, also known as Chinese farmer calendar.
1 person likes this
@alchemistrx (2569)
• Philippines
4 Feb 16
I try to save money as I could because i want to live my dream.Your tradition is interesting.
1 person likes this
@scheng1 (24742)
• Singapore
4 Feb 16
A tradition that teaches us to save money is definitely a good tradition. I hope that the young generation can appreciate this tradition.
@allknowing (69325)
• India
4 Feb 16
I do not believe in fixed days for this, that or whatever.
1 person likes this
• Japan
4 Feb 16
Well, I'm not planning on shopping today. Does that count?
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Feb 16
Very interesting to learn about LiChun
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (43415)
• Uzbekistan
3 Feb 16
If I deposit money in the bank wearing, say, green I will be short of money throughout the year? :-)
1 person likes this
@amadeo (72844)
• United States
3 Feb 16
I try at times.I am a big spender
1 person likes this
@amnabas (10315)
• Karachi, Pakistan
3 Feb 16
Ohhh really. It's interesting.
1 person likes this
@marlina (77791)
• Canada
3 Feb 16
First time I hear about this one.
1 person likes this