Is It Needed to Protect Our Intellectual Properties?

@Shavkat (46777)
Philippines
February 4, 2016 10:25pm CST
When I was working in a government agency, I had created my own soft data system. It was really a disaster situation in going through the raw data. The job responsibilities were passed on me when the previous employee was evicted due to incompetent issue. I had my sweat and blood in fixing the available information that was left behind. In fact, there is no proper endorsement of the essential documents to me. I would say that the work in the government is a never ending tasks. Thus I had worked double time to catch up the target milestones of the community’s projects. Luckily, I embraced the challenges and meet the deadline of my reports. It is also a big plus that I had systematize my personal data base. After eight months working under the umbrella of the agency and the projects are successfully completed. I decided to file my resignation due to some factors that I couldn’t stay in that place. I cannot bear the tribal war and safety is my first priority. I had filed the necessary requirements to end my contract in the central office and started to pile up the hard documents for officially endorsing it to the next person who will be hired. I thought it would be smoothly carried out the task. But then, my team that I considered starting to harass me and requesting to surrender my database. I felt disturbing since they don’t have the right to acquire my intellectual properties. For them to stop, I started to put passwords to my database system. It is my protection since I don’t want somebody to intrude my raw data. Besides, the community projects are centralized to the national level and I don’t want to jeopardize my profession just because someone in the team sabotage me. We can never tell the flow of their minds. With this kind of behaviors from them, I felt they are stealing my intelligence and it is not the right way
3 people like this
3 responses
@scheng1 (24948)
• Singapore
6 Feb 16
They are trying to take credits for something you have done. You have to hand over to the company but not necessary to those who want to get credits from your work.
1 person likes this
@Shavkat (46777)
• Philippines
6 Feb 16
@scheng1 Exactly my dear friend. That's so frustrating for those people whom I considered nibblers.
@JudyEv (100687)
• Bunbury, Australia
5 Feb 16
It is a shame if your hard work is not going to be recognised or is lost to you but I guess Owlwings is right, your employer owns your work.
1 person likes this
@Shavkat (46777)
• Philippines
5 Feb 16
@JudyEv Don't worry my friend. I had turned over the work done. It was recognized by the government agency and put my documentations in the archive library. I am the only one who had created such documentations. The sad thing, my co-workers in the field tried to control the situation.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (38162)
• Cambridge, England
5 Feb 16
It depends a great deal on your contract with your employer. It is very common, especially in government departments and agencies, for any work which you do in that employment to automatically become the property of the employer. In other words, you automatically agree to relinquish your rights to anything you develop in their employ and your colleagues (working for the same organisation) would have every right to access your databases and the data in them.
1 person likes this
@Shavkat (46777)
• Philippines
5 Feb 16
@owlwings I wasn't indicated in my MOA. Actually, it should be given to the main office. However, my team in the field is trying to retrieve from it. I had only received directives that I should surrender in the main office.
1 person likes this