Waiting for my DNA Test

United States
February 24, 2016 12:24pm CST
It's so hard to wait weeks and weeks for a test to come back! I received a DNA test from Ancestry as a Christmas gift and I didn't send it in right away. I was worried I might not do it right or something. I am really looking forward to it but will probably find out I'm 100% European or something equally boring after all the waiting. As in many families it was said by my grandmother that we had some Native American blood lines but in my research nothing has come up except that my grandmother and her ancestors lived pretty far west, out in Arkansas. Cherokee was the tribe mentioned and that is where they are from so who knows! I hope it arrives soon. I sent it in four weeks ago on Tuesday so I officially have two more weeks before it's late. They said about six weeks. I also think it might take longer due to all the ones sent in after Christmas. There is probably a backlog. How much do you know about your origins?
9 people like this
12 responses
@Juliaacv (30235)
• Canada
24 Feb 16
I have an older brother who asked my Dad who came before Grandma and Grandpa when he was about 6 years old. My Grandpa had the privilege of taking my brother out to the little country cemetery where our family plot is. He explained to him who the names belonged to. A few years later my Grandpa was given a box of papers from his brother's house that my Dad bought. It had deeds and letters from earlier generations. My Grandpa took those keepsakes and built a story, of how and when we immigrated to Canada around that. He accurately traced our roots back to 1835 when we came to Canada. I've been blessed to have a family that has done this work, because the stories of how this home came to be and when that farm was acquired and so on that I haven't had to go to anyone else for that information. I am always happy when I hear of others seeking their origins, and I look forward to hearing about yours once you hear them!
3 people like this
• United States
24 Feb 16
Bless them for taking care of that part of your education! What a treasure trove for you! I will certainly update when I hear anything! I do have an ancestor who lived in Canada around 1900 but on different census records it says born in Canada or Born in New York. What the hey? It happens all the time too!
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (30235)
• Canada
24 Feb 16
@Jeanniemaries He actually tracked back some of his ancestors who in the early 1900's moved to Montana and of course our cousins just over in Michigan. He made us all a copy of the history book, with the original being willed to my brother who started it all. It is amazing to see the penmanship that is displayed on envelopes and the 2 cent stamps used. And of course the property deeds and the old pictures and stories passed down. He even had the perfect "recipe" for his brother's cement, he has a thriving contractor business in Michigan.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Feb 16
@Juliaacv My mom is a saver like that and has so much stuff it will take us a lifetime to go through it! We are already sorting out some of it and distributing.
@irishidid (8563)
• United States
24 Feb 16
I did mine not too long ago. Hey, don't diss on us 100% Europeans! LOL One thing that surprised me was that I have zero Native American DNA. Everyone tells me I look Indian but not a drop. Still, I was pleased to have the Irish confirmed.
3 people like this
• United States
25 Feb 16
Ha! I'm really expecting it to come back that way, even so it will be nice to know! I'm open to anything, it matters not what it was but only what is is or will be!
@1wldngl (3991)
• United States
24 Feb 16
Oh, how interesting. What did the test require? I have a professor friend who did this and found out tons of info, unto and including what medical issues he might be prone to. My mother's people are from areas in Germany. Wendish is what my Grandmother called them, pronounced "vendish". My father's people are mostly Irish and supposedly some Cherokee and there might have been slave ancestry as well. I would LOVE to do the DNA thing. BE sure to update us please!
2 people like this
• United States
24 Feb 16
I will update for sure. I know I'm German, Irish and perhaps Scottish on my mom's side, but no clue on my dad side where the Cherokee is supposed to come from. The test required me to spit in a tube until the spit reached a certain level. It was not hard to do but hard to come up with so much spit! I could have if I did the test in my sleep....I'm always drooling!
2 people like this
@1wldngl (3991)
• United States
24 Feb 16
@Jeanniemaries HAahahahahaahahha, that's great! And gross. LOL I kind of figured it would be a swipe of your cheek lining like they do on TV.
1 person likes this
@irishidid (8563)
• United States
24 Feb 16
@Jeanniemaries I learned not to rely on Indian family stories. I'm supposed to have Indian too from claims of my bio family.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Feb 16
I know quite a lot my mother was very careful to fill my sister and I in on all of that.
2 people like this
• United States
24 Feb 16
Good for her!! I document everything on my Ancestry trees,
2 people like this
@Gillygirl (17282)
• Sutton, England
27 Feb 16
That sounds really interesting. I know I have Swedish, Scottish,m English and Irish blood.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Feb 16
Any Fitzgeralds in your Irish Family? Apparently all Fitzgeralds are cousins, descended from one person!
@JudyEv (123138)
• Bunbury, Australia
25 Feb 16
How exciting would this be? I'd be champing at the bit too.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Feb 16
I am! It can come any time I think, Some people get theirs back after a couple of weeks. It's all about how busy they are.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (105964)
• United States
24 Feb 16
I do know quite a bit through research. Both sides of my family originated in France, moved to England, and then settled in the USA in Virginia and North Carolina. It was interesting to note that my surname Corbin, started as Corbon in France, changed to Corbyn in England, and then to Corbin in the USA. On my grandmother's side, Haddock, we have a Knight who has his own Wiki page, but he is not a handsome knight at all! Perhaps it is the wig. We have a Corbin cemetery in VA and a Haddock Cemetery in NC. We have Corbin Hall in England and a monument to Sir Richard Haddock, Kt in England too. Haven't done my mother's side of the family, but that is a lot of work, so I am good for now. I have not done the DNA test, but it does sound exciting. Hope your results come very soon!
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Feb 16
You really have an interesting history! I have not seen any changes in the spelling of our name yet. But so far almost everything is from the U.S.
@just4him (116780)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
24 Feb 16
Not a whole lot, though I have a cousin by marriage who is into all the history of the family, and then I have another second cousin who showed me his wall in the basement that has a very in depth ancestry record and pictures on the wall to corroborate it. It's quite fascinating. There are three different ways to spell my last name and there's a city in Belgium called by my last name. Pretty impressive. At least I thought so when I saw the city marker with one of the ways to spell my last name. I hope it comes back soon for you.
• United States
25 Feb 16
That is great, there is usually one genealogist in the family!
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (25677)
• United States
22 Mar 16
I think that I know a good bit. I would like to do a test to confirm it.
@BelleStarr (38216)
• United States
26 Feb 16
Have you checked on ancestry's website to see the status? It depends how soon they started to work on it.
@trivia79 (7914)
• El Segundo, California
25 Feb 16
is it that important to know your origin?
@cacay1 (32861)
• Cagayan De Oro, Philippines
25 Feb 16
You have made very wise idea to trace your blood lines. I know about my origins through my parents, some older relatives , neighbors and elder brother and sister.