My mother's boab is doing well.

Boab tree, Western Australia
@JudyEv (126340)
Bunbury, Australia
May 16, 2016 8:11am CST
While we were in our home town recently we visited my brother who still lives in the house where my parents lived when they left the farm some decades ago. Mum had a boab tree on the farm of which she was very proud. She also had one in Narrogin and it is now starting to look like a true boab. Boabs are rarely seen in the south of Western Australia but are found in the Kimberleys and Northern Territory. The base of the boab swells to the point where one was once used as a temporary jail. Mum would have been thrilled to see her little boab growing so well although it has a long way to go yet before the base swells properly. The botanical name is Adansonia gregorii. It is the only boab or baobab to occur in Australia. There are six species in Madagascar and another two are found in mainland Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. They may reach 15 metres in height and trunks can have a diameter of over five metres. Not surprisingly it is sometimes called a bottle tree.
35 people like this
34 responses
@Marcyaz (35650)
• United States
16 May 16
When I first saw the picture I thought it sure has a big base to it and now I see why since the base swells to a size that can be used as a temporary jail, very interesting tree.
5 people like this
@vandana7 (66161)
• India
20 May 16
@JudyEv .. I am scared of sharks so I am never coming to Australia..but how long does it take for a tree to grow that big...I am 56...wish I had read something like this before..lol.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
23 May 16
@vandana7 I can't find anything that tells me how old the tree is. Sharks would only be a problem if you went swimming in the wrong areas so it's not really a good excuse not to come for a visit.
@JohnRoberts (60355)
• Los Angeles, California
16 May 16
I have never heard of this variety of tree. As they grow so large, sort of an answer to our Redwoods.
5 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
They wouldn't be anywhere near as tall as your redwoods but they would be much bigger round.
2 people like this
@just4him (120582)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
17 May 16
That's a beautiful tree. I had thought they were mostly African trees. It's nice you could get one to grow in Australia.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
Africa has more species than we do and some are a bit different.
3 people like this
@just4him (120582)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
18 May 16
@JudyEv Interesting. I thought they all looked the same.
3 people like this
@just4him (120582)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
19 May 16
@JudyEv I never paid attention to them. I will now with the information you've provided.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (53682)
• United States
16 May 16
That is one cool tree! And my first to see.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
Glad I've drawn it to your attention.
@rebelann (42015)
• El Paso, Texas
16 May 16
What a kool tree, now I'll have to research it to see if it would grow here in this arid hot climate of ours.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
I should think it would as it is hot and arid where it goes naturally in Australia.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (42015)
• El Paso, Texas
19 May 16
I only have a half acre @JudyEv I get the feeling it take more than that if I want to grow one.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 May 16
@rebelann I think half an acre would be enough, depending what else you had growing there.
2 people like this
@toniganzon (51780)
• Philippines
16 May 16
That's an interesting looking tree. I'm not really familiar with trees, plants, and flowers especially those that can't be seen in our own country.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
Sometimes we just don't notice how different various items are unless we are interested in them.
@toniganzon (51780)
• Philippines
18 May 16
@JudyEv Yeah right. The only tree i am familiar with is a coconut tree.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 May 16
@toniganzon I haven't seen too many real coconut trees! :)
1 person likes this
@Jessicalynnt (47895)
• Centralia, Missouri
16 May 16
I wonder why the Boabs do that
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
They store water for 'bad times'. Their native environment is hot and arid so they store water in the tissues in the trunk.
• Philippines
18 May 16
@JudyEv like camels?
4 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 May 16
@hereandthere Camels actually store fat in their humps, not water. :) Were you party to the discussion I had about that with, I think, @Lucky15?
3 people like this
@miniam (9236)
• Bern, Switzerland
16 May 16
This looks set to be a mighty tree, as you say,your mum could have been really proud.Im sure is is looking at it and smiling.Glad your brother did not cut it down. Does your brother have enough space/plot for when the tree gets really big?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
There is plenty of room for the tree but I don't know how long he will stay in the house. Hopefully the next owners will realise how unique the tree is in this area.
2 people like this
@miniam (9236)
• Bern, Switzerland
18 May 16
@JudyEv That`s another thing, you might find the tree hs so much meaning to you then the next person comes along and decided they dont want it and cuts it off.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 May 16
@miniam That is very true and quite likely to happen really. But nothing lasts forever.
1 person likes this
@Lucky15 (33750)
• Philippines
16 May 16
First time.to see.a.tree like this in photo. They grow up high...wow
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
I will do a post and a photo of the 'old' boab that my Mum planted on the farm.
1 person likes this
@Lucky15 (33750)
• Philippines
18 May 16
@JudyEv looking forward ma'am ;)
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16681)
• South Africa
16 May 16
Is this perhaps a family of the boabab tree like we have in Africa ?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
Australia only has the one species but Africa has several which accounts for the slightly different shapes of some of the African ones.
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (16681)
• South Africa
18 May 16
@JudyEv well thats nice to know anyway
1 person likes this
@Ronrybs (7392)
• London, England
16 May 16
I thought the lower trunk looked different. I guess it evolved for storing water.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
Yes, the aboriginal would get water from it if they needed to.
1 person likes this
@Ronrybs (7392)
• London, England
18 May 16
@JudyEv I was wondering about that
1 person likes this
@DianneN (80019)
• United States
16 May 16
I noticed the base of the trunk immediately. So unusual!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
I might do a post on the first boab Mum planted so that people can see the bigger one.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (80019)
• United States
18 May 16
@JudyEv I would love to see a larger one!
2 people like this
@topffer (34727)
• France
16 May 16
He looks very nice. In Western Africa they are used as "palaver trees" : it is the place in a village where people meet to talk and gossip. Quite all "palaver trees" are baobabs. Yours is still a bit young but in a few years it will do a good "palaver tree".
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
I know the word 'palaver'. It's a great word. If you look at the photo on Jerry Lai's comment you'll see Mum's first boab would now make a lovely palaver tree!
1 person likes this
@topffer (34727)
• France
18 May 16
@JudyEv Oh, it is impressive, and it would make a perfect palaver tree.
1 person likes this
@PainsOnSlate (20341)
• Canada
18 May 16
What fun to learn something new. The tree is so interesting. You might want to write about how they used it for a temporary jail. I can't figure out how....
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 May 16
If I can find a photo of it that I can use I will. Glad you enjoyed learning about it.
1 person likes this
@hereandthere (31994)
• Philippines
18 May 16
i think the same plant grows, bears fruits and flowers differently depending on the soil and climate. baobab trees remind me of the story of the little prince.
2 people like this
@mom210 (6788)
• Atlanta, Georgia
17 May 16
It is beautiful, glad he has taken such good care of it. I have never heard of them before.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
There would be very few around in the area. They are nearly all much further north.
2 people like this
@Shiva49 (13419)
• Singapore
17 May 16
Quite interesting tree with a huge and well rounded trunk - siva
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
The trunk will become much larger yet if it continues to thrive.
1 person likes this
@sol_cee (15932)
• Saint Vincent And The Grenadines
17 May 16
Is there a false boab?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
I don't know. I've never heard of one.
1 person likes this
• United States
17 May 16
no doubt she's smilin' down from the heavens o'er its success :) most interestin' how massive they get!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
I certainly hope she is. She loved her garden so much.
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@AnneEJ (5006)
• Dollard-Des-Ormeaux, Quebec
16 May 16
Great picture and nice description of a unique tree.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 May 16
Thanks. Glad you like it.