They still sell cloth bags at the checkout counters a Fiesta Mart

Dallas, Texas
June 8, 2016 3:05pm CST
For one dollar you get a very nice looking cloth bag with a handle on it. You can tote your groceries home in this re-usable tote as many times as you want to. It's good for the environment. If enough of us continued to use the cloth bags at checkout maybe the people who make those crappy slappy dappy plastic bags would go out of business!
3 people like this
3 responses
@zarlamain (24866)
• United States
8 Jun 16
I like the cloth bags at the Swedish furniture store, IKEA, although they can be overpriced.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
8 Jun 16
Yes, the price of 5 dollars would be too much even if the bag was designed by Ralph Lauren and had double stitching I would not want to pay that kind of price.
1 person likes this
@zarlamain (24866)
• United States
8 Jun 16
@lookatdesktop So funny! Same here. I wouldn't either. I'll stick to the one dollar generic ones I find at the dollar store.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
8 Jun 16
@zarlamain The cashier at the Fiesta Mart said "Even those larger bags, that hold twice as many groceries were made of plastic of a thicker material but were still not good for the environment." I told her I perfectly agreed. Cloth like canvas and cotton are best suited for reuse and can be washed and reused over and over again whereas the plastic bags tend to deteriorate and stretch and tear.
1 person likes this
@MGjhaud (20861)
• Philippines
9 Jun 16
we have those here for .21 cents each in different colors. i prefer using them than plastics.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
9 Jun 16
That is a good price.
1 person likes this
@irishidid (8732)
• United States
8 Jun 16
I do use mine but there are things I don't put in them, mainly bread items that tend to get squished by other items. This is usually when we're walking.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
9 Jun 16
I think most places that sell loaves of bread fail to understand this fact and do not provide a bag that is long enough to properly containerise the loaves. If they had enough imagination and ingenuity, they should be able to manufacture a cloth type bag that is both elongated and have enough framework around it's perimeters to keep a loaf of bread or two from becoming flat bread, so to speak and be long enough so as to make it possible to carry them and place them upright in a trunk.