A Child needs independence ... starting with a room of their own.

Dallas, Texas
June 10, 2016 1:50pm CST
If you grew up in a large family, chances are you had to share a bedroom with another sibling at one time or another. I first realized my sense of personal space and independence when I was able to get a room to call my own. But not just any room, actually the entire garage became my club house. My boy cave. If children grow up with no privacy they will have a hard time learning to live independently. Some people feel better in a single house, while others live as adults in cramped condos and apartments and have to deal with noisy people in adjoining rooms. If a child can start off early with a room to call their own, then their emotional and intellectual growth will also grow more. Mostly with a room of one's own, a child can learn some level of responsibility to keep and maintain their room by keeping their clothes put away and floors clean and tidy. If a child does not or is not willing or able to take care of their own room then they are not mature enough to handle it and should be made to share a room with a second sibling unless this produces more chaos. If a parent wants their child to eventually move out and be on their own, having a place they can call their own is the best way to insure their future as an independent adult.
3 people like this
3 responses
• India
10 Jun 16
Sir what you are saying is true but I feel there is another angle to this.By sharing a room children learn to share early in life.They also learn to care and adjust according to their siblings.If later on for higher studies or something else they have to live with room partners it would not be a big issue for them as they have whole life shared room.I think living in your own room alone and living with siblings in a room both have their pros and cons.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
10 Jun 16
So I think you are right. At early age, they need to learn to share a single space but as they grow older at some point they need some sense of independence. So I would have to say you're correct in your analysis. I both shared limited space with my younger brother and had two older sisters and lived in a 2 bedroom house but when I was about 12 or 13 my parents let me use the garage for my own club house which I used to play the piano and draw and have friends over to party. I always liked to socialize so in my case sharing as well as having my own space was the best of both worlds. So we are both in the same ball park.
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• India
10 Jun 16
@lookatdesktop Yes I agree with you on this.
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@miniam (9244)
• Bern, Switzerland
10 Jun 16
This can be looked both ways.I shared with my siblings till l left home and it did not bother me a single day, thinking back, l even loved it.Our room was(next to the roof sorry l don't know the right word) this made it cold at night,the best memories is the 3 of us squeezing in 1 bed for warmth,nothing beats this. I first had my own space when l left home, it felt empty and alone.I love the quiet now and cant imagine living with someone,l need my privacy but whenever im back home,i still remember our old room,since we`ve all moved out there is enough space, l still share with who ever might be there because l want to. So to end it,growing up, l did not need my space,l didn't know anything else apart from sharing but having said that,this was a very large room sub-divided by wardrobes so there was some kind of privacy. As a grown up, l need my privacy more.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
10 Jun 16
I appreciate you sharing this with everyone, and thus adding more light to this discussion.
@carebear29 (28175)
• Wausau, Wisconsin
10 Jun 16
That is very true
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• Dallas, Texas
10 Jun 16
I imagine single children grow up feeling alone and tend to get deep into their own little worlds. That might prove difficult when growing up and learning to related more with others. And on the flip side of the coin, a child who is often the youngest, feeling out of the loop with his or her older siblings might become socially and emotionally withdrawn if ignored by the older ones thus leading to a lifetime of social isolation and antisocial behavior, only in some cases, not always of course.
1 person likes this