Emergency Alerts in Senior's Residence

@patgalca (14664)
Orangeville, Ontario
June 16, 2016 8:25pm CST
I suggested hubby and I go for a walk over to the other side of town for an ice cream cone. Last year a new ice cream stand was opened with a new brand made locally that can be bought in stores, and with original flavours. Though the building hadn't been finished renovation, they continued throughout the winter. Anyway, on our way back we passed by a seniors' residence/retirement home. We looked up the long driveway and saw a person lying on the ground next to a wheel chair. He hadn't been there when we passed earlier but with the length of the walk it was probably half an hour previous. We went up the driveway to find an elderly man with a big gash on his head, blood dripping down the side of his head. We looked to the residence. Wasn't there anyone working there? I dialed 911 on my cell phone and soon a police car and then ambulance arrived. We learned from other residents that this man wanders off by himself often. The driveway is not very well paved and is sloped so it would be easy for someone to take a fall. The ambulance attendant said to the old man that they had picked him up there before. Between my husband and me and another lady who pulled her car into the driveway when she saw the man (the same time we did), we decided that this would not be a residence where we want to go or put a family member. An employee did come out, ran in to get a pillow, ran in again to get a wet cloth for his head, ran in again but never came out again. Was there only one person working there? (It was around supper time - yeah, that's right. We had an ice cream cone for dinner). I asked the police officer (as I looked around at the other residents) shouldn't they have emergency alarms on them. Who knows how long that guy was lying there? Other residents only came out when they saw these young strangers gathered in the driveway. The police officer said not all retirement homes have them, that they are expensive. I said, "What's more important?" My mother wears one and has done so for years. My husband said they have them at the gym where he works out. How expensive can they be? The ambulance attendants moved swiftly getting Arnold onto a board, a brace around his neck and into the ambulance. We asked the officer if we could leave and we did. I am still surprised that none of the residents have emergency alarms on them. I would think it would be mandatory at a seniors residence. By the way, when my husband first spoke to the elderly man the guy told him he was looking for his dog, a black poodle. My naive husband said he would go look and started asking if anyone had seen a dog. There's no dog, I told him. He's an old man and surely they don't allow pets in the residence. He's not in his right mind. My husband doesn't understand dementia in the elderly even with my mother having it. So that was the highlight of my day... week... month.
6 people like this
6 responses
@Susan2015 (22193)
• United States
17 Jun 16
That doesn't seem like a very safe place for any of the residents.
1 person likes this
@sharon6345 (147503)
• United States
17 Jun 16
I sure would think the kids of those parents would be more concerned with those alarms as well.
1 person likes this
@marlina (80591)
• Canada
17 Jun 16
I too, think that the elderly should have an emergency alarm on them. Can't be that expensive.
@shivamani10 (11170)
• Hyderabad, India
17 Jun 16
Really a great for you.
@MGjhaud (20861)
• Philippines
17 Jun 16
i would probably go ask around about a dog too. these elders with health issues shouldnt be left wandering on their own.
@josie_ (8012)
• Philippines
17 Jun 16
Not that there aren't such facilities available, but retirement homes don't fit with our Asian culture. I live in the Philippines and traditionally we take care of our elders at home. I suppose with the changing economical lifestyle of first world countries it has become acceptable to sent parents to senior's residence. Being a senior myself, I can't help but empathize with the plight of the elderly man in this story.