Pub Sign Study The Jack And Jill Brinnington Stockport Cheshire

Photo taken by me - Pub Sign - The Jack And Jill Brinnington Stockport Cheshire
Preston, England
July 3, 2016 2:48pm CST
Stockport has several pubs with fairy tale and nursery rhyme related names, including Little Jack Horner, Puss In Boots and this one, The Jack And Jill. Brinnington is a purpose built council housing estate area to the North of Stockport and an area regarded as quite rough to live in, though close to the gorgeous Reddish Vale Country Park. The Jack And Jill was the estate’s last pub, closing only this year after opening in 1954, leaving the estate with no local pub at all despite much protest in the community. The sign is very faithful to the rhyme, depicting the moment the children fall down the hill, with Jack’s crown breaking head injury caused by the heavy pale landing on and right over his head. Water flows down, so putting the well on top of a very steep hill is pretty stupid and impractical anyway. The names Jack and Jill are common euphemisms for boy and girl, and there have been various attempts to squeeze non-literal meanings out of the rhyme, which dates to at least the early 18th century in written form. One interpretation ties the story to the pre-Civil war troubles of King Charles 1st. He tried to raise money for his struggles against Scotland through various unpopular forms of taxation. One involved altering beer and spirit duties. One involved reducing the official volume required in Weights and Measures laws unadjusted. A gill (Jill) is equal to a quarter of a pint. TA Jack is half a pint. The end outcome of Charles’s reign was the fall of the monarchy and his execution by decapitation with a very literal dual-meaning for a broken crown, headlessness and republicanism. The rhyme probably really is just a literal play on the folly of the children struggling with heavy water carrying from an awkwardly located source though. It was a fun image to have on display, a rare breath of fresh air in a bleak low-prospects housing area that has now been deprived of its last evening social hub at least for the time being. Arthur Chappell
10 people like this
9 responses
@acelawrites (10401)
• Philippines
3 Jul 16
So famous nursery rhyme! Just wonder, like you said it, why they built a well on top of a hill? Or was it a symbolism only?
2 people like this
@GardenGerty (88870)
• Marion, Kansas
3 Jul 16
The artwork on this sign is worthy of a book. In many stories and rhymes there is often a second or even third meaning.
2 people like this
@JohnRoberts (36127)
• Los Angeles, California
3 Jul 16
That's a good one. Has that old time illustration feel.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (17276)
• South Africa
6 Jul 16
the thing I remember most about that rhyme is 'vinegar and brown paper' because when my sister broke her arm, my mom wrapped her arm in vinegar and brown paper and the Doctor shouted so at my mom as apparently it is very bad to do just that.
1 person likes this
• Preston, England
6 Jul 16
@Inlemay I would imagine the vinegar stinging quite a lot
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (17276)
• South Africa
6 Jul 16
@arthurchappell apparently it weakens the bones even more
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (91967)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Jul 16
It is a beautifully painted sign. In Australia apprentice stockmen and women are known as jackaroos and jillaroos - but you probably knew that! :)
1 person likes this
• Preston, England
4 Jul 16
@JudyEv actually no, that is new to me thanks
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (49067)
• United Kingdom
4 Jul 16
That looks like a great sign, it's a pity that the pub has closed.
1 person likes this
@Jessicalynnt (48191)
• Centralia, Missouri
4 Jul 16
I lean towards the rhymes once having an actual point, rather like Ring around the rosies.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (113039)
• Boise, Idaho
3 Jul 16
Interesting name for a bar and history behind it.
1 person likes this
@LoriAMoore (8792)
• United States
3 Jul 16
Loving these pub sign stories.
1 person likes this