Trying to save my aloe

United States
July 5, 2016 7:59am CST
Yeah, I know, every time I mention about how I kill aloe vera plants, many people wonder how I can do that since they are a hardy plant. Well, according to @DaddyEvil this last episode was because I took my plants outside in direct sun too quickly. I lost all but what you see in this picture (sorry it is not a good picture, my camera is not working well and my phone never did take decent pictures). Yesterday, I noticed this was laying down more than usual, so I tried to straightened it and the whole thing came out. DaddyEvil said to check if it was dry and smooth. I brushed off what I could, it didn't feel smooth, but felt like dried dirt and I saw what I hope was a tiny root. So I did what he said, I replanted it without watering it and I guess within a few days (or weeks?) I will know if I completely killed 3 pots of aloe vera plants. *Oh, maybe I should ask. Sun, indirect sun, shade? What would be best setting for this plant to make it?
9 people like this
11 responses
• United States
5 Jul 16
I have no tips to offer you with your Aloe plants. They are not a plant that I can grow. They never last long in my house.
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jul 16
Yes! Another aloe killer! I can't count how many people ask me how I can kill aloe because it is a hardy plant. I know it isn't from overwatering, because my friend who gave me my first one said they don't need a lot of water, so I would check the soil once in a while and if it was dry an inch from the surface, I would give it a little water. Now I find out I can't take a plant from inside and put it in direct sun too quick, or it will die, like I did this time. If this plant makes it, I think @DaddyEvil is going to get sick of me, because before I do anything, I am going to contact him first.
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jul 16
@Carmelanirel2 I have had several aloe plants over the years. People insist on giving them to me. I smile and accept the gracious gift. Then the countdown begins to where I find the dang plant on its last limb.
2 people like this
• United States
6 Jul 16
@Carmelanirel2 I just buy the aloe gel. Can't kill that stuff!
2 people like this
• China
6 Jul 16
Oh ,it is a pity! I haven't grow aloe vera,so don't know what has happened to your aloe vera.Hope they will come to life again!
2 people like this
• United States
6 Jul 16
I guess I will find out. It's funny though, a friend on Facebook posted a picture of her healthy plant with babies and she was asking if anyone wants some aloe. Too bad she doesn't live closer..
2 people like this
• China
7 Jul 16
@Carmelanirel2 Don't worry about your aloe vera,Maybe this friend can show you the ropes.
2 people like this
• United States
7 Jul 16
@changjiangzhibin89 True, I could bug her instead of @DaddyEvil, but I don't know if she really knows, or just so happens to have the touch to keep hers alive.
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jul 16
i used to keep mine'n the back porch, comin' into the house. but, one needs to acclimate 'em, jest's other plants moved in/out durin' the winter months. i still aint certain what occurred with my aloe, outside i didn't give't that quarter turn i'd been doin'. i've great hopes that new roots form 'long'ts stem, though i doubt it'll e'er stand upright'n its own.
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jul 16
I don't care if it stands on it's own, as long as it doesn't die and reproduces so I can have my twp potfuls like I had at the beginning of spring.
2 people like this
@sofssu (14742)
5 Jul 16
Over watering could kill aloes.. They are sun loving plants but keep them indirect sun light for a few days before you put any plant in direct sun. This one looks like root rot to me.
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jul 16
I never over-watered, that was the first thing I learned. I think putting it in direct sun too soon is what caused this problem.
2 people like this
@Marcyaz (36125)
• United States
5 Jul 16
In Arizona my aloe vera was in sunshine and I never had a problem with it, if I needed some I would just go out my door and cut a piece off of the plant.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jul 16
Yes, in hotter climates that is possible, but aloe would die here over the winter, so I had to bring them inside and then when I took them outside, I didn't consider it needed to be done slowly, so the plant could get use to the outdoors.
@Marcyaz (36125)
• United States
6 Jul 16
@Carmelanirel2 Oh I see you are in cold weather town yes then it is different.
1 person likes this
@koopharper (6216)
• Canada
5 Jul 16
My dad used to keep them in sunny windows and would get mad at us for over watering them.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jul 16
Yes, over watering will kill them. So he never put them outside in the summer? I wanted to do that because the bench my son made in school would make a great stand to put them on.
1 person likes this
• Canada
5 Jul 16
@Carmelanirel2 Almost never. We had a solarium though and they often spent the summer in there.
1 person likes this
@DaddyEvil (22002)
• United States
9 Jul 16
Indirect sun would be best for your damaged plant, Carmela! I also went looking for something that will help you with growing your aloe correctly. The Wiki how guide has almost everything correct, as far as I can see. The only things I see that they say to do that shouldn't actually be done is keeping it in full sun (unless it is talking about indoors in a window). When you move aloe outside in the late spring/early summer, you must acclimate your aloe by gradually moving it. Never place your aloe straight out into direct sunlight. This will cause your aloe to sunburn and begin dying. You can acclimate aloe vera to an outdoor environment by placing it in indirect sunlight for most of the day. Gradually (over about two weeks time) move your aloe vera into more direct sunlight for limited amounts of time each day. If you see your plant begin to have problems (lighter color or darker color on the exposed leaves) move it back into less sunlight. Like your aloe, I keep mine in full sun inside the house. As I told you before, if we were to look at the glass in our windows through a microscope, we would see many tiny bubbles of air and impurities in the glass. This keeps the plant from getting true direct sunlight. If a plant is moved from inside the house to the outside, it cannot be given direct sunlight outside at first, either. Keep it in indirect light for a few days, gradually giving it more direct sunlight. As long as you see nothing wrong, you are doing fine! An aloe should have five to seven hours of direct light a day, but I still don't allow mine to have noonday sun. Our plants were not born and raised in Africa, so cannot tolerate the bright, hot sunlight the original plants lived/thrived in. I have had mine for years and allow them direct sun early in the morning, and a little direct sun late in the day. The rest of the time, my aloe lives in indirect sunlight.
Aloe plants are native to tropical regions, but even if you live in a place with cold winters you can have a beautiful, healthy aloe plant that you keep indoors. Aloe plants should be potted in a soil mix made for succulents. They like to...
1 person likes this
@OreoBrownie (3358)
• Winder, Georgia
6 Jul 16
I couldn't get the like to work. Oh the poor aloe plant. My mom used to grow hers inside. I didn't know about sunlight killing them if exposed too much. That's good for future knowledge.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jul 16
Well, it wasn't the exposure to sunlight, but how I didn't let the plant used to the outside before placing them in direct light. Like when I have tomato starter plants inside, I can't just suddenly take them outside and transplant them in the sun, I have to take them outside in indirect sun for the plant to become stronger before I plant it in the ground. I have had friends who place their aloe outside in the summer, but I think that is one thing I won't do since I seem to do the wrong thing with this plant.
@OreoBrownie (3358)
• Winder, Georgia
6 Jul 16
I couldn't get the like to work. Oh the poor aloe plant. My mom used to grow hers inside. I didn't know about sunlight killing them if exposed too much. That's good for future knowledge.
1 person likes this
• United States
20 Jul 16
I must have been really busy to have missed you comment as well as DaddyEvil's. Yes, too much sun, especially if exposed to quickly, will kill aloe.
@Susan2015 (18312)
• United States
5 Jul 16
Can't help on this one. I have no green thumb at all.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jul 16
Same here, the plant has to be pretty hardy to survive with me.
@marguicha (80453)
• Chile
5 Jul 16
Someone told me they liked sun and loose soil.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jul 16
Yes, but if the plant was inside, not directly in the sun and then it is put into the sun right away, it is like transplanting tomato plants from inside to the ground, more than likely the plant will die. With my tomato plants, I out them outside in indirect sun until they get used to the outdoor climate.