Opening Lines.

BOOKS
By ARM
India
July 10, 2016 2:40am CST
Sunday morning. Got time to laze over my cup of tea and the morning paper. I checked out the comics section, I saw that the 'pretty young thing' had finally made up her mind that she liked 'him'. I left her sitting on her bed, wondering about the ideal approach and the opening line that would work best..... I started to wonder about 'opening lines' myself.. My apologies to the young people out there. Being the unabashed bookworm that I am , for me the term "opening lines' could only mean the opening sentences of a novel. Instantly I thought of ,"Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.” ....from Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. For me,these lines evoke my senses as poetry does. Suddenly, memories took over. Without any forewarning I could hear my father quoting these lines "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness......", as he would go on to discuss the novel and the French Revolution . These are opening sentences of Charles Dickens ,"Tale of Two Cities" And I have to put in my other favourite,..."What can you say about a twenty-five-year-old girl who died? That she was beautiful. And Brilliant. That she loved Mozart and Bach. And the Beatles. And me."...Love Story by Erich Segal. What about you? Do have any favourite opening lines of books that you read? Please do share. Photo---Free image from Pixabay
33 people like this
28 responses
@valmnz (12542)
• New Zealand
10 Jul 16
Thanks for the smile you've put on my face. I love this post. Now you have me thinking about what my favourite opening lines are.
10 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
Thank you for liking. Do share your 'opening lines' when you decide.
1 person likes this
@sueznewz2 (9705)
• Alicante, Spain
16 Jul 16
Yes...I have too....
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (147312)
• Switzerland
10 Jul 16
The same you mentioned, from the Novel Rebecca. I have watched the movie three days ago. I particularly love this novel, may be because I have lived in Monte-Carlo. It's the place where everything starts.
4 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
I too have watched the movie both the versions. Which one did you watch?The Laurence Olivier one? You have lived in interesting places.monte Carlo was also the setting for "To catch a thief", another movie that I like.
3 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
@LadyDuck I too likethe older version. Yes, Grace Kelly was an ethereal princess.
3 people like this
@puddleglum (1418)
• United States
10 Jul 16
Those are great opening lines! These are my favorite: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen “He was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad." Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini
3 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
Your first favourite is one I think is great too. Haven't read the second one, the opening lines are captivating though.
2 people like this
• United States
10 Jul 16
@responsiveme Opening lines are definitely crucial, since they must capture the reader's interest and convince them to keep reading. The Scaramouche opening lines pulled me in, when I first read the book. It's a historical adventure story. If you can access Project Gutenberg, it can be found there for free.
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
@puddleglum Thank you.I have accessed Project Gutenberg and read the stories there.I will go there and read this book too.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Jul 16
what beautiful memories such conjured fer ya :) i've been wrackin' my brain tryin' to recall my fav's...to no successful end. i can recall patches, then not the author'f such't seems? sometimes i truly despise these 'brain hiccups'. then 'gain perhaps i need to see if'n the eyes can hold'p to readin' novels 'n poetry yet 'gain, give this ol' brain a refresher course 'n the delights'f the written words 'f others. big hugs!
2 people like this
• India
11 Jul 16
Big hugs! I hate it when I am not in touch with you. I'll be off and on this month as its vacation time and I have lots of things to do and family visits.so when I am not here, you must know you are always on my mind. I am still searching for that postcard.I haven't forgotten. Take your time..... Even if you can recall patches, we can search together .Lets try. .
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Jul 16
@responsiveme aw, most kind 'f ya, my friend :D i'm so thrilled that'cha got that time off to spend with 'em, those precious (though sometimes chaotic) times 're where memories 're made'n our souls reconnected. leavin' 's somewhat exhausted 'n somehow renewed't the same time when life gets back to 'normal'. no worries'n that postcard, k? i aint frettin' o'er such, so don't let't burden ya. i'm'n the uphill battle (fingers crossed) 'n hopefully the memory'll return. if'n not, 'tis off to the library fer refresher courses. big hugs, 'n do've a great time!
1 person likes this
• India
12 Jul 16
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (36997)
• Portland, Connecticut
13 Jul 16
“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife”—from Pride and Prejudice
2 people like this
@BelleStarr (36997)
• Portland, Connecticut
13 Jul 16
@responsiveme No but I will look for it, I have read several other "continuation" novels.
2 people like this
• India
13 Jul 16
@BelleStarr this is not a continuation in the true sense because P D James is a very good mystery writer but she wanted to show her liking of Austen. Did you like the sequel to "gone with the wind? "
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (36997)
• Portland, Connecticut
13 Jul 16
@responsiveme I have to confess I never read it.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (53408)
• United Kingdom
10 Jul 16
I've always loved the opening lines of Edward Fitzgerald's 'The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam': 'Awake! for morning in the bowl of night Has flung the stone that puts the stars to flight'.
2 people like this
@jaboUK (53408)
• United Kingdom
10 Jul 16
@responsiveme I've corrected the typo, thanks. The whole poem is wonderful, but what about : The Moving Finger writes; and having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety and Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a line, Nor all your Tears wash out a word of it. (I've put the capitals in as Fitzgerald did, as you did the same.)
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
@jaboUK I never knew that was from the poem.Thank you. Yes, this is pretty well known too . Just a few days ago I was thinking of this quotation.What a coincidence.
1 person likes this
• India
11 Jul 16
@responsiveme I thought it was Shakespeare
1 person likes this
@topffer (33205)
• France
10 Jul 16
I have personally a penchant for forewords. I give you two opening foreword sentences of French books that you probably not know. Both have been translated in English, but the translations are not very good. "One of the greatest burlesques of the glorious epoch at which we have the good fortune to live, is unquestionably the rehabilitation of virtue undertaken by all the newspapers of every hue, red, green, or tri-colored." Théophile Gautier, Mademoiselle de Maupin, 1835. "In life, the most important is to have a priori opinions on everything." Boris Vian, L'écume des jours "Foam of the Days", 1947.
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
No, I don't know about the mentioned books. And the second opening foreword is exactly what I keep telling my younger son not to have.
1 person likes this
@topffer (33205)
• France
10 Jul 16
@responsiveme The opening of these books are sarcastic. For the second one, Vian continues with "It indeed seems that masses are always wrong, and individuals always right. We must avoid to deduce rules of conduct from this : they should not need to be formulated to be followed. There are only two things : it is love, in every way, with cute girls, and music from New-Orleans or Duke Ellington. The rest should better disappear, because the rest is ugly, and the few demonstration pages that are following are drawing all their strength from the fact that the story is completely true, because I imagined it from one side to the other. (...)" There are three movie adaptations of this book. Read it if you have an opportunity, you will not be deceived. It is a weird and wonderful love story. Since the 1980's this book is studied in high schools, and a lot of children in France have been called "Colin" and "Chloé" like the couple in this novel.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Froth on the Daydream First English-language edition cover Author Boris Vian Original title L'Écume des jours Translator Stanley Chapman Country France Language French Publisher Éditions Gal
1 person likes this
• India
10 Jul 16
@topffer I will keep the book on my to read list.Thank you.
1 person likes this
@silvermist (19802)
• India
10 Jul 16
That sentence from Rabecca has always been my favorite too.
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
Have you seen the movie?
1 person likes this
@silvermist (19802)
• India
18 Aug 16
@responsiveme Yes,I had seen the movie,but a very very long ago.
1 person likes this
@sofssu (14485)
10 Jul 16
I have no favorite opening lines but I love to quote Shakespeare, Keats, Shelly or Wordsworth. But I love all those ebooks you have mentioned.. I loved everyone of Eric Segal.. I also like to quote from the Bronte sisters too.
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
We did those poets at school. My mother keeps on quoting Shakespeare.She says there is a line for every situation in our lives.
1 person likes this
@sofssu (14485)
10 Jul 16
@responsiveme Yep, I know that your mom is right.
1 person likes this
@nomus24g (21459)
• India
10 Jul 16
Haha...for me, I am busy creating the closing lines of my own book, have been writing late nights to stick to Publisher's timeline..
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
Thats good.Please let us know when the book is completed
1 person likes this
@nomus24g (21459)
• India
10 Jul 16
@responsiveme Sure would need help from each one of you to spread the good word :)
1 person likes this
@aarifa (1212)
• India
10 Jul 16
I like to read good love stories..
2 people like this
• India
10 Jul 16
I like to read romantic books too.What is your favourite love story?
@SIMPLYD (78119)
• Philippines
13 Jul 16
How i wish i can still remember the nice opening lines of the books i have read . But when i was a child , my favorite opening line is " Once upon a time . . . . "
1 person likes this
• India
13 Jul 16
I think that was the favourite opening line of every child and still is....a time when we would be transported to the magical world of fairy tales.
1 person likes this
@SIMPLYD (78119)
• Philippines
13 Jul 16
@responsiveme Indeed . Our father bought us the two big books on Fairy Tales from Reader's Digest , i think . And that book was after a year , was already torn from our c0nstant flipping of the pages , and we are five girls.
1 person likes this
• India
13 Jul 16
@SIMPLYD Precious times and wonderful memories! don't you think so? BTW, nice to know you have 4 sisters.I missed out on having one.
1 person likes this
@sol_cee (14334)
• Saint Vincent And The Grenadines
11 Jul 16
Rebecca which never appeared in the book.
1 person likes this
• India
11 Jul 16
Yes! her shadowy presence dominated .By the way, you do travel a lot don't you?
@sol_cee (14334)
• Saint Vincent And The Grenadines
13 Jul 16
@responsiveme I do? lol
1 person likes this
• India
13 Jul 16
@sol_cee your location keeps changing
@Inlemay (16484)
• South Africa
11 Jul 16
I love the opening lines of A Tale of Two Cities - it describes so many days in my life as well.
1 person likes this
• India
11 Jul 16
Thats my father's favourite opening lines, we heard it again and again from him.....
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (16484)
• South Africa
11 Jul 16
@responsiveme brilliant lines - because with everything good there are always some worst of times too
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (16484)
• South Africa
15 Jul 16
@responsiveme when are you going to write a new piece, I look for something new to read almost daily - its time
1 person likes this
• Philippines
19 Jul 16
Well, I have one favorite but it's not from a novel or a book... It's from the movie "You've Got Mail" (1998). "What will NY152 say today, I wonder. I turn on my computer. I wait impatiently as it connects. I go online, and my breath catches in my chest until I hear three little words: You've got mail. I hear nothing. Not even a sound on the Streets of New York, just the beating of my own heart. I have mail. From you." - Kathleen Kelly, You've Got Mail.
1 person likes this
• India
20 Jul 16
I loved this film
1 person likes this
• Philippines
20 Jul 16
@responsiveme Me too. I have watched it for the nth times.
1 person likes this
@sueznewz2 (9705)
• Alicante, Spain
16 Jul 16
I'm afraid I do not read much..., and the few I do read do not open with classiclineslike the ones you've mentioned. ..which I enjoyed very much...and reading some of the other comment too...
1 person likes this
• India
16 Jul 16
Thats what a discussion is all about.Thanks for taking part.:)
1 person likes this
@sueznewz2 (9705)
• Alicante, Spain
16 Jul 16
@responsiveme that's right it is... thank you too....
1 person likes this
@salonga (27998)
• Philippines
14 Jul 16
I remembered the Old Man and the Sea of Ernest Hemingway. I was in college when we took up this novel. "He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish."
1 person likes this
• India
14 Jul 16
Yes, Hemingway is a person I have read a lot of. also books that you read in college leave an impact.
1 person likes this
@salonga (27998)
• Philippines
14 Jul 16
@responsiveme Big impact yes! especially that we even dramatize the story and all of us really prepared for it.
1 person likes this
@just4him (110011)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
12 Jul 16
I should pay more attention to opening lines, but I find that if the story grabs me with the first line I'm soon engrossed in the story that I forget what the first line was. I do know those mentioned from Charles Dickens and Erich Segal. I've read Love Story and seen the movie. I haven't read Tale of Two Cities, but I am familiar with the opening lines.
1 person likes this
• India
12 Jul 16
The first sentence does grab our attention.
1 person likes this
@just4him (110011)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
13 Jul 16
@responsiveme Yes it does and that is what I work at with my own work.
1 person likes this
@Lucky15 (33429)
• Philippines
10 Jul 16
I have one. "Will you do my euology?" From have a littlr faith by mitch albom. I was thinking of making a discussion about it ir something related to it. Lol
1 person likes this
• India
11 Jul 16
Thats an interesting one.
1 person likes this
@Lucky15 (33429)
• Philippines
11 Jul 16
@responsiveme the story too :)
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (99935)
• United States
10 Jul 16
I love the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Mr. Poe had the ability to hook a reader with those first lines. "The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could; but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge. You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that I gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitively settled -- but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk. I must not only punish, but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong." (The Cask Of Amontillado)
1 person likes this
• India
10 Jul 16
Those lines certainly will hook the reader. I will put it on my 'to read' list. The list is growing with so many suggestions by book lovers...and I am loving it.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (99935)
• United States
11 Jul 16
@responsiveme Me too!! Books make for such a delightful life!